Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Single Combat in the Roman Republic.S. P. Oakley - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):392-410.
    In his discussion of Roman military institutions Polybius described how the desire for fame might inspire Roman soldiers to heroic feats of bravery, including single combat: τ δ μέγιστον, ο νέοι παρορμνται πρς τ πν πομένειν πρ τν κοινν πραγμάτων χάριν το τυχεν τς συνακολουθούσης τος γαθος τν νδρν εκλείας. πίστιν δ' χει τ λεγόμενον κ τούτων. πολλο μν γρ μονο-μάχησαν κουσίως ωμαίων πρ τς τν λων κρίσεως κτλ. Modern scholars, however, have taken little notice of this remark and some (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Single Combat in the Roman Republic.S. P. Oakley - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (02):392-.
    In his discussion of Roman military institutions Polybius described how the desire for fame might inspire Roman soldiers to heroic feats of bravery, including single combat: τ δ μέγιστον, ο νέοι παρορμνται πρς τ πν πομένειν πρ τν κοινν πραγμάτων χάριν το τυχεν τς συνακολουθούσης τος γαθος τν νδρν εκλείας. πίστιν δ' χει τ λεγόμενον κ τούτων. πολλο μν γρ μονο-μάχησαν κουσίως ωμαίων πρ τς τν λων κρίσεως κτλ. Modern scholars, however, have taken little notice of this remark and some (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Framing the Gift: The Politics of the Siphnian Treasury at Delphi.Richard T. Neer - 2001 - Classical Antiquity 20 (2):273-344.
    Thêsauroi, or treasure-houses, are small, temple-like structures, found typically in the sanctuaries of Delphi and Olympia. They were built by Greek city-states to house the dedications of their citizens. But a thêsauros is not just a storeroom: it is also a frame for costly votives, a way of diverting elite display in the interest of the city. When placed on view in a treasure-house, the individual dedication is re-contextualized: although it still reflects well on its dedicant, it also glorifies the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Myth of the Hoplite's Hoplon.J. F. Lazenby & David Whitehead - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):27-.
    ‘Hoplites are troops who take their name from their shields’. ‘The individual infantryman took his name, hoplites, from the hoplon or shield’. Such is the orthodox view. This paper will endeavour to show that its basis is inadequate. Rather, we shall argue, hoplites took their name from their arms and armour as a whole, their hopla in that all-encompassing sense; so that the original and essential meaning of the word hoplite was nothing more than ‘armed man’.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • General Bibliography.Peter Nicholson - 1978 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 2 (1):19-26.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anthropology and the Classics: War, Violence, and the Stateless Polis.Moshe Berent - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (1):257-289.
    I. INTRODUCTIONIt has become a commonplace in contemporary historiography to note the frequency of war in ancient Greece. Yvon Garlan says that, during the century and a half from the Persian wars to the battle of Chaeronea, Athens was at war, on average, more than two years out of every three, and never enjoyed a period of peace for as long as ten consecutive years. ‘Given these conditions’, says Garlan, ‘one would expect them to consider war as a problem …. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Hoplites and Heresies.A. J. Holladay - 1982 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:94-103.
  • Spartan Wives: Liberation or Licence?Paul Cartledge - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (1):84-105.
    The neologism ‘sexist’ has gained entry to an Oxford Dictionary, The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English, third edition, where it is defined as ‘derisive of the female sex and expressive of masculine superiority’. Thus ‘sexpot’ and ‘sex kitten’, which are still defined in exclusively feminine terms in the fifth edition of The Concise Oxford Dictionary, have finally met their lexicographical match. This point about current English usage has of course a serious, and general, application. For language reflects, when it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Mardonius' Senseless Greeks.Roel Konijnendijk - 2016 - Classical Quarterly 66 (1):1-12.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark