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  1. Change Your Look, Change Your Luck: Religious Self-Transformation and Brute Luck Egalitarianism.Muhammad Velji - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (2):453-471.
    My intention in this paper is to reframe the practice of veiling as an embodied practice of self-development and self- transformation. I argue that practices like these cannot be handled by the choice/chance distinction relied on by those who would restrict religious minority accommodations. Embodied self- transformation necessarily means a change in personal identity and this means the religious believer cannot know if they will need religious accommodation when they begin their journey of piety. Even some luck egalitarians would find (...)
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  • Challenging the Genteel Supports of Atrocities: A Response to The Atrocity Paradigm.Linda A. Bell - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):123 - 140.
    Inspired by Card's focus on atrocities, I reflect on attitudes and behaviors that buttress and support evil. Surely, the frequent anti-Semitic sermons in German churches helped to form and later to support the views of both Nazis and those who accepted and cooperated with them. Similarly, lynching, rape, and abuse occur within societies whose structures and laws reflect dominant, generally "genteel" racism and sexism and, in turn, help create perpetrators and at least somewhat sympathetic onlookers.
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  • 'There but for the Grace of God': Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness.Pamela Bjorklund - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):188-200.
  • The Abused Mind: Feminist Theory, Psychiatric Disability, and Trauma.Andrea Nicki - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):80-104.
    I show how much psychiatric disability is informed by trauma, marginalization, sexist norms, social inequalities, concepts of irrationality and normalcy, oppositional mind-body dualism, and mainstream moral values. Drawing on feminist discussion of physical disability, I present a feminist theory of psychiatric disability that serves to liberate not only those who are psychiatrically disabled but also the mind and moral consciousness restricted in their ranges of rational possibilities.
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  • When Strangers Call: A Consideration of Care, Justice, and Compassion.Chris Frakes - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):79 - 99.
    How ought we to respond to strangers in imminent need? Many people suggest that we need justice to temper the partiality of care. In this paper 1 argue that neither care nor justice adequately motivates attention to the suffering of strangers. Rather, a different virtue, compassion grounded in equanimity, is required. I demonstrate that the virtue of compassion alhws the agent to sustain her engagement with suffering strangers without sacrificing her own flourishing.
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  • Idealizing Morality.Lisa Tessman - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):797 - 824.
    Implicit in feminist and other critiques of ideal theorizing is a particular view of what normative theory should be like. Although I agree with the rejection of ideal theorizing that oppression theorists (and other theorists of justice) have advocated, the proposed alternative of nonideal theorizing is also problematic. Nonideal theorizing permits one to address oppression by first describing (nonideal) oppressive conditions, and then prescribing the best action that is possible or feasible given the conditions. Borrowing an insight from the "moral (...)
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  • Overcoming Oppressive Self-Blame: Gray Agency in Underground Railroads.David W. Concepción - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):81 - 99.
    After describing some key features of life in an underground railroad and the nature of gray agency, Concepción illustrates how survivors of relationship slavery can stop levying misplaced blame on themselves without giving up the valuable practice of blaming. Concepción concludes that by choosing a relatively non-oppressive account of self-blame, some amount of internalized oppression can be overcome and the double bind of agency-denial and self-loathing associated with being an oppressively grafted agent can be reduced.
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  • A Problem for Moral Luck.Steven D. Hales - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2385-2403.
    The present paper poses a new problem for moral luck. Defenders of moral luck uncritically rely on a broader theory of luck known as the control theory or the lack of control theory. However, there are are two other analyses of luck in the literature that dominate discussion in epistemology, namely the probability and modal theories. However, moral luck is nonexistent under the probability and modal accounts, but the control theory cannot explain epistemic luck. While some have posited that “luck” (...)
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  • Feminist Virtue Ethics, Happiness, and Moral Luck.Marilyn Friedman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):29 - 40.
    Can men who dominate women nevertheless be happy or lead flourishing lives? Building on Claudia Card's exploration of moral luck, this paper considers the belief that male dominators cannot be happy. The discussion ranges over both virtue theory and empirical research into the "belief in a just world." I conclude that there are reasons to avoid believing that male dominators cannot be happy or flourish, and that feminism does not need that belief.
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  • Virtue Ethics, Social Difference, and the Challenge of an Embodied Politics.Shannon Dunn - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):27-49.
    Following the revival of virtue theory, some moral theorists have argued that virtue ethics can provide the basis for a radical politics. Such a politics essentially departs from the liberal model of the moral agent as an autonomous reason-giver. It instead privileges an understanding of the agent as conditioned by her community, and in the case of social oppression and marginalization, communal virtues may become a vehicle for social change. This essay compares political appropriations of virtue theory by Christian theologian (...)
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  • Bodily Disorientation and Moral Change.Ami Harbin - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):261-280.
