Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Cavell’s “Moral Perfectionism” or Emerson’s “Moral Sentiment”?Joseph Urbas - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):41-53.
    What is properly Emersonian about moral perfectionism? Perhaps the best answer is: not much. Stanley Cavell's signature concept, which claims close kinship to Emerson's ethical philosophy, seems upon careful examination to be rather far removed from it. Once we get past the broad, unproblematic appeals to Emerson's “unattained but attainable self,” and consider the specific content and implications of perfectionism, the differences between the two thinkers become too substantive – and too fraught with serious misunderstandings – to be ignored. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary: The Moral Bioenhancement of Psychopaths.Elisabetta Sirgiovanni - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10:1-3.
    Baccarini and Malatesti (2017) defend the idea that we must use coercively biomedical means to enhance the morality of a specific group of individuals: psychopaths, diagnosed through the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) standards (Hare, 2003). Their argument is theoretical, thus it goes independently from the actual effectiveness of existent treatments, and it is based on a logical reasoning. Moral bioenhancement (MB) means include psychotropic drugs, brain stimulations, neurosurgeries, genetic editing, etc. -/- In short, the authors apply Gerald Gaus' account of open (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Awakening My Voice: Learning From Cavell's Perfectionist Education.Naoko Saito - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):79-89.
  • Imagining Wittgenstein's Adolescent: The Educational Significance of Expression.Jeff Frank - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):343-350.
    This paper highlights the philosophical and educational significance of expression in Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. When the role of expression is highlighted, we will be better able to appreciate Stanley Cavell's insistence that: Wittgenstein offers ways of responding to, though not a refutation of, the problem of skepticism concerning other minds, and Wittgenstein's writing style is an important aspect of his philosophy. The educational implications of this appreciation will be explored with reference to the lives of adolescences.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Intuition: The “Unseen Thread” Connecting Emerson and James*: Gregg Crane.Gregg Crane - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):57-86.
    Recent scholarly comment on the relation between Ralph Waldo Emerson and William James offers an either–or choice between conflating the two thinkers in a proto-postmodern, antifoundationalist cast or dividing them into mutually exclusive categories of idealist believer and relativist skeptic. Contending that neither of these positions captures the pragmatist adumbrations in Emerson or the transcendentalist retentions in James, this essay turns to James's annotations of Emerson's writings as a singularly revealing yet largely neglected source of information about the exact nature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fracking’: Promoter and Destroyer of ‘the Good Life.Darrick Evensen & Richard Stedman - unknown
    When discussing the effects of resource extraction in rural communities, academics commonly focus on specific and concrete impacts that fall nicely into the categories of environmental, economic, and social – for example, effects on water quality, jobs, and roads. A less common way of conceptualising effects of extractive industries, but more akin to way in which rural residents discuss and experience the complex set of effects, is changes to way of life. A growing literature explores effects on ‘wellbeing’ and ‘the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • United We Stand, Divided We Fall: The Early Nietzsche on the Struggle for Organisation.James S. Pearson - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):508-533.
    ABSTRACTAccording to Nietzsche, both modern individuals and societies are pathologically fragmented. In this paper, I examine how he proposes we combat this affliction in his Untimely Meditations. I argue that he advocates a dual struggle involving both instrumental domination and eradication. On these grounds, I claim the following: 1. pace a growing number of commentators, we cannot categorise the species of conflict he endorses in the Untimely Meditations as agonistic; and 2. this conflict is better understood as analogous to the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Nietzsche’s Cultural Elitism.David Rowthorn - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):97-115.
    Elitist readers, such as John Rawls, see Nietzsche as concerned only with the flourishing of a few great contributors to culture; egalitarian readers, such as Stanley Cavell, see Nietzschean culture as a universal affair involving every individual’s self-cultivation. This paper offers a compromise, reading Nietzsche as a ‘cultural elitist’ for whom culture demands that a few great individuals be supported in a voluntary, rather than state-mandated way. Rawls, it claims, is therefore misguided in worrying that Nietzsche’s elitism is a threat (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Problems with Autonomy.Beate Rössler - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):143-162.
