Switch to: References

Citations of:

Getting Back into Place

Human Studies 19 (4):433-439 (1996)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Towards a Phenomenology of Dyslexia.Matthew John Irvine Philpott - unknown
    In this thesis I apply Merleau-Ponty's brand of existential phenomenology to the developmental language disorder 'dyslexia'. Developmental dyslexia is marked by an unexpected failure to acquire written language skills, in particularly reading, spelling and aspects of writing, and has primarily been studied by experimental cognitive psychology, physiology, and more recently, the neurosciences. The current explanatory paradigm holds the view that symptoms of dyslexia are caused by deficits in phonological skills, in particularly verbal memory and phoneme awareness. As a means of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Place Spirituality.Victor Counted & Hetty Zock - 2019 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 41 (1):12-25.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Bodily Other and Everyday Experience of the Lived Urban World.Oren Bader & Aya Peri Bader - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 3 (2):93-109.
    This article explores the relationship between the bodily presence of other humans in the lived urban world and the experience of everyday architecture. We suggest, from the perspectives of phenomenology and architecture, that being in the company of others changes the way the built environment appears to subjects, and that this enables us to perform simple daily tasks while still attending to the built environment. Our analysis shows that in mundane urban settings attending to the environment involves a unique attentional (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Practice, Spatiality and Embodied Emotions: An Outline of a Geography of Practice.Kirsten Simonsen - 2007 - Human Affairs 17 (2).
  • Repetition and Difference: Lefebvre, le Corbusier and Modernity's (Im)Moral Landscape.Mick Smith - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):31 – 44.
    If, as Lefebvre argues, every society produces its own social space, then modernity might be characterized by that (anti-)social and instrumental space epitomized and idealized in Le Corbusier's writings. This repetitively patterned space consumes and regulates the differences between places and people; it encapsulates a normalizing morality that seeks to reduce all differences to an economic order of the Same. Lefebvre's dialectical conceptualization of 'difference' can both help explain the operation of this (im)moral landscape and offer the possibility of alternative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Place of the Elements and the Elements of Place: Aristotelian Contributions to Environmental Thought.David Macauley - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (2):187 – 206.
    I examine the ancient and perennial notion of the elements (stoicheia) and its relation to an idea of place proper (topos) and natural place (topos oikeios) in Aristotle's work. Through an exploration of his accounts, I argue that Aristotle develops a robust theory of place that is relevant to current environmental and geographical thought. In the process, he provides a domestic household and home for earth, air, fire and water that offers a supplement or an alternative to more abstract and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Not Easy Being Green: Process, Poetry and the Tyranny of Distance.Damon A. Young - 2002 - Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (3):189 – 204.
    There are many places that we must save from destruction. Sadly, they are mostly distant from us. If we accept Heidegger's notion of Being-in-the-World, this distance means that we cannot authentically speak of their Being. Even if we 'dwell' in our own lands, we are not 'at home' in these beautiful places. However, if we cannot speak of their Being, of what 'is', how can we ask logging and mining multinationals to stop destroying them? This speechlessness may be overcome with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy:The Epistemic Significance of Place.Christopher J. Preston - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy: The Epistemic Significance of Place.Christopher J. Preston - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.