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  1. Moral Distress in Health Care: When is It Fitting?Lisa Tessman - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):165-177.
    Nurses and other medical practitioners often experience moral distress: they feel an anguished sense of responsibility for what they take to be their own moral failures, even when those failures were unavoidable. However, in such cases other people do not tend to think it is right to hold them responsible. This is an interesting mismatch of reactions. It might seem that the mismatch should be remedied by assuring the practitioner that they are not responsible, but I argue that this denies (...)
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  • Rethinking Moral Distress: Conceptual Demands for a Troubling Phenomenon Affecting Health Care Professionals.Daniel W. Tigard - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):479-488.
    Recent medical and bioethics literature shows a growing concern for practitioners’ emotional experience and the ethical environment in the workplace. Moral distress, in particular, is often said to result from the difficult decisions made and the troubling situations regularly encountered in health care contexts. It has been identified as a leading cause of professional dissatisfaction and burnout, which, in turn, contribute to inadequate attention and increased pain for patients. Given the natural desire to avoid these negative effects, it seems to (...)
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  • The Standard Account of Moral Distress and Why We Should Keep It.Joan McCarthy & Settimio Monteverde - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (4):319-328.
    In the last three decades, considerable theoretical and empirical research has been undertaken on the topic of moral distress among health professionals. Understood as a psychological and emotional response to the experience of moral wrongdoing, there is evidence to suggest that—if unaddressed—it contributes to staff demoralization, desensitization and burnout and, ultimately, to lower standards of patient safety and quality of care. However, more recently, the concept of moral distress has been subjected to important criticisms. Specifically, some authors argue that the (...)
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  • Facilitating and Motivating Factors for Reporting Reprehensible Conduct in Care: A Study Among Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in the Netherlands.Luppo Kuilman, Gerard Jansen, Laetitia B. Mulder & Petrie Roodbol - 2021 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 27 (4):776-784.
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  • Christian Bioethics and the Partisan Commitments of Secular Bioethicists: Epistemic Injustice, Moral Distress, Civil Disobedience.Mark J. Cherry - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (2):123-139.
    Secular bioethicists do not speak from a place of distinction, but from within particular culturally, socially, and historically conditioned standpoints. As partisans of moral and ideological agendas, they bring their own biases, prejudices, and worldviews to their roles as ethical consultants, social advocates, and academics, attempting rhetorically to sway others and shift policy to a preferred point of view. Their pronouncements represent just one voice among others, even when delivered with strident rhetoric, in an educated and knowing tone, from within (...)
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  • Moral Distress as a Symptom of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):353-371.
    The experience of ‘moral distress’ is an increasing focal point of contemporary medical and bioethics literature, yet it has received little attention in discussions intersecting with ethical theory. This is unfortunate, as it seems that the peculiar phenomenon may well help us to better understand a number of issues bearing both practical and theoretical significance. In this article, I provide a robust psychological profile of moral distress in order to shed a newfound light upon the longstanding problem of ‘dirty hands’. (...)
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  • Care, Commitment and Moral Distress.Joseph P. Walsh - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (3):615-628.
    Moral distress has been the subject of extensive research and debate in the nursing ethics literature since the mid-1980s, but the concept has received comparatively little attention from those working outside of applied ethics. In this article, I defend a care ethical account of moral distress, according to which the phenomenon is the product of an agent’s inability to live up to one of her caring commitments. This account has a number of attractions. First, it places a greater emphasis on (...)
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  • Moral Luck in Team‐Based Health Care.Daniel Story & Catelynn Kenner - 2021 - Nursing Philosophy 22 (1).
    Clinicians regularly work as teams and perform joint actions that have a great deal of moral significance. As a result, clinicians regularly share moral responsibility for the actions of their teams and other clinicians. In this paper, we argue that clinicians are exceptionally susceptible to a special type of moral luck, called interpersonal moral luck, because their moral statuses are often affected by the actions of other clinicians in a way that is not fully within their control. We then argue (...)
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  • Researchers Experience Moral Distress Too!Cynthia M. A. Geppert & Toby Schonfeld - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):100-101.
    Traditional approaches to human subjects protections in the United States focus on the ethical principles from the Belmont Report: respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. Since research regu...
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  • Moral Injury in Healthcare Professionals: A Scoping Review and Discussion.Anto Čartolovni, Minna Stolt, P. Anne Scott & Riitta Suhonen - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302096677.
    Moral injury emerged in the healthcare discussion quite recently because of the difficulties and challenges healthcare workers and healthcare systems face in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moral injury involves a deep emotional wound and is unique to those who bear witness to intense human suffering and cruelty. This article aims to synthesise the very limited evidence from empirical studies on moral injury and to discuss a better understanding of the concept of moral injury, its importance in the healthcare (...)
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  • Morality, Normativity and Measuring Moral Distress.Roger Newham - 2021 - Nursing Philosophy 22 (1).
