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  1. Should Phenomenological Approaches to Illness Be Wary of Naturalism?Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 73:10-18.
    In some quarters within philosophy of medicine, more particularly in the phenomenological approaches, naturalism is looked upon with suspicion. This paper argues, first, that it is necessary to distinguish between two expressions of this attitude towards naturalism: phenomenological approaches to illness disagree with naturalism regarding various theoretical claims and they disapprove of naturalism on an ethical level. Second, this paper argues that both the disagreement with and the disapproval of naturalism are to a large extent confused. It then offers some (...)
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  • Clinical Sympathy: The Important Role of Affectivity in Clinical Practice.Carter Hardy - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):499-513.
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  • When Reactivity Fails: The Limited Effects of Hospital Rankings.Christopher Dorn - 2019 - Social Science Information 58 (2):327-353.
    Recent research has advanced the idea that modern society is replete with numerous measuring activities that evaluate the performance of individuals and organisations. Both the research and the application of such measures suggest that the scrutinised actors will internalise the expectations associated with these measures and adjust their behaviour accordingly. Usually these expectations involve both technical and moral demands aimed at improving the evaluated activities so as to make them more beneficial, efficient, and transparent for the consumer and society in (...)
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  • Logos, Ethos and Pathos in Balance.Jonathan Fuller - 2014 - European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare 2 (1):22-29.
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  • Consideraciones críticas de la noción de cuerpo propio.Paula Diaz Romero - 2019 - Ideas Y Valores 68 (170):187-203.
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  • Critical Medical Humanities: Embracing Entanglement, Taking Risks.William Viney, Felicity Callard & Angela Woods - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (1):2-7.
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  • A New Path for Humanistic Medicine.Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (1):57-77.
    According to recent approaches in the philosophy of medicine, biomedicine should be replaced or complemented by a humanistic medical model. Two humanistic approaches, narrative medicine and the phenomenology of medicine, have grown particularly popular in recent decades. This paper first suggests that these humanistic criticisms of biomedicine are insufficient. A central problem is that both approaches seem to offer a straw man definition of biomedicine. It then argues that the subsequent definition of humanism found in these approaches is problematically reduced (...)
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  • Dialogic Consensus in Medicine—A Justification Claim.Paul Walker & Terence Lovat - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):71-84.
    The historical emphasis of medical ethics, based on substantive frameworks and principles derived from them, is no longer seen as sufficiently sensitive to the moral pluralism characteristic of our current era. We argue that moral decision-making in clinical situations is more properly derived from a process of dialogic consensus. This process entails an inclusive, noncoercive, and self-reflective dialogue within the community affected. In order to justify this approach, we make two claims—the first epistemic, and the second normative. The epistemic claim (...)
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  • Confronting Diminished Epistemic Privilege and Epistemic Injustice in Pregnancy by Challenging a “Panoptics of the Womb”.Lauren Freeman - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (1):44-68.
    This paper demonstrates how the problematic kinds of epistemic power that physicians have can diminish the epistemic privilege that pregnant women have over their bodies and can put them in a state of epistemic powerlessness. This result, I argue, constitutes an epistemic injustice for many pregnant women. A reconsideration of how we understand and care for pregnant women and of the physician–patient relationship can provide us with a valuable context and starting point for helping to alleviate the knowledge/power problems that (...)
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  • On the Downplay of Suffering in Nordenfelt’s Theory of Illness.Bjørn Hofmann - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (4):283-297.
    In his influential theory of health Nordenfelt bases the concepts of health and illness on the notions of ability and disability. A premise for this is that ability and disability provide a more promising, adequate, and useful basis than well-being and suffering. Nordenfelt uses coma and manic episodes as paradigm cases to show that this is so. Do these paradigm cases (and thus the premise) hold? What consequences does it have for the theory of health and illness if it they (...)
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  • 'I've Never Been Surrounded by so Many People and Felt so Alone' : A Heideggerian Phenomenological Study Investigating Patients' Experiences of Technology in Adult Intensive Care.Louise C. Stayt - unknown
    Research Question: What are patients’ experiences of technology in adult intensive care? Research Objectives: -To explore patients’ perceptions of receiving care in a technological environment -To explore patients’ perceptions of how technology has influenced their experience of care Background: Technology is fundamental to the physical recovery of critically ill patients in intensive care (ICU), however, there is a suggestion in the literature that its presence may dehumanise patient care and distract the nurse from attending to patients’ psychosocial needs. Little attention (...)
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  • A Phenomenological Approach to Clinical Empathy: Rethinking Empathy Within its Intersubjective and Affective Contexts.Hardy Carter - 2017 - Dissertation, University of South Florida
    This dissertation contributes to the philosophy of empathy and biomedical ethics by drawing on phenomenological approaches to empathy, intersubjectivity, and affectivity in order to contest the primacy of the intersubjective aspect of empathy at the cost of its affective aspect. Both aspects need to be explained in order for empathy to be accurately understood in philosophical works, as well as practically useful for patient care in biomedical ethics. In the first chapter, I examine the current state of clinical empathy in (...)
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  • A Feminist Contestation of Ableist Assumptions: Implications for Biomedical Ethics, Disability Theory, and Phenomenology.Christine Marie Wieseler - unknown
    This dissertation contributes to the development of philosophy of disability by drawing on disability studies, feminist philosophy, phenomenology, and philosophy of biology in order to contest epistemic and ontological assumptions about disability within biomedical ethics as well as within philosophical work on the body, demonstrating how philosophical inquiry is radically transformed when experiences of disability are taken seriously. In the first two chapters, I focus on epistemological and ontological concerns surrounding disability within biomedical ethics. Although disabled people and their advocates (...)
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  • At the Intersection of Self and Not-Self: Finding the Locus of ‘Self’ in Autoimmunity.James David Katz - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (2):137-139.
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  • What It Means to Care for a Person with a Chronic Disease: Integrating the Patient’s Experience Into the Medical Viewpoint.Marie Gaille - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  • Putting Phenomenology in its Place: Some Limits of a Phenomenology of Medicine.Jonathan Sholl - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (6):391-410.
    Several philosophers have recently argued that phenomenology is well-suited to help understand the concepts of health, disease, and illness. The general claim is that by better analysing how illness appears to or is experienced by ill individuals—incorporating the first-person perspective—some limitations of what is seen as the currently dominant third-person or ‘naturalistic’ approaches to understand health and disease can be overcome. In this article, after discussing some of the main insights and benefits of the phenomenological approach, I develop three general (...)
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  • What is Called Symptom?Thor Eirik Eriksen & Mette Bech Risør - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):89-102.
    There is one concept in medicine which is prominent, the symptom. The omnipresence of the symptom seems, however, not to be reflected by an equally prominent curiosity aimed at investigating this concept as a phenomenon. In classic, traditional or conventional medical diagnostics and treatment, the lack of distinction with respect to the symptom represents a minor problem. Faced with enigmatic conditions and their accompanying labels such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, medically unexplained symptoms, and functional somatic syndromes, the contestation of (...)
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  • Examining Carceral Medicine Through Critical Phenomenology.Andrea J. Pitts - 2018 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):14-35.
    In "Medicine and Colonialism," Frantz Fanon critically implicates several impasses that arise from the provision of medicine under contexts of colonialism. His essay offers a critical appraisal of medical care in Algeria from the perspective of a health care provider who is himself also subject to racist hierarchies of difference under French colonial rule. Drawing from his experiences as a clinician, Fanon argues that developing trusting relationships of care between patients and providers often becomes nearly impossible under conditions of colonial (...)
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  • Introduction: Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health.Lauren Freeman - 2018 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):1-13.
    Although by no means mainstream, phenomenological approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine are no longer novel. Such approaches take the lived body —as opposed to the body understood as a material, biological object —as their point of departure to offer a more robust understanding of a plurality of experiences that go far beyond those surrounding disease...
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  • Disconnectedness From the Here-and-Now: A Phenomenological Perspective as a Counteract on the Medicalisation of Death Wishes in Elderly People.Els van Wijngaarden, Carlo Leget & Anne Goossensen - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):265-273.
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  • Is It Possible to “Incorporate” a Scar? Revisiting a Basic Concept in Phenomenology.Jenny Slatman - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):347-363.
    Although scars never disappear completely, in time most people will basically get used to them. In this paper I explore what it means to habituate to scars against the background of the phenomenological concept of incorporation. In phenomenology the body as Leib or corps vécu functions as a transcendental condition for world disclosure. Because of this transcendental reasoning, phenomenology prioritizes a form of embodied subjectivity that is virtually dis-embodied. Endowing meaning to one’s world through getting engaged in actions and projects (...)
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  • Giving Voice to Vulnerable People: The Value of Shadowing for Phenomenological Healthcare Research. [REVIEW]Hanneke van der Meide, Carlo Leget & Gert Olthuis - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):731-737.
    Phenomenological healthcare research should include the lived experiences of a broad group of healthcare users. In this paper it is shown how shadowing can give a voice to people in vulnerable situations who are often excluded from interview studies. Shadowing is an observational method in which the researcher observes an individual during a relatively long time. Central aspects of the method are the focus on meaning expressed by the whole body, and an extended stay of the researcher in the phenomenal (...)
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  • Re-Evaluating Concepts of Biological Function in Clinical Medicine: Towards a New Naturalistic Theory of Disease.Benjamin Chin-Yee & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):245-264.
    Naturalistic theories of disease appeal to concepts of biological function, and use the notion of dysfunction as the basis of their definitions. Debates in the philosophy of biology demonstrate how attributing functions in organisms and establishing the function-dysfunction distinction is by no means straightforward. This problematization of functional ascription has undermined naturalistic theories and led some authors to abandon the concept of dysfunction, favoring instead definitions based in normative criteria or phenomenological approaches. Although this work has enhanced our understanding of (...)
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  • Retracted Article: What It Means to Care for a Person with a Chronic Disease: Integrating the Patient’s Experience Into the Medical Viewpoint.Marie Gaille - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (3):439-439.
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  • The Patient's Voice in DBS Research: Advancing the Discussion Through Methodological Rigor.Merlin Bittlinger - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):118-120.
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  • Why Human Germline Editing is More Problematic Than Selecting Between Embryos: Ethically Considering Intergenerational Relationships.Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (1):9-25.
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  • Why Frailty Needs Vulnerability.H. van der Meide, G. Olthuis & C. Leget - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (8):860-869.
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  • Multiple Dimensions of Embodiment in Medical Practices.Jenny Slatman - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):549-557.
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  • Narrating the Self-Injured Body.A. Chandler - 2014 - Medical Humanities 40 (2):111-116.
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  • The Philosophical Role of Illness.Havi Carel - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (1):20-40.
    This article examines the philosophical role of illness. It briefly surveys the philosophical role accorded to illness in the history of philosophy and explains why illness merits such a role. It suggests that illness modifies, and thus sheds light on, normal experience, revealing its ordinary and therefore overlooked structure. Illness also provides an opportunity for reflection by performing a kind of suspension (epoché) of previously held beliefs, including tacit beliefs. The article argues that these characteristics warrant a philosophical role for (...)
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