    : The article first develops an account of autonomy, explaining individual autonomy by means of three normative components and then discussing two objections. The first objection claims that autonomy has to be thought of as essentially relational; this objection is refuted. The second objection, labeled the skeptical objection, claims that we simply do not live autonomously, nor could we ever. Reference is made to novels by Iris Murdoch to present a skeptical solution to this objection.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Problems with Autonomy.Beate Rössler - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):143-162.
    The article first develops an account of autonomy, explaining individual autonomy by means of three normative components and then discussing two objections. The first objection claims that autonomy has to be thought of as essentially relational; this objection is refuted. The second objection, labeled the skeptical objection, claims that we simply do not live autonomously, nor could we ever. Reference is made to novels by Iris Murdoch to present a skeptical solution to this objection.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Friedrich Schlegel and the Character of Romantic Ethics.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2010 - The Journal of Ethics 14 (1):53 - 79.
    Recent years have witnessed a rehabilitation of early German Romanticism in philosophy, including a renewed interest in Romantic ethics. Friedrich Schlegel (1772–1829) is acknowledged as a key figure in this movement. While significant work has been done on some aspects of his thought, his views on ethics have been surprisingly overlooked. This essay aims to redress this shortcoming in the literature by examining the core themes of Schlegel’s ethics during the early phase of his career (1793–1801). I argue that Schlegel’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pragmatism, Artificial Intelligence, and Posthuman Bioethics: Shusterman, Rorty, Foucault. [REVIEW]Jerold J. Abrams - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (3):241-258.
    Michel Foucault's early works criticize the development of modern democratic institutions as creating a surveillance society, which functions to control bodies by making them feel watched and monitored full time. His later works attempt to recover private space by exploring subversive techniques of the body and language. Following Foucault, pragmatists like Richard Shusterman and Richard Rorty have also developed very rich approaches to this project, extending it deeper into the literary and somatic dimensions of self-stylizing. Yet, for a debate centered (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On Morality of Speech: Cavell’s Critique of Derrida. [REVIEW]Espen Dahl - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):81-101.
    This article tries to bring out the implication of Cavell’s critical comments on Derrida, clustered around Cavell’s charge that deconstruction entails a flight from the ordinary. Cavell’s and Derrida’s different readings of Austin’s ordinary language philosophy provide a common ground for elaborating their respective positions. Their writings are at once the closest but also the most divergent when addressing the moral implication of speech, or more precisely, when addressing their understanding of responsibility and voice. Employing Derrida’s so-called ‘double reading’ as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Recent Work on Wittgenstein, 1980–1990. [REVIEW]David G. Stern - 1994 - Synthese 98 (3):415-458.
    While Wittgenstein wrote unconventionally and denied that he was advancing philosophical theses, most of his interpreters have attributed conventional philosophical theses to him. But the best recent interpretations have taken the form of his writing and his distinctive way of doing philosophy seriously. The 1980s have also seen the emergence of a body of work on Wittgenstein that makes extensive use of the unpublished Wittgenstein papers. This work on Wittgenstein's method and his way of writing are the main themes of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From “Ghost in the Machine” to “Spiritual Automaton”: Philosophical Meditation in Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Levinas. [REVIEW]Hent de Vries - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):77-97.
    This essay discusses Stanley Cavell’s remarkable interpretation of Emmanuel Levinas’s thought against the background of his own ongoing engagement with Wittgenstein, Austin, and the problem of other minds. This unlikely debate, the only extensive discussion of Levinas by Cavell in his long philosophical career sofar, focuses on their different reception of Descartes’s idea of the infinite. The essay proposes to read both thinkers against the background of Wittgenstein’s model of philosophical meditation and raises the question as to whether Cavell and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Abstraction and Finitude: Education, Chance and Democracy. [REVIEW]Richard Smith - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (1-2):19-35.
  • ‘A Glorious Sun and a Bad Person’. Wittgenstein, Ethical Reflection and the Other.Anne-Marie Søndergaard Christensen - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):207-223.