    Neglect of the moral promise of disorientation is a persistent gap in even the most sophisticated philosophies of embodiment. In this article, I begin to correct this neglect by expanding our sense of the range and nature of disoriented experience and proposing new visions of disorientation as benefiting moral agency. Disorientations are experienced through complex interactions of corporeal, affective, and cognitive processes, and are characterized by feelings of shock, surprise, unease, and discomfort; felt disorientations almost always make us unsure of (...)
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  • The Problem of Moral Luck: An Argument Against its Epistemic Reduction.Anders Schinkel - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (3):267-277.
    Whom I call ‘epistemic reductionists’ in this article are critics of the notion of ‘moral luck’ that maintain that all supposed cases of moral luck are illusory; they are in fact cases of what I describe as a special form of epistemic luck, the only difference lying in what we get to know about someone, rather than in what (s)he deserves in terms of praise or blame. I argue that epistemic reductionists are mistaken. They implausibly separate judgements of character from (...)
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  • Surviving Long-Term Mass Atrocities1.Claudia Card - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):35-52.
  • Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):156-173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  • Moral Feedback and Motivation: Revisiting the Undermining Effect.Elise Springer - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):407-423.
    Social psychologists have evidence that evaluative feedback on others’ choices sometimes has unwelcome negative effects on hearers’ motivation. Holroyd’s article (Holroyd J. Ethical Theory Moral Pract 10:267–278, 2007) draws attention to one such result, the undermining effect, that should help to challenge moral philosophers’ complacency about blame and praise. The cause for concern is actually greater than she indicates, both because there are multiple kinds of negative effect on hearer motivation, and because these are not, as she hopes, reliably counteracted (...)
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  • Coming Down to Earth on Cloning: An Ecofeminist Analysis of Homophobia in the Current Debate.Victoria Davion - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):58-76.
    In this essay, Davion argues that many arguments appealing to an "intuition" that reproductive cloning is morally wrong because it is "unnatural" rely upon an underlying moral assumption that only heterosexuality is "natural," an assumption that grounds extreme homophobia in America. Therefore, critics of cloning who are in favor of gay and lesbian equality have reasons to avoid prescriptive appeals to the so-called "natural" in making their arguments. Davion then suggests anticloning arguments that do not make such appeals.
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  • Violence and Publicity: Constructions of Political Responsibility After 9/11.Clive Barnett - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):353-375.
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  • The Abused Mind: Feminist Theory, Psychiatric Disability, and Trauma.Andrea Nicki - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):80-104.
    I show how much psychiatric disability is informed by trauma, marginalization, sexist norms, social inequalities, concepts of irrationality and normalcy, oppositional mind-body dualism, and mainstream moral values. Drawing on feminist discussion of physical disability, I present a feminist theory of psychiatric disability that serves to liberate not only those who are psychiatrically disabled but also the mind and moral consciousness restricted in their ranges of rational possibilities.
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  • Trust as an Instance of Asymmetrical Reciprocity: An Ethics Perspective on Corporate Brand Management.Clara Gustafsson - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (2):142–150.
  • "… but I Could Never Have One": The Abortion Intuition and Moral Luck.Hilde Lindemann - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):41 - 55.
    Starting from the intuition, shared by many women, that the legal right to an abortion must be defended but that they themselves could never undergo one, I offer an account of why pregnancy is morally valuable and why, nevertheless, it is often permissible to end one. Developing the idea that human pregnancy centrally involves the activity of calling a fetus into personhood, I argue that the permissibility of stopping this activity hinges on the goodness or badness of one's moral luck.
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  • On Not Making Ourselves the Prey of Others: Jean Hampton's Feminist Contractarianism. [REVIEW]Janice Richardson - 2007 - Feminist Legal Studies 15 (1):33-55.
    This article assesses Jean Hampton’s feminist contractarianism by considering the way in which she draws together the contradictory positions of Hobbes and Kant to produce a test for exploitation in personal relationships. The ways in which this work fits with her other analysis of retribution, gratitude and self-worth are examined. Hampton’s work is evaluated in the context of Carole Pateman’s argument that moral theories distract from the political analysis of who has a voice in relationships. Hampton’s work presumes the social (...)
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  • Raising Responsibility: Motherhood and Moral Luck.Sheryl Tuttle Ross - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):56-69.
    This paper extends Claudia Card's account of agency in the face of moral luck in order to theoretically ground the activities of feminist mothers who endeavor to raise responsible human beings. The paper addresses those who mother in gray areas—areas where mothers are victims of the evils of the institution of motherhood while having authority and influence over their children. -/- .
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  • On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics.Janet Borgerson - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  • Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker'sMoral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (1):156-173.
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  • Terrorism, Evil, and Everyday Depravity.Bat-ami Bar On - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):157-163.
