Switch to: References

Citations of:

Symbol grounding and the symbolic theft hypothesis

In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer Verlag. pp. 191--210 (2002)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. An Embodied Model for Sensorimotor Grounding and Grounding Transfer: Experiments With Epigenetic Robots.Angelo Cangelosi & Thomas Riga - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):673-689.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Grounding Symbols in the Physics of Speech Communication.Simon F. Worgan & Robert I. Damper - 2007 - Interaction Studies 8 (1):7-30.
    The traditional view of symbol grounding seeks to connect an a priori internal representation or ‘form’ to its external referent. But such a ‘form’ is usually itself systematically composed out of more primitive parts, so this view ignores its grounding in the physics of the world. Some previous work simulating multiple talking/listening agents has effectively taken this stance, and shown how a shared discrete speech code can emerge. Taking the earlier work of Oudeyer, we have extended his model to include (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On Fodor on Darwin on Evolution.Stevan Harnad - manuscript
    Jerry Fodor argues that Darwin was wrong about "natural selection" because (1) it is only a tautology rather than a scientific law that can support counterfactuals ("If X had happened, Y would have happened") and because (2) only minds can select. Hence Darwin's analogy with "artificial selection" by animal breeders was misleading and evolutionary explanation is nothing but post-hoc historical narrative. I argue that Darwin was right on all counts. Until Darwin's "tautology," it had been believed that either (a) God (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Symbol Grounding Problem has Been Solved. So What's Next.Luc Steels - 2008 - In Manuel de Vega, Arthur Glenberg & Arthur Graesser (eds.), Symbols and Embodiment: Debates on Meaning and Cognition. Oxford University Press. pp. 223--244.
  • Cognitive Ecology.Edwin Hutchins - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):705-715.
    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson’s ecological psychology, Bateson’s ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • Distributed Processes, Distributed Cognizers and Collaborative Cognition.Stevan Harnad - 2005 - [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 13 (3):01-514.
    Cognition is thinking; it feels like something to think, and only those who can feel can think. There are also things that thinkers can do. We know neither how thinkers can think nor how they are able do what they can do. We are waiting for cognitive science to discover how. Cognitive science does this by testing hypotheses about what processes can generate what doing (“know-how”) This is called the Turing Test. It cannot test whether a process can generate feeling, (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Synthetic Semiotics: On Modelling and Simulating the Emergence of Sign Processes.Angelo Loula & Joao Queiroz - unknown
    Based on formal-theoretical principles about the sign processes involved, we have built synthetic experiments to investigate the emergence of communication based on symbols and indexes in a distributed system of sign users, following theoretical constraints from C.S.Peirce theory of signs, following a Synthetic Semiotics approach. In this paper, we summarize these computational experiments and results regarding associative learning processes of symbolic sign modality and cognitive conditions in an evolutionary process for the emergence of either symbol-based or index-based communication.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Evolution of Language: A Comparative Review. [REVIEW]W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):193-203.
    For many years the evolution of language has been seen as a disreputable topic, mired in fanciful “just so stories” about language origins. However, in the last decade a new synthesis of modern linguistics, cognitive neuroscience and neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory has begun to make important contributions to our understanding of the biology and evolution of language. I review some of this recent progress, focusing on the value of the comparative method, which uses data from animal species to draw inferences about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • How Language Programs the Mind.Gary Lupyan & Benjamin Bergen - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):408-424.
    Many animals can be trained to perform novel tasks. People, too, can be trained, but sometime in early childhood people transition from being trainable to something qualitatively more powerful—being programmable. We argue that such programmability constitutes a leap in the way that organisms learn, interact, and transmit knowledge, and that what facilitates or enables this programmability is the learning and use of language. We then examine how language programs the mind and argue that it does so through the manipulation of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • How Language Programs the Mind.Gary Lupyan & Benjamin Bergen - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):408-424.
    Many animals can be trained to perform novel tasks. People, too, can be trained, but sometime in early childhood people transition from being trainable to something qualitatively more powerful—being programmable. We argue that such programmability constitutes a leap in the way that organisms learn, interact, and transmit knowledge, and that what facilitates or enables this programmability is the learning and use of language. We then examine how language programs the mind and argue that it does so through the manipulation of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Meaning in Nature: Organic Manufacture? [REVIEW]Stephen J. Cowley - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):85-98.
    The paper examines Marcello Barbieri’s (2007) Introduction to Biosemiotics. Highlighting debate within the biosemiotic community, it focuses on what the volume offers to those who explain human intellect in relation to what Turing called our ‘physical powers.’ In scrutinising the basis of world-modelling, parallels and contrasts are drawn with other work on embodied-embedded cognition. Models dominate biology. Is this a qualitative fact or does it point to biomechanisms? In evaluating the 18 contributions, it is suggested that the answers will shape (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations