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Feminist Ethics

(ed.)
University of Kansas (1991)

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  1. The Ethical Dimension of Work: A Feminist Perspective.Sabine Gürtler - 2005 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 20 (2):119-134.
  • Why Should a Knower Care?Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):34--52.
    This paper argues that the concept of care is significant not only for ethics, but for epistemology as well. After elucidating caring as a five-step dyadic relation, I go on to show its epistemic significance within the general framework of virtue epistemology as developed by Ernest Sosa, Alvin Goldman, and Linda Zagzebski. The notions of "care-knowing" and "care-based epistemology" emerge from construing caring (respectively) as a reliabilist and responsibilist virtue.
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  • Autonomy, Gendered Subordination and Transcultural Dialogue.Sumi Madhok - 2007 - Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):335 – 357.
    This paper is a theoretical and empirical investigation into whether persons in subordinate social contexts possess agency and if they do, how do we recognise and recover their agency given the oppressive conditions of their lives. It aims to achieve this through forging closer links between the philosophical arguments and the ethnographic evidence of women's agency. Through such an exercise, this paper hopes to bridge the existing gap between feminist theoretical interventions and feminist politics as well as to increase 'sociological (...)
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  • Thinking Morality Interpersonally: A Reply to Burgess-Jackson.Margaret Urban Walker - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):167-173.
    In a comment on my paper "Feminism, Ethics, and the Question of Theory", Keith Burgess-Jackson argues that I have misdiagnosed the problem with modern moral theory. Burgess-Jackson misunderstands both the illustrative-"theoretical-juridical"-model I constructed there and how my critique and alternative model answer to specifically feminist concerns. Ironically, his own view seems to reproduce the very conception of morality as an individually internalized action-guiding code of principles that my earlier essay argued is the conception central to modern moral theories.
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  • Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Think No Evil: Ethics and the Appeal to Experience.Paul Lauritzen - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):83 - 104.
    This essay distinguishes three types of appeals to experience in ethics, identifies problems with appealing to experience, and argues that appeals to experience must be open to critical assessment, if experientially-based arguments are to be useful. Unless competing and potentially irreconcilable experiences can be assessed and adjudicated, experientially-based arguments will be problematic. The paper recommends thinking of the appeal to experience as a kind of storytelling to be evaluated as other stories are.
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  • The Confucian Concept of Jen and the Feminist Ethics of Care: A Comparative Study.Chenyang Li - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):70 - 89.
    This article compares Confucian ethics of Jen and feminist ethics of care. It attempts to show that they share philosophically significant common grounds. Its findings affirm the view that care-orientation in ethics is not a characteristic peculiar to one sex. It also shows that care-orientation is not peculiar to subordinated social groups. Arguing that the oppression of women is not an essential element of Confucian ethics, the author indicates the Confucianism and feminism are compatible.
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  • The Ethic of Care Vis-À-Vis the Ethic of Rights: A Problem for Contemporary Moral Theory.Joy Kroeger-Mappes - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):108 - 131.
    Carol Gilligan has delineated two ethics, the ethic of rights and the ethic of care. In this article I argue that the two ethics are part of one overall system, the ethic of care functioning as a necessary base for the ethic of rights. I also argue that the system is seriously flawed. Because women are held accountable to both ethics and because the two ethics frequently conflict, women recurrently find themselves in a moral double bind.
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  • On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics.Janet Borgerson - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  • Why Should a Knower Care?Vrinda Dalmiya - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):34-52.
    This paper argues that the concept of care is significant not only for ethics, but for epistemology as well. After elucidating caring as a five-step dyadic relation, I go on to show its epistemic significance within the general framework of virtue epistemology as developed by Ernest Sosa, Alvin Goldman, and Linda Zagzebski. The notions of "care-knowing" and "care-based epistemology" emerge from construing caring as a reliabilist and responsibilist virtue.
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  • If Men Could Get Pregnant: Beth Singer and Carol Gilligan on Abortion.Mary Magada-Ward - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (4):421-430.
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  • Justice, Care, and Questionable Dichotomies.Jean P. Rumsey - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):99 - 113.
    Throughout the development of an "ethic of care" different from an "ethic of justice," the relationship between the two has been problematic. Are they theories between which one must choose? Are they complementary? Are they domain-specific? In support of my view that neither is adequate by itself, I here examine the private domain of care of the dying by intimates, and find there important issues both of care and of justice.
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  • In Praise of Blame.Barbara Houston - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (4):128 - 147.
    Recent writers in feminist ethics have been concerned to find ways to reclaim and augment women's moral agency. This essay considers Sarah Hoagland's intriguing suggestion that we renounce moral praise and blame and pursue what she calls an "ethic of intelligibility." I argue that the eschewal of moral blame would not help but rather hinder our efforts to increase our sense of moral agency. It would, I claim, further intensify our demoralization.
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  • New Directions in Feminist Ethics.Monique Deveaux - 1995 - European Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):86-96.
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  • Recent Work in Feminist Ethics.Brennan Samantha - 1999 - Ethics 109 (4):858-893.
    This article surveys recent feminist contributions to moral philosophy with an emphasis on those works which engage with debates within mainstream ethics. The article begins by examining a tension said to arise from the two criteria a theory must meet if it is to count as feminist moral theory: the women's experience requirement and the feminist conclusion requirement. Subsequent sections deal with feminist relational theories of rights, feminist work on responsibility and feminist contractarian approaches to ethics. A final section looks (...)
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  • The Opinions of Men and Women: Toward a Different Configuration of Moral Voices.Nancy J. Holland - 1993 - Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):65-80.
  • The Ethic of Care Vis-'-Vis the Ethic of Rights: A Problem for Contemporary Moral Theory.Joy Kroeger-Mappes - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):108-131.
    Carol Gilligan has delineated two ethics, the ethic of rights and the ethic of care. In this article I argue that the two ethics are part of one overall system, the ethic of care functioning as a necessary base for the ethic of rights. I also argue that the system is seriously flawed. Because women are held accountable to both ethics and because the two ethics frequently conflict, women recurrently find themselves in a moral double bind.
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  • Why Care About Gender?Ann Garry - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):155-161.
    I address motivations that feminist philosophers have for being concerned about the "maleness" of philosophy and the "problem of difference" within feminist theory. An appropriate motivation for caring about both sets of issues is the desire not to oppress others. In order to be able to understand this motivation and to act on it, we need to retain gender as an analytical category.
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  • Introduction.Kathryn J. Norlock & Andrea Veltman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):3-8.
    Summary: An introduction to this special issue of Hypatia, in which feminist philosophers analyze, critically engage, and extend several predominant ideas in the work of Claudia Card. Authors in this collection include Lisa Tessman, Marilyn Friedman, Hilde Lindemann, Sheryl Tuttle Ross, Joan Callahan, David Concepción, Kathryn Norlock and Jean Rumsey (co-authors), Linda Bell, Samantha Brennan, and Victoria Davion.
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  • The Ethical Dimension of Work: A Feminist Perspective.Sabine Gürtler & tr Smith, Andrew F. - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (2):119-134.
    : My contribution intends to show that the traditional philosophical concept of work (Marx, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marcuse, Arendt, Habermas, and the rest) leaves out a crucial dimension. Work is reduced, for example, to the interaction with nature, the problem of recognition, or economic self-preservation. But work also establishes an ethical relation having to do with the needs of others and to the common good—a view of work that should be of particular interest for feminist and gender philosophy. This dimension makes (...)
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