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  1. Social Relationship of a Firm and the CSP–CFP Relationship in Japan: Using Artificial Neural Networks.Daisuke Okamoto - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):117-132.
    As a criterion of a good firm, a lucrative and growing business has been said to be important. Recently, however, high profitability and high growth potential are insufficient for the criteria, because social influences exerted by recent firms have been extremely significant. In this paper, high social relationship is added to the list of the criteria. Empirical corporate social performance versus corporate financial performance (CSP–CFP) relationship studies that consider social relationship are very limited in Japan, and there are no definite (...)
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  • MNC Strategic Responses to Ethical Pressure: An Institutional Logic Perspective.Justin Tan & Liang Wang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):373-390.
    In this study, we aim to investigate how multinational corporations (MNCs) balance ethical pressures from both the home and host countries. Drawing on theories from institutional theory, international business, and business ethics, we build a theoretical framework to explain the ethical behavior of MNCs. We apply the institutional logic concept to examine how MNCs with established logics and principles that have grown in the home country respond to local ethical expectations in the host country. We differentiate the core values from (...)
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  • Exploring the Nature of the Relationship Between CSR and Competitiveness.Marc Vilanova, Josep Maria Lozano & Daniel Arenas - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (S1):57-69.
    This paper explores the nature of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness. We start with the commonly held view that firm competitiveness is defined by the market. That is, the question of what are the critical competitiveness factors is answered by looking at how companies and financial analysts describe and evaluate a firm. To analyze this, we review the current state of the art on the relationship between CSR and competitiveness. Second, CSR criteria used by financial analysts (...)
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  • A Stakeholder Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility: A Fresh Perspective Into Theory and Practice.Dima Jamali - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):213-231.
    Stakeholder theory has gained currency in the business and society literature in recent years in light␣of its practicality from the perspective of managers and scholars. In accounting for the recent ascendancy of␣stakeholder theory, this article presents an overview of␣two traditional conceptualizations of corporate social␣responsibility (CSR) (Carroll: 1979, ‹A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance', The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505 and Wood: 1991, ‹Corporate Social Performance Revisited', The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717), highlighting their predominant inclination toward providing (...)
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  • “AIDS is Not a Business”: A Study in Global Corporate Responsibility – Securing Access to Low-Cost HIV Medications.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):65-75.
    At the end of the 1990s, Brazil was faced with a potentially explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic. Through an innovative and multifaceted campaign, and despite initial resistance from multinational pharmaceutical companies, the government of Brazil was able to negotiate price reductions for HIV medications and develop local production capacity, thereby averting a public health disaster. Using interview data and document analysis, the authors show that the exercise of corporate social responsibility can be viewed in practice as a dynamic negotiation and an interaction (...)
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  • Slipstreaming the Larger Boats: Social Responsibility in Medium-Sized Businesses.Lutz Preuss & Jack Perschke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):531-551.
    Studies into corporate social responsibility (CSR) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have suggested that small businesses are different to the large companies on which CSR research usually focusses. Extending this argument, this article raises the question what differences in approaches to CSR there are within the SME category. Analysing the CSR strategy and performance of a medium-sized fashion retailer in the United Kingdom through manager interviews as well as customer and employee surveys, the article develops an analytical framework of (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in the Supply Chain: An Application in the Food Industry.Michael J. Maloni & Michael E. Brown - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):35-52.
    The food industry faces many significant risks from public criticism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the supply chain. This paper draws upon previous research and emerging industry trends to develop a comprehensive framework of supply chain CSR in the industry. The framework details unique CSR applications in the food supply chain including animal welfare, biotechnology, environment, fair trade, health and safety, and labor and human rights. General supply chain CSR issues such as community and procurement are also considered. (...)
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  • Value Priorities as Combining Core Factors Between CSR and Reputation – A Qualitative Study.Marjo Elisa Siltaoja - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):91-111.
    This article explores the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate reputation using qualitative research approach. Specifically, the relationship between CSR and corporate reputation is examined from the viewpoint of value theory. This paper brings up for discussion the various value priorities lying in the background of CSR actions. The aim is to form categories of value priorities around CSR and reputation, based on qualitative research approach. The main concepts in this paper – CSR, reputation and value – are (...)
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