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J. Baird Callicott (1980). Animal Liberation: A Triangular Affair.

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  1.  22
    Can a Corporation Be Worthy of Moral Consideration?Kenneth Silver - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    Much has been written about what corporations owe society and whether it is appropriate to hold them responsible. In contrast, little has been written about whether anything is owed to corporations apart from what is owed to their members. And when this question has been addressed, the answer has always been that corporations are not worthy of any distinct moral consideration. This is even claimed by proponents of corporate agency. In this paper, I argue that proponents of corporate agency should (...)
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  2.  5
    Environmental Ethics and Science: Resilience as a Moral Boundary.Osorio Felipe Bravo - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):121-134.
    Science has always been tightly associated with environmental ethics in a way traditional ethics has not. However, despite this proximity, science has had a merely informational role, where it must inform ethics but not intervene in ethical judgment. Science is seen as an amoral enterprise, requiring an ethics rather than recommending one. In this paper I try to go against this common view. First, I give a critique of the naturalistic fallacy following the lines of Frankena. Then I go on (...)
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  3.  38
    Captivity for Conservation? Zoos at a Crossroads.Jozef Keulartz - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):335-351.
    This paper illuminates a variety of issues that speak to the question of whether ‘captivity for conservation’ can be an ethically acceptable goal of the modern zoo. Reflecting on both theoretical disagreements and practical challenges , the paper explains why the ‘Noah’s Ark’ paradigm is being replaced by an alternative ‘integrated approach.’ It explores the changes in the zoo’s core tasks that the new paradigm implies. And it pays special attention to the changes that would have to be made in (...)
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  4.  14
    Against Kangaroo Harvesting.Freya Mathews - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):263-265.
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  5.  29
    Multiple Criteria and Trade-Offs in Environmental Ethics.Sahotra Sarkar - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):533-537.
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  6.  25
    An Ecological Concept of Wilderness. DeLancey - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):25-44.
  7.  20
    Hinduism and Environmental Ethics: An Analysis and Defense of a Basic Assumption.Christopher G. Framarin - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (1):75-91.
    The literature on Hinduism and the environment is vast, and growing quickly. It has benefitted greatly from the work of scholars in a wide range of disciplines, such as religious studies, Asian studies, history, anthropology, political science, and so on. At the same time, much of this work fails to define key terms and make fundamental assumptions explicit. Consequently, it is at least initially difficult to engage with it philosophically. In the first section of this paper, I clarify a central, (...)
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  8.  30
    Stakeholders and Sustainability: An Evolving Theory. [REVIEW]Kevin Gibson - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (1):15-25.
    This conceptual article has three parts: In the first, I discuss the shortcomings of treating the environment as a stakeholder and conclude that doing so is theoretically vague and lacks prescriptive force. In the second part, I recommend moving from broad notions of preserving nature and appeals to beauty to a more concrete analytic framework provided by the idea of human sustainability. Using sustainability as the focus of concern is significant as it provides us with a more tenable and quantifiable (...)
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  9. The Anthropocentric Advantage? Environmental Ethics and Climate Change Policy.Nicole Hassoun - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):235-257.
    Environmental ethicists often criticize liberalism. For many liberals embrace anthropocentric theories on which only humans have non?instrumental value. Environmental ethicists argue that such liberals fail to account for many things that matter or provide an ethic sufficient for addressing climate change. These critics suggest that many parts of nature ? e.g. non?human individuals, other species, ecosystems and the biosphere ? often these critics also hold that concern for some parts of nature does not always trump concern for others. This article (...)
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  10. Meat and Morality: Alternatives to Factory Farming. [REVIEW]Evelyn B. Pluhar - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):455-468.
    Scientists have shown that the practice of factory farming is an increasingly urgent danger to human health, the environment, and nonhuman animal welfare. For all these reasons, moral agents must consider alternatives. Vegetarian food production, humane food animal farming, and in-vitro meat production are all explored from a variety of ethical perspectives, especially utilitarian and rights-based viewpoints, all in the light of current U.S. and European initiatives in the public and private sectors. It is concluded that vegetarianism and potentially in-vitro (...)
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  11.  62
    Biomedical and Environmental Ethics Alliance: Common Causes and Grounds. [REVIEW]Lori Gruen & William Ruddick - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):457-466.
    In the late 1960s Van Rensselaer Potter, a biochemist and cancer researcher, thought that our survival was threatened by the domination of military policy makers and producers of material goods ignorant of biology. He called for a new field of Bioethics—“a science of survival.” Bioethics did develop, but with a narrower focus on medical ethics. Recently there have been attempts to broaden that focus to bring biomedical ethics together with environmental ethics. Though the two have many differences—in habits of thought, (...)
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  12. Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions.Ramona Cristina Ilea - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a flurry of other (...)
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  13. Environmental Ethics: An Overview.Katie McShane - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  14.  22
    Environmental Ethics and Size.Charles S. Cockell - 2008 - Ethics and the Environment 13 (1):pp. 23-39.
    Environmental policy has a size bias. Small organisms, such as microorganisms, command less attention from environmentalists than larger organisms, such as birds and large mammals. A simple thought experiment involving microscopic polar bears and giant microorganisms illustrates the importance of size in environmental ethics. Given the positive correlation between body size and brain size, there is probably a basis for a size bias in environmental ethics using ethical frameworks based on conations. This paper examines the relevance of the size of (...)
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  15. Seeing Animals, Speaking of Nature.Ito Mimei - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (4):119-137.
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  16.  70
    From Environmental to Ecological Ethics: Toward a Practical Ethics for Ecologists and Conservationists.Ben A. Minteer & James P. Collins - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):483-501.
    Ecological research and conservation practice frequently raise difficult and varied ethical questions for scientific investigators and managers, including duties to public welfare, nonhuman individuals (i.e., animals and plants), populations, and ecosystems. The field of environmental ethics has contributed much to the understanding of general duties and values to nature, but it has not developed the resources to address the diverse and often unique practical concerns of ecological researchers and managers in the field, lab, and conservation facility. The emerging field of (...)
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  17.  10
    Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand.Christopher J. Preston - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):23 - 39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection – descent through modification – leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  18.  2
    Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand.Christopher J. Preston - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):23-39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection - descent through modification - leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  19. Dimensions of Naturalness.Helena Siipi - 2008 - Ethics and the Environment 13 (1):pp. 71-103.
    This paper presents a way of classifying different forms of naturalness and unnaturalness. Three main forms of (un)naturalness are found as the following: history- based (un)naturalness, property-based (un)naturalness and relation-based (un)naturalness. Numerous subforms (and some subforms of the subforms) of each are presented. The subforms differ with respect to the entities that are found (un)natural, with respect to their all-inclusiveness, and whether (un)naturalness is seen as all-or-nothing affair, or a continuous gradient. This kind of conceptual analysis is needed, first, because (...)
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  20.  52
    The Care of Self and Environmental Politics: Towards a Foucaultian Account of Dietary Practice.Joseph J. Tanke - 2007 - Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):79-96.
    : This essay appropriates the understanding of ethics developed by Michel Foucault in his courses at the Collège de France from 1980 until his death in 1984, with the aim of formulating a progressive environmental politics. As such, it attempts to navigate some of the long–standing divides between the movement for animal rights and environmental ethics proper, finding in the practice of vegetarianism a form of self-relation that is conducive to critical forms of speech and politics. The final phase of (...)
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  21.  60
    The Moral Considerability of Invasive Transgenic Animals.Benjamin Hale - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (4):337-366.
    The term moral considerability refers to the question of whether a being or set of beings is worthy of moral consideration. Moral considerability is most readily afforded to those beings that demonstrate the clearest relationship to rational humans, though many have also argued for and against the moral considerability of species, ecosystems, and “lesser” animals. Among these arguments there are at least two positions: “environmentalist” positions that tend to emphasize the systemic relations between species, and “liberationist” positions that tend to (...)
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  22.  51
    Making and Finding Values in Nature: From a Humean Point of View.Y. S. Lo - 2006 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):123 – 147.
    The paper advances a Humean metaethical analysis of "intrinsic value" - a notion fundamental in moral philosophy in general and particularly so in environmental ethics. The analysis reduces an object's moral properties (e.g., its value) to the empirical relations between the object's natural properties and people's psychological dispositions to respond to them. Moral properties turn out to be both objective and subjective, but in ways compatible with, and complementary to, each other. Next, the paper investigates whether the Humean analysis can (...)
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  23. Animal Ethics and Interest Conflicts.Elisa Aaltola - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):19-48.
