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  1. “Keeping the Heart”: Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue.Sarah Moses - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.
    This essay considers eighteenth-century Anglican thinker Joseph Butler's view of the role of natural emotions in moral reasoning and action. Emotions such as compassion and resentment are shown to play a positive role in the moral life by motivating action and by directing agents toward certain good objects—for example, relief of misery and justice. For Butler, moral virtue is present when these natural affections are kept in proper proportion by the "superior" principles of the moral life—conscience, self-love, and benevolence—which involve (...)
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  • Relational Complexity and Ethical Responsibility.Diana Fritz Cates - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):154-165.
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  • What Kind of Person Could Be a Torturer?John P. Reeder Jr - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):67-92.
    What kind of persons could engage in political torture? Not only the morally impaired who lack empathy or compassion, or even the merely obedient, but also the righteous who struggle with conscience, and the realists who set morality aside.
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  • “Keeping the Heart”: Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue.Sarah Moses - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.
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  • Renegotiating Aquinas.Lisa Sowle Cahill - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):193-217.
    While Roman Catholic feminist ethicists typically endorse moral realism and crosscultural standards of justice, they also have been influenced by the postmodern interrogation of abstract reason and moral universalism. As theologians writing after the Second Vatican Council, they are increasingly sensitive to the communal and ecclesial dimensions of morality and of Christian ethics, and to the integral relation of Christian faith and ethics. This essay will consider two approaches to Catholic feminist ethics that differ in the relative weight they give (...)
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  • Consent, Conversion, and Moral Formation: Stoic Elements in Jonathan Edwards's Ethics.Elizabeth Agnew Cochran - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):623-650.
    The contemporary revival of virtue ethics has focused primarily on retrieving central moral commitments of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and the Neoplatonist traditions. Christian virtue ethicists would do well to expand this retrieval further to include the writings of the Roman Stoics. This essay argues that the ethics of Jonathan Edwards exemplifies major Stoic themes and explores three noteworthy points of intersection between Stoic ethics and Edwards's thought: a conception of virtue as consent to a benevolent providence, the identification of virtue (...)
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  • Flourishing on Facebook: Virtue Friendship & New Social Media.Shannon Vallor - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):185-199.
    The widespread and growing use of new social media, especially social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, invites sustained ethical reflection on emerging forms of online friendship. Social scientists and psychologists are gathering a wealth of empirical data on these trends, yet philosophical analysis of their ethical implications remains comparatively impoverished. In particular, there have been few attempts to explore how traditional ethical theories might be brought to bear upon these developments, or what insights they might offer, if any. (...)
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  • Aquinas on Hating Sin in Summa Theologiae II-II Q34 A3 and I-II Q23 A1.Keith Green - 2013 - Sophia 52 (4):601-623.
    This essay explores the phenomenological features of the passional response to evil that Aquinas calls ‘hatred of sin’ in Summa Thelogiae II-II Q34 A3 and I-II Q23 A1, among other places. Social justice concerns and philosophical objections, however, challenge the notion that one can feel hatred toward an agent’s vice or sin without it being the agent who is hated. I argue that a careful, contextual reading of these texts shows that Aquinas cannot be read as commending ‘hate’ in any (...)
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  • Social Networking Technology and the Virtues.Shannon Vallor - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):157-170.
    This paper argues in favor of more widespread and systematic applications of a virtue-based normative framework to questions about the ethical impact of information technologies, and social networking technologies in particular. The first stage of the argument identifies several distinctive features of virtue ethics that make it uniquely suited to the domain of IT ethics, while remaining complementary to other normative approaches. I also note its potential to reconcile a number of significant methodological conflicts and debates in the existing literature, (...)
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