    Most commentators working on Wittgenstein’s remarks on ethics note that he rejects the very possibility of traditional normative ethics, that is, a philosophically justified normative guide for right conduct. In this article, Wittgenstein’s view of ethical reflection as presented in his notebooks from 1936 to 1938 is investigated, and the question of whether it involves ethical guidance is addressed. In Wittgenstein’s remarks, we can identify three requirements inherent in ethical reflection. The first two is revealed in the realisation that ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Refusal and Disowning Knowledge: Re-Thinking Disengagement in Higher Education.Amanda Fulford - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (1):105-115.
    This paper addresses both ‘student engagement’ in contemporary universities, and student ‘disengagement’ – where the latter is often seen as a failure of performance, or absence of will. In a bold move, the paper asks whether students should be engaged in their university education, and whether there is value in forms of disengagement. It finds an original way in which student disengagement can be understood by drawing on the writings of Stanley Cavell – on the philosophical appeal to what we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Disenchantment of Education and the Re‐Enchantment of the World.Paul Standish - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1):98-116.
  • Can Genius Be Taught? Emerson’s Genius and the Virtues of Modern Science.Emily Dumler-Winckler - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (3):272-288.
    ‘Genius, cannot be taught,’ Ralph Waldo Emerson reports, reiterating Socrates’s conclusion in Plato’s Meno. This article considers this claim and its significance for moral education, specifically in modern science, by focusing on Emerson’s account of genius and the virtue of self-trust that perfects it. Genius, for Emerson, does not refer only to extraordinary works or persons. It is also the creative action of the soul to be cultivated by all. Self-trust, in which all the virtues are realized, is its chief (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bruce Lee and the Perfection of Martial Arts : An Exercise in Alterdisciplinarity.Kyle Barrowman - 2019 - Martial Arts Studies 8:5-28.
    This essay builds from an analysis of the philosophical underpinnings of Bruce Lee’s jeet kune do to an analysis of the current state of academic scholarship generally and martial arts studies scholarship specifically. For the sake of a more comprehensive understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of jeet kune do, and in particular its affinities with a philosophical tradition traced by Stanley Cavell under the heading of perfectionism, this essay brings the philosophical writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Ayn Rand into (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Entiteettien kategorioiden onttisesta statuksesta.Markku Keinänen - 2012 - Maailma.
    This paper (in Finnish) concerns the ontological status of categories of entities. I argue that categories are not be considered as further entities. Rather, it is suffcient for entities belonging to the same category that they are in exactly the same formal ontological relations and have the same general category features.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Short Review of Varieties of Meaning, R. G. Millikan. [REVIEW]Nicholas Shea - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (1):127-130.
  • 'In Charge of the Truffula Seeds': On Children's Literature, Rationality and Children's Voices in Philosophy.Viktor Johansson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):359-377.
    In this paper I investigate how philosophy can speak for children and how children can have a voice in philosophy and speak for philosophy. I argue that we should understand children as responsible rational individuals who are involved in their own philosophical inquiries and who can be involved in our own philosophical investigations—not because of their rational abilities, but because we acknowledge them as conversational partners, acknowledge their reasons as reasons, and speak for them as well as let them speak (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Changing Politics: Thoreau, Dewey and Cavell, and Democracy as a Way of Life.Naoko Saito - 2018 - Contemporary Pragmatism 15 (2):179-193.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • "Vivir en medio del hielo". Resistencia y escepticismo en "El Anticristo”.Elena Nájera Pérez - 2018 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 51:283-303.
    El presente artículo tiene como objetivo reconstruir la ética de la resistencia que Nietzsche propone en _El Anticristo _partiendo de la imagen que se ofrece en el prólogo a modo de declaración de intenciones: “preferible _vivir en medio del hielo_”. Dicha ética le exige al individuo la superación de la psicología de la convicción o de la fe y recurre, como método, a la Filología entendida como “_ephexis _en la interpretación”. La apropiación nietzscheana de ese término procedente del pirronismo obliga (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What’s the Problem with Problem-Solving? Language, Skepticism, and Pragmatism.Naoko Saito & Paul Standish - 2009 - Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (1):153-167.