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  • Moral Distress and Conflict of Interest.Haavi Morreim - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):27-29.
  • Moral Distress in Scientific Research.David B. Resnik - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):13-15.
  • The Moral Distress of Patients and Families.Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):68-70.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 68-70.
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  • How to Support Patient and Family in Dealing with Ethical Issues? The Relevance of Moral Case Deliberation.Guy Widdershoven, Margreet Stolper, Bert Molewijk & Suzanne Metselaar - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):70-72.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 70-72.
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  • Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
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  • Re-Defining Moral Distress: A Systematic Review and Critical Re-Appraisal of the Argument-Based Bioethics Literature.Christine Sanderson, Linda Sheahan, Slavica Kochovska, Tim Luckett, Deborah Parker, Phyllis Butow & Meera Agar - 2019 - Clinical Ethics 14 (4):195-210.
    The concept of moral distress comes from nursing ethics, and was initially defined as ‘…when one knows the right thing to do, but institutional constraints make it nearly impossible to pursue the right course of action’. There is a large body of literature associated with moral distress, yet multiple definitions now exist, significantly limiting its usefulness. We undertook a systematic review of the argument-based bioethics literature on this topic as the basis for a critical appraisal, identifying 55 papers for analysis. (...)
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  • Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making Lead to Moral Distress?Trisha M. Prentice & Lynn Gillam - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):259-268.
    When healthcare professionals feel constrained from acting in a patient’s best interests, moral distress ensues. The resulting negative sequelae of burnout, poor retention rates, and ultimately poor patient care are well recognized across healthcare providers. Yet an appreciation of how particular disciplines, including physicians, come to be “constrained” in their actions is still lacking. This paper will examine how the application of shared decision-making may contribute to the experience of moral distress for physicians and why such distress may go under-recognized. (...)
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  • Caregiving and Moral Distress for Family Caregivers During Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease.Chris Weigel - 2019 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (2):74-91.
    That diseases such as Alzheimer’s present many kinds of vulnerabilities for the afflicted is perhaps too obvious to mention given that a person with Alzheimer’s disease eventually becomes dependent on others for most basic, everyday needs. The ensuing vulnerabilities have physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and legal aspects, as well as aspects concerning autonomy. Such diseases also present a wide range of vulnerabilities for caregivers across multiple domains. Caregivers are vulnerable, for example, to social isolation, physical exhaustion, stress, and loss of (...)
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  • What is ‘Moral Distress’? A Narrative Synthesis of the Literature.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Fiona Irvine - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301772435.
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  • What's Philosophical About Moral Distress?Nancy J. Matchett - 2018 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association 2 (13):2108-19.
    Moral distress is a well-documented phenomenon in the nursing profession, and increasingly thought to be implicated in a nation-wide nursing shortage in the US. First identified by the philosopher Andrew Jameton in 1984, moral distress has also proven resistant to various attempts to prevent its occurrence or at least mitigate its effects. While this would seem to be bad news for nurses and their patients, it is potentially good news for philosophical counselors, for whom there is both socially important and (...)
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  • Moral Distress and Cooperation With Wrongdoing.Stephen R. Latham - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):31-32.
  • A Misunderstanding of Moral Distress.Lucia D. Wocial - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):21-23.
  • Moral Sensitivity as a Precondition of Moral Distress.Markus Christen & Johannes Katsarov - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):19-21.
  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress”.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):1-3.
  • Moral Distress, Moral Injury, and Moral Luck.Andrew McAninch - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):29-31.
  • Understanding Moral Distress Through the Lens of Social Reflective Equilibrium.Carolyn W. April & Michael D. April - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):25-27.
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  • The Ethical Significance of Moral Distress: Inequality and Nurses’ Constraint-Distress.Carina Fourie - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):23-25.
  • The Normative and Evaluative Status of Moral Distress in Health Care Contexts.Sven Nyholm - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):17-19.
    Stephen Campbell, Connie Ulrich, and Christine Grady argue that we need to a broader understanding of moral distress – broader, that is, than the one commonly used within nursing-ethics and, more recently, healthcare ethics in general. On their proposed definition, moral distress is any self-directed negative attitude we might have in response to viewing ourselves as participating in a morally undesirable situation. While being in general agreement with much of what Campbell et al. say, I make two suggestions. First, in (...)
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  • Is Broader Better?Elizabeth G. Epstein, Ashley R. Hurst, Dea Mahanes, Mary Faith Marshall & Ann B. Hamric - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):15-17.
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  • Moral Distress: Professional Integrity as the Basis for Taxonomies.Tessy Ann Thomas & Courtenay Rose Bruce - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):11-13.
  • The Role of Responsibility in Moral Distress.Moti Gorin - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):10-11.
  • Moral Distress in Clinical Ethics: Expanding the Concept.Alyssa M. Burgart & Katherine E. Kruse - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):1-1.