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  1. Obedience and Evil: From Milgram and Kampuchea to Normal Organizations.Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):291 - 309.
    Obedience: a simple term. Stanley Milgram, the famous experimental social psychologist, shocked the world with theory about it. Another man, Pol Pot, the infamous leader of the Khmer Rouge, showed how far the desire for obedience could go in human societies. Milgram conducted his experiments in the controlled environment of the US psychology laboratory of the 1960s. Pol Pot experimented with Utopia in the totalitarian Kampuchea of the 1970s. In this article, we discuss the process through which the Khmer Rouge (...)
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  • “My Attitude Made Me Do It”: Considering the Agency of Attitudes. [REVIEW]Mark van Vuuren & François Cooren - 2010 - Human Studies 33 (1):85-101.
    In proposing a next step in loosening the restriction of action to humans, this paper explores what we call the agency of attitudes and especially the ethical and practical questions that such recognition should entail. In line with Actor-Network Theory, we suggest that attitudes, passions and emotions can be seen to have agency in a similar vein as tangible agents (e.g., technological devices, texts, machines). We illustrate this suggestion using an example of socialization towards pain experienced during sports. Finally, we (...)
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  • “My Attitude Made Me Do It”: Considering the Agency of Attitudes.Mark van Vuuren & François Cooren - 2010 - Human Studies 33 (1):85 - 101.
    In proposing a next step in loosening the restriction of action to humans, this paper explores what we call the agency of attitudes and especially the ethical and practical questions that such recognition should entail. In line with Actor-Network Theory, we suggest that attitudes, passions and emotions can be seen to have agency in a similar vein as tangible agents (e.g., technological devices, texts, machines). We illustrate this suggestion using an example of socialization towards pain experienced during sports. Finally, we (...)
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  • Mutually Enhancing Responsibility: A Theoretical Exploration of the Interaction Mechanisms Between Individual and Corporate Moral Responsibility.Muel Kaptein & Mihaela Constantinescu - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):325-339.
    Moral responsibility for outcomes in corporate settings can be ascribed either to the individual members, the corporation, or both. In the latter case, the relationship between individual and corporate responsibility has been approached as inversely proportional, such that an increase in individual responsibility leads to a corresponding decrease in corporate responsibility and vice versa. In this article, we develop a non-proportionate approach, where, under specific conditions, individual and corporate moral responsibilities interact dynamically, leading to a mutual enhancement of responsibility: the (...)
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  • Changes in Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Held by Former South African Business Management Students.Gavin Price & Andries Johannes Walt - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):429-440.
    The objective of this study was to assess whether, and how, the attitudes towards business ethics of former South African business students have changed between the early 1990s and 2010. The study used the Attitudes Toward Business Ethics Questionnaire and applied a comparative analysis between leading business schools in South Africa. The findings of this study found a significant change in attitudes based on a set time frame, with a trend towards stronger opinions on business ethics and espoused values. Eleven (...)
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  • The Problem of Humiliation in Peer Review.Debra R. Comer & Michael Schwartz - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (2):141-156.
    This paper examines the problem of vituperative feedback from peer reviewers. We argue that such feedback is morally unacceptable, insofar as it humiliates authors and damages their dignity. We draw from social-psychological research to explore those aspects of the peer-review process in general and the anonymity of blind reviewing in particular that contribute to reviewers’ humiliating comments. We then apply Iris Murdoch's ideas about a virtuous consciousness and humility to make the case that peer referees have a moral obligation not (...)
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  • Rethinking Responsible Agency in Corporations: Perspectives From Deleuze and Guattari. [REVIEW]Mollie Painter-Morland - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):83-95.
    The notion of “responsibility” can be understood in a number of different ways, namely as being accountable for one’s actions, as a personal trait, or as a task or duty that results from one’s role. In this article we will challenge the assumptions that underpin each of these employments of the word “responsibility” and seek to redefine the concept as such. The main thrust of the argument is that we need to critically interrogate the idea of “identity” and deliberate decision-making (...)
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  • The Dissolution of Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations: A Comprehensive Review and Model. [REVIEW]Ralph W. Jackson, Charles M. Wood & James J. Zboja - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):233-250.
    The purpose of this research is to present the major factors that lead to ethical dissolution in an organization. Specifically, drawing from a wide spectrum of sources, this study explores the impact of organizational, individual, and contextual factors that converge to contribute to ethical dissolution. Acknowledging that ethical decisions are, in the final analysis, made by individuals, this study presents a model of ethical dissolution that gives insight into how a variety of elements coalesce to draw individuals into decisions that (...)
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  • Changes in Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Held by Former South African Business Management Students.Gavin Price & Andries Johannes van der Walt - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):429-440.
    The objective of this study was to assess whether, and how, the attitudes towards business ethics of former South African business students have changed between the early 1990s and 2010. The study used the Attitudes Toward Business Ethics Questionnaire and applied a comparative analysis between leading business schools in South Africa. The findings of this study found a significant change in attitudes based on a set time frame, with a trend towards stronger opinions on business ethics and espoused values. Eleven (...)
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  • Obedience and Evil: From Milgram and Kampuchea to Normal Organizations. [REVIEW]Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):291-309.
    Obedience: a simple term. Stanley Milgram, the famous experimental social psychologist, shocked the world with theory about it. Another man, Pol Pot, the infamous leader of the Khmer Rouge, showed how far the desire for obedience could go in human societies. Milgram conducted his experiments in the controlled environment of the US psychology laboratory of the 1960s. Pol Pot experimented with Utopia in the totalitarian Kampuchea of the 1970s. In this article, we discuss the process through which the Khmer Rouge (...)
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  • In Search of Individual Responsibility: The Dark Side of Organizations in the Light of Jansenist Ethics.Ghislain Deslandes - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):61-70.
    In showing how the bureaucratic space negatively influences the moral conscience of managers, Robert Jackall’s sociological writings have pointed up one of the darkest sides of organizations. In fact, in the business ethics literature there is much to support Jackall’s pessimistic contentions, suggesting that bureaucracy can rob individual managers of their sense of responsibility. How then can this space for individual freedom, so essential in re-establishing responsible management, be recreated? In order to answer this question, we propose to interpret Jackall’s (...)
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