    We critically examine pragmatism's approach to skepticism and try to elucidate its certain limits. The central questions to be addressed are: whether “skepticism” interpreted through the lens of problem-solving does justice to the human condition; and whether the problem-solving approach to skepticism can do justice to pragmatism's self-proclaimed anti-foundationalism. We then examine Stanley Cavell's criticism of Dewey's “problem-solving” approach. We propose a shift from the problem-solving approach's eagerness for solutions to a more Wittgensteinian and Emersonian project of dissolution.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • High and Wide, the Exact and the Vast: Emersonian Bildung in Dialog with Humboldt and Dewey.Heikki A. Kovalainen - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (5):508-518.
    In this article, it will be my aim to outline the key features of Emerson’s original conception of Bildung, with special reference to the links, first, between the American essayist and Wilhelm von Humboldt, and second, Emerson and John Dewey. After introductory notes on how to map out Emersonian Bildung in relation to the available philosophical commentaries, I delineate some of the chief meanings of Bildung, showing how Emersonian self-culture aligns with Humboldtian Bildung. Second, I draw out concrete implications for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Measures Justice? What Justifies Happiness? Emersonian Moral Perfectionism and the Cultivation of Political Emotions.Naoko Saito - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (5):478-487.
    This article will highlight the distinctive role of Cavell in renewing a dawn of American philosophy. Following Emerson’s remark, ‘the inmost in due time becomes the outmost’, Cavell develops his distinctive line of antifoundationalist thought. To show how unique and valuable Cavell’s endeavor to resuscitate Emerson’s and Thoreau’s voice in American philosophy is, this paper discusses the political implications of Cavell’s Emersonian moral perfectionism. This involves a reconsideration of what measures justice and what justifies happiness. While Cavell is sometimes said (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Language Must Be Raked’: Experience, Race, and the Pressure of Air.Paul Standish - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):428-440.
    This article begins by clarifying the notion of what Stanley Cavell has called ‘Emersonian moral perfectionism.’ It goes on to explore this through close analysis of aspects of Emerson’s essay ‘Experience,’ in which ideas of trying or attempting or experimenting bring out the intimate relation between perfectionism and styles of writing. ‘Where do we find ourselves?’ Emerson asks, and the answer is to be found in part in what we write and what we say, injecting a new sense of possibility (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • But Everything is Against Us Here': Some Thoughts on Noddings and on Exposing Our Educational Present.Stefan Ramaekers - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):494-497.
    Noddings’s radical choice for a particular stance in life is both what makes Happiness and Education a thought-provoking book and what also leads me to have some reservations. First, I briefly outline some of these reservations and focus on what I think are two important difficulties Happiness and Education faces: firstly, the fact that Noddings’s choice for a particular conception of the good is likely to run into resistance and even incomprehension, and secondly, the observation that Noddings seems to be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In Her Own Voice: Convention, Conversion, Criteria.Paul Standish - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):91-106.
  • The Claims of Documentary: Expanding the Educational Significance of Documentary Film.Jeff Frank - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):1018-1027.
    The documentary film is a popular curriculum tool, and the goal of this paper is to expand the educational significance of the documentary genre I argue that current understandings of this genre are limited and limiting, and offer an alternative perspective on the genre. This alternative will be built from Stanley Cavell’s philosophy of education, in particular, his understanding of the role that ‘representativeness’ plays in teaching and learning.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Politics of Vulnerability and Responsibility for Ordinary Others.Sandra Laugier - 2016 - Critical Horizons 17 (2):207-223.
    The ethics of care has contributed to modifying a dominant conception of ethics and changed the way we conceive vulnerability. It has introduced ethical stakes into politics, weakening, through its critique of theories of justice, the seemingly obvious link between an ethics of justice and political liberalism. However, care corresponds to a quite ordinary reality: the fact that people look after one another, take care of one another and thus are responsible. The aim of this paper is to connect the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Education for Grown-Ups, a Religion for Adults: Scepticism and Alterity in Cavell and Levinas.Paul Standish - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):73-91.
