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  1. Causation and Time Reversal.Matt Farr - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx025.
    What would it be for a process to happen backwards in time? Would such a process involve different causal relations? It is common to understand the time reversal invariance of a physical theory in causal terms, such that whatever can happen forwards in time (according to the theory) can also happen backwards in time. This has led many to hold that time reversal symmetry is incompatible with the asymmetry of cause and effect. This paper critiques the causal reading of time (...)
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  • An Empirical Approach to Symmetry and Probability.Jill North - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (1):27-40.
    We often use symmetries to infer outcomes’ probabilities, as when we infer that each side of a fair coin is equally likely to come up on a given toss. Why are these inferences successful? I argue against answering this with an a priori indifference principle. Reasons to reject that principle are familiar, yet instructive. They point to a new, empirical explanation for the success of our probabilistic predictions. This has implications for indifference reasoning in general. I argue that a priori (...)
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  • The Arrow of Time in Physics.David Wallace - unknown
    I provide a self-contained introduction to the problem of the arrow of time in physics, concentrating on the irreversibility of dynamical processes as described in statistical mechanics.
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  • Two Views on Time Reversal.Jill North - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (2):201-223.
    In a recent paper, Malament (2004) employs a time reversal transformation that differs from the standard one, without explicitly arguing for it. This is a new and important understanding of time reversal that deserves arguing for in its own right. I argue that it improves upon the standard one. Recent discussion has focused on whether velocities should undergo a time reversal operation. I address a prior question: What is the proper notion of time reversal? This is important, for it will (...)
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  • Does Quantum Time Have a Preferred Direction?Bryan W. Roberts - unknown
    This paper states and proves a precise sense in which, if all the measurable properties of an ordinary quantum mechanical system are ultimately derivable from position, then time in quantum mechanics can have no preferred direction. In particular, I show that when the position observable forms a complete set of commuting observables, Galilei invariant quantum mechanics is guaranteed to be time reversal invariant.
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  • Rovelli on Disharmony Between the Quantum Arrows of Time.Bryan W. Roberts - unknown
    Rovelli argues that the there is disharmony with respect to the arrow of time from the perspective of testable predictions, as compared to the perspective of Schroedinger evolution, and uses this claim as evidence against realist interpretations of the wave function. I argue on the contrary that this disharmony arises only out of a non-standard definition of time reversal that ignores the 'big-T', and that harmony is restored when the standard definition is adopted.
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  • Three Myths About Time Reversal in Quantum Theory.Bryan W. Roberts - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (2):315-334.
    Many have suggested that the transformation standardly referred to as `time reversal' in quantum theory is not deserving of the name. I argue on the contrary that the standard definition is perfectly appropriate, and is indeed forced by basic considerations about the nature of time in the quantum formalism.
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