    : Animal ethics has presented convincing arguments for the individual value of animals. Animals are not only valuable instrumentally or indirectly, but in themselves. Less has been written about interest conflicts between humans and other animals, and the use of animals in practice. The motive of this paper is to analyze different approaches to interest conflicts. It concentrates on six models, which are the rights model, the interest model, the mental complexity model, the special relations model, the multi-criteria model, and (...)
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  24.  24
    Asian Traditions of Knowledge: The Disputed Questions of Science, Nature and Ecology.A. Brennan - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):567-581.
    The search for 'ecological insights' in venerable Asian traditions of thought prompts questions about how such traditions understood humans in relation to nature. Answers which focus on philosophical and religious ideas may overlook culturally important understandings of people and places articulated within scientific and medical thinking. The paper tentatively explores the prospects for gleaning a form of ethics of place from the study of traditional Hindu and Chinese medical sources. Although there are serious problems with the idea that any unadulterated (...)
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  25.  5
    Asian Traditions of Knowledge: The Disputed Questions of Science, Nature and Ecology.Andrew Brennan - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):567-581.
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  26.  24
    Katz's Problematic Dualism and its "Seismic" Effects on His Theory.Wayne Ouderkirk - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):124-137.
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  27.  4
    Katz's Problematic Dualism and Its?Seismic? Effects on His Theory.Wayne Ouderkirk - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):124-137.
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  28.  48
    Environmental Ethics and Trophy Hunting.Alastair S. Gunn - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):68-95.
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  29.  35
    Persons in Nature: Toward an Applicable and Unified Environmental Ethics.Frederick Ferré - 1996 - Ethics and the Environment 1 (1):15-25.
    There is a dilemma facing mainstream environmental ethicists. One of our leading spokesmen, Holmes Rolston, III, offers a rich ethical position, but one that lacks internal connections between principles relevant to the environment and principles relevant to human society. These principles are just different; thus no higher-order guidance is available to cope with cases of conflict between them. A second major spokesman, Baird Callicott, recommends a "land ethics" that is internally coherent but sadly inadequate for addressing many distinctly human ethical (...)
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  30.  41
    A Critical Overview of Environmental Ethics.Warwick Fox - 1996 - World Futures 46 (1):1-21.
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  31.  59
    Persons in Nature: Toward an Applicable and Unified Environmental Ethics.Frederick Ferre - 1993 - Zygon 28 (4):441-453.
    There is a dilemma facing mainstream environmental ethicists. One of our leading spokesmen, Holmes Rolston, III, offers a rich ethical position, but one that lacks internal connections between principles relevant to the environment and principles relevant to human society. These principles are just different; thus no higher-order guidance is available to cope with cases of conflict between them. A second major spokesman, Baird Callicott, recommends a "land ethics" that is internally coherent but sadly inadequate for addressing many distinctly human ethical (...)
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  32.  18
    Divine Agriculture.Charles Taliaferro - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (3):71-80.
    Theological literacy is an important asset in the development of a comprehensive agricultural ethic and philosophy. Four areas are delimited in which theological reflection is relevant for agricultural study.
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  33.  26
    We Should Not Manipulate the Genome of Domestic Hogs.Steve F. Sapontzis - 1991 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (2):177-185.
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  34.  31
    Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies?Robert Sessions - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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  35.  14
    Animal Liberationism, Ecocentrism, and the Morality of Sport Hunting.Maurice L. Wade - 1990 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 17 (1):15-27.
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  36.  14
    Ethical Dilemmas in Agriculture: The Need for Recognition and Resolution. [REVIEW]Paul B. Thompson - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):4-15.
    Agricultural research and education ended 100 years of funding under the Hatch Act with a decade of unprecedented criticism of goals and outcomes. This paper examines the way that planners can accommodate some of these criticisms within a framework for understanding the ethical and social goals of agriculture that is consistent with traditional practice. The paper goes on to state that some criticisms are so fundamental that they cannot be readily incorporated into this framework. They must be regarded as a (...)
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  37.  25
    The Role of Rules in Ethical Decision Making.Eugene C. Hargrove - 1985 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 28 (1-4):3 – 42.
    Using chess decision making as a model for ethical decision making, I show that ethical decisions rarely involve the conscious application of moral rules. I discuss the metaethical and normative implications of this aspect of ethical decision making in terms of the moral philosophies of Sartre, Hare, and Aristotle. I conclude with a discussion of the implications of the chess model in research and teaching in applied ethics.
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