    In his essay 'The Scandal of Skepticism', Stanley Cavell discusses aspects of the work of Emmanuel Levinas with a view to understanding how 'philosophical and religious ambitions so apparently different' as his own and those of Levinas can have led to 'phenomenological coincidences so precise'. The present paper explores themes of scepticism and alterity as these emerge in the work of these two increasingly influential philosophers. It shows education to be a sustained preoccupation in their work, crucially related to these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Race and Repression in a Dance Routine: A Response to Ramaekers and Vlieghe.Paul Standish - 2015 - Ethics and Education 10 (3):327-342.
    Stefan Ramaekers and Joris Vlieghe’s ‘Infants, childhood and language in Agamben and Cavell: education as transformation’ is an insightful discussion of an important facet of educational experience. In the article, they consider a Fred Astaire dance sequence from the 1953 Vincente Minnelli film, The Band Wagon, in combination with a remarkable article about this same sequence by Stanley Cavell. On the strength of this, they develop an interesting line of thought regarding the experience of language, exploring connections between the ideas (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Nietzsche and Japanese Buddhism on the Cultivation of the Body: To What Extent Does Truth Bear Incorporation?André van der Braak - 2009 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):223-251.
    In order to overcome the unhealthy perspective of body-mind dualism and become capable of holding the “higher” and healthier perspective of body and mind as will to power, Nietzsche stresses that one must engage in a process of cultivation of the body. Such a practice of self-cultivation involves leaving behind incorporated illusory and life-denying perspectives and incorporating more “truthful” and affirmative perspectives on life. In this article, Nietzsche’s views on the body and its cultivation will be further explored and compared (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Taking a Chance: Education for Aesthetic Judgment and the Criticism of Culture.Naoko Saito - 2015 - Ethics and Education 10 (1):96-104.
    This article explores the possibilities of the antifoundationalist thought of Cavell with a particular focus on his idea of chance in aesthetic experience, as a framework through which to destabilize the prevailing discourse of education centering on freedom and control. I try to present the idea of chance in a particular way, which does not identify it with chaos or limitlessness but takes it rather as a condition of meaning-making, and more generally of a perfecting of culture, of a conscientious (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Impudent Practices.Paul Standish - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (3):251-263.
    This article explores aspects of eros in education in relation to ideas of indirectness associated with the French concept of pudeur, sometimes translated as ‘modesty’. It explores lines of thought extending through Emerson and Nietzsche but reaching back to Plato's Symposium. This is a means of exposing the ‘impudence’ of some aspects of contemporary education and of pointing towards a conception of eros that is otherwise obscured.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Teaching in the Light of Stanley Cavell's Moral Perfectionism.Jade Tolentino - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (2):176-186.
    Drawing from Stanley Cavell's distinct understanding of skepticism, this paper first considers current and incessant obsession with notions of or related to ‘educational standards,’ ‘school effectiveness and improvement,’ ‘evidence-based education,’ ‘performance indicators’ and ‘performativity’ in various educational policies and discourses as consequences resulting from our very human desire to overcome or solve skepticism. Insidiously, this has led to the creation of a strict and distinct conception of what a good teacher should be. Ironically, this human desire to overcome skepticism, which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cosmopolitan Research and Public Thinking: Putting Oneself to the Test of Reality.Naomi Hodgson - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (3):263-275.
    This paper returns to the theme of the academic turn to cosmopolitanism as a response to the challenges of globalisation, conflict, inequality and diversity discussed here previously. The discussion of cosmopolitanism here refers to the context of current policy relating to research and what it means to be a researcher in the European Union today or, as current policy frames it, ‘the Innovation Union’. The understanding of the researcher found in current policy relates closely to the particular understanding of citizenship (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conversations: Risk, Passion and Frank Speaking in Education.Amanda Fulford - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (1):75 - 90.
    This article considers conversations in and about education. To focus the discussion, it uses the scenario of a conversation between a trainee teacher and her mentor reflecting together on a lesson that the trainee has just taught. I begin by outlining the notion of reflective practice as popularised by Donald Schön, and show how, in the scenario, the reflective practice conversation leads to talk characterised by recourse to particular dominant discourses within education, and how this in turn can lead to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Citizenship and Scholarship in Emerson, Cavell and Foucault.Naomi Hodgson - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (1):85 - 100.