    This essay expresses ambivalence about the use of the term "evil" in analyses of terrorism in light of the association of the two in speeches intended to justify the United States' "war on terrorism." At the same time, the essay suggests that terrorism can be regarded as "evil" but only when considered among a multiplicity of "evils" comparable to it, for example: rape, war crimes, and repression.
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  • Impure Agency and the Just War.Rosemary B. Kellison - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):317-341.
    Feminist critiques of intention challenge some aspects of traditional just war reasoning, including the criteria of right intention and discrimination. I take note of these challenges and propose some directions just war reasoners might take in response. First, right intention can be evaluated more accurately by judging what actors in war actually do than by attempting to uncover inward dispositions. Assessing whether agents in war have taken due care to minimize foreseeable collateral damage, avoided intentional targeting of noncombatants, corrected previous (...)
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  • Expecting Bad Luck.Lisa Tessman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):9-28.
    This paper draws on Claudia Card’s discussions of moral luck to consider the complicated moral life of people—described as pessimists—who accept the heavy knowledge of the predictability of the bad moral luck of oppression. The potential threat to ethics posed by this knowledge can be overcome by the pessimist whose resistance to oppression, even in the absence of hope, expresses a sense of still having a ‘‘claim’’ on flourishing despite its unattainability under oppression.
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  • Terrorism, Evil, and Everyday Depravity.Bat-ami Bar On - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):157-163.
    : This essay expresses ambivalence about the use of the term "evil" in analyses of terrorism in light of the association of the two in speeches intended to justify the United States' "war on terrorism." At the same time, the essay suggests that terrorism can be regarded as "evil" but only when considered among a multiplicity of "evils" comparable to it, for example: rape, war crimes, and repression.
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  • Challenging the Genteel Supports of Atrocities: A Response to The Atrocity Paradigm.Linda A. Bell - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):123-140.
  • The Atrocity Paradigm Applied to Environmental Evils.Kathryn Norlock - 2004 - Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):85-93.
    I am persuaded both by the theory of evil advanced by Claudia Card in The Atrocity Paradigm and by the idea that there are evils done to the environment; however, I argue that the theory of evil she describes has difficulty living up to her claim that it "can make sense of ecological evils the victims of which include trees and even ecosystems" (2002, 16). In this paper, I argue that Card's account of evil does not accommodate the kinds of (...)
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  • Recent Work in Feminist Ethics.Brennan Samantha - 1999 - Ethics 109 (4):858-893.
    This article surveys recent feminist contributions to moral philosophy with an emphasis on those works which engage with debates within mainstream ethics. The article begins by examining a tension said to arise from the two criteria a theory must meet if it is to count as feminist moral theory: the women's experience requirement and the feminist conclusion requirement. Subsequent sections deal with feminist relational theories of rights, feminist work on responsibility and feminist contractarian approaches to ethics. A final section looks (...)
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  • Infertility and Moral Luck: The Politics of Women Blaming Themselves for Infertility.Carolyn McLeod & Julie Ponesse - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):126-144.
    Infertility can be an agonizing experience, especially for women. And, much of the agony has to do with luck: with how unlucky one is in being infertile, and in how much luck is involved in determining whether one can weather the storm of infertility and perhaps have a child in the end. We argue that bad luck associated with being infertile is often bad moral luck for women. The infertile woman often blames herself or is blamed by others for what (...)
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  • Introduction: Special Issue on “Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil”.Robin May Schott - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
  • “… But I Could Never Have One”: The Abortion Intuition and Moral Luck.Hilde Lindemann - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):41-55.
  • Introduction: Special Issue On?Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil?Robin May Schott - 2003 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 18 (1):1-9.
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  • Trust as an Instance of Asymmetrical Reciprocity: An Ethics Perspective on Corporate Brand Management.Clara Gustafsson - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (2):142-150.
  • Coming Down to Earth on Cloning: An Ecofeminist Analysis of Homophobia in the Current Debate.Victoria Davion - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):58-76.
    : In this essay, Davion argues that many arguments appealing to an "intuition" that reproductive cloning is morally wrong because it is "unnatural" rely upon an underlying moral assumption that only heterosexuality is "natural," an assumption that grounds extreme homophobia in America. Therefore, critics of cloning who are in favor of gay and lesbian equality have reasons to avoid prescriptive appeals to the so-called "natural" in making their arguments. Davion then suggests anticloning arguments that do not make such appeals.
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  • Introduction.Kathryn J. Norlock & Andrea Veltman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):3-8.
    Summary: An introduction to this special issue of Hypatia, in which feminist philosophers analyze, critically engage, and extend several predominant ideas in the work of Claudia Card. Authors in this collection include Lisa Tessman, Marilyn Friedman, Hilde Lindemann, Sheryl Tuttle Ross, Joan Callahan, David Concepción, Kathryn Norlock and Jean Rumsey (co-authors), Linda Bell, Samantha Brennan, and Victoria Davion.
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  • Introduction: Special Issue on "Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil".Robin May Schott - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.