Switch to: References

Citations of:

In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism

University of Chicago Press (1988)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Cavell’s “Moral Perfectionism” or Emerson’s “Moral Sentiment”?Joseph Urbas - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):41-53.
    What is properly Emersonian about moral perfectionism? Perhaps the best answer is: not much. Stanley Cavell's signature concept, which claims close kinship to Emerson's ethical philosophy, seems upon careful examination to be rather far removed from it. Once we get past the broad, unproblematic appeals to Emerson's “unattained but attainable self,” and consider the specific content and implications of perfectionism, the differences between the two thinkers become too substantive – and too fraught with serious misunderstandings – to be ignored. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Chains of Dependency: On the Disenchantment and the Illusion of Being Free at Last.Paul Smeyers - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):177-191.
    Time, space, causality, communicating and acting together set limits on our freedom. Starting from the position of Wittgenstein, who advocates neither a position of pure subjectivity nor of pure objectivity, and taking into account what is implied by initiation into the symbolic order of language and culture, it is argued that the limitations on our freedom are not to be deplored. The problems of conservatism, relativism and scepticism—which confront us often in the context of education and child rearing—are inadequately dealt (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Chains of Dependency: On the Disenchantment and the Illusion of Being Free at Last.Paul Smeyers - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):461-471.
    This paper is the sequel to Part 1, which appeared in this Journal, Vol. 46 No. 2, 2012. Following Cavell and his insistence that we should not try to escape from the existential conditions we find ourselves in and look for false certainties, the relevance of embracing a particular stance is elaborated. A commitment to giving substance to an ideal of ‘the good life’ is neither an injustice towards the other nor an ignorance of her freedom. On the contrary, here (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Skepticism and Education: In Search of Another Filial Tie of Philosophy to Education.Duck‐joo Kwak - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):535-545.
    As a way of participating in the discussion on the disciplinary nature of philosophy of education, this article attempts to find another distinctive way of relating philosophy to education for the studies in philosophy of education. Recasting philosophical skepticism, which has been dismissed by Dewey and Rorty in their critiques of modern epistemology, it explores whether Cavell's romantic interpretation of it can allow us to conceive of skepticism as an exemplary practice of education, especially internal to the learner. This opens (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Friedrich Schlegel and the Character of Romantic Ethics.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2010 - The Journal of Ethics 14 (1):53 - 79.
    Recent years have witnessed a rehabilitation of early German Romanticism in philosophy, including a renewed interest in Romantic ethics. Friedrich Schlegel (1772–1829) is acknowledged as a key figure in this movement. While significant work has been done on some aspects of his thought, his views on ethics have been surprisingly overlooked. This essay aims to redress this shortcoming in the literature by examining the core themes of Schlegel’s ethics during the early phase of his career (1793–1801). I argue that Schlegel’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ordinary Experience and the Epoché: Husserl and Heidegger Versus Rosen (and Cavell).Søren Overgaard - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):307-330.
    In various publications, Stanley Cavell and Stanley Rosen have emphasized the philosophical importance of what they both call the ordinary. They both contrast their recovery of the ordinary with traditional philosophy, including the phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl. In this paper, I address Rosen’s claims in particular. I argue that Rosen turns the real situation on its head. Contra Rosen, it is not the case that the employment of Husserl’s epoché distorts the authentic voice of the ordinary—a voice that is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On Morality of Speech: Cavell’s Critique of Derrida. [REVIEW]Espen Dahl - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):81-101.
    This article tries to bring out the implication of Cavell’s critical comments on Derrida, clustered around Cavell’s charge that deconstruction entails a flight from the ordinary. Cavell’s and Derrida’s different readings of Austin’s ordinary language philosophy provide a common ground for elaborating their respective positions. Their writings are at once the closest but also the most divergent when addressing