    This article explores the relationship between democracy, citizenship and scholarship through the notion of voice. The conception of voice in current policy operates governmentally, and shores up an identity ordered according to existing classifications and choices rather than destabilising it, and enabling critique. Rather than leading to an empowerment then the notion of voice, found in policy, research and practice, constitutes a depoliticisation of citizenship. The work of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Stanley Cavell and Michel Foucault is drawn upon here to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Quiet Desperation, Secret Melancholy: Polemos and Passion in Citizenship Education.Naoko Saito - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (1):3 - 14.
    Contemporary scenes of democracy and education exemplify a real scepticism about the point of political participation, and by implication about one's place in society in relation to others. What is called for is a recovery of desire per se ? of people's desire to say what they want to say and their desire to participate in the creation of the public. In response, this article examines Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy. The way he reconstructs philosophy from the perspective of ordinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Cavell, Literacy and What It Means to Read.Amanda J. Fulford - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):43-55.
    This paper explores three current notions of literacy, which underpin the theorisation and practice of teaching and learning for both children and adults in England. In so doing, it raises certain problems inherent in these approaches to literacy and literacy education and shows how Stanley Cavell's notions of reading, and especially his reading of Thoreau's Walden , help to construct a notion not of literacy, but of being literate. The paper takes four themes central to Cavell's work in his The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • E-Ducating the Gaze: The Idea of a Poor Pedagogy.Jan Masschelein - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (1):43-53.
    Educating the gaze is easily understood as becoming conscious about what is 'really' happening in the world and becoming aware of the way our gaze is itself bound to a perspective and particular position. However, the paper explores a different idea. It understands educating the gaze not in the sense of 'educare' (teaching) but of 'e-ducere' as leading out, reaching out. E-ducating the gaze is not about getting at a liberated or critical view, but about liberating or displacing our view. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Multicultural Education: Embeddedness, Voice and Change.Stefan Ramaekers - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (1):55-66.
    This article is a discussion of a dominant (and mostly taken-for-granted) discourse of multicultural education (the phrase 'intercultural education' is sometimes used). My aim is, simply, to highlight two issues which, I think, are insufficiently dealt with in relation to multicultural education: the observation that differences can be irreconcilable and the idea of change. In the first part of this article, I try to sketch this discourse by giving some examples in which some characteristic markers of this discourse are illustrated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Beyond Monolingualism: Philosophy as Translation and the Understanding of Other Cultures.Naoko Saito - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (2):131-139.
    Beyond a monolingual mentality and beyond the language that is typically observed in the prevalent discourse of education for understanding other cultures, this article tries to present another approach: Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as translation . This Cavellian approach shows that understanding foreign cultures involves a relation to other cultures already within one's native culture. Foreshadowing the Cavellian sense of tragedy, Emerson's 'Devil's child' helps us detect the sources of repression and blindness that are hidden behind the foundationalist approach (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Wittgenstein as a Rebel: Dissidence and Contestation in Discursive Practices.José Medina - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (1):1 – 29.
    Through a new interpretation of Wittgenstein's rule-following discussions, this article defends a negotiating model of normativity according to which normative authority is always subject to contestation. To refute both individualism and collectivism, I supplement Wittgenstein's Private Language Argument with a Social Language Argument, showing that normativity cannot be monopolized either individually or socially (i.e. it cannot be privatized or collectivized). The negotiating view of normativity here developed lays the foundations of a politics of radical contestation which converges with Chantal Mouffe's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ventriloquising the Voice: Writing in the University.Amanda Fulford - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):223-237.
    In this paper I consider one aspect of how student writing is supported in the university. I focus on the use of the 'writing frame', questioning its status as a vehicle for facilitating student voice, and in the process questioning how that notion is itself understood. I illustrate this by using examples from the story of the 1944 Hollywood film Gaslight and show that apparent means of facilitating voice can actually contribute to a state of voicelessness. The paper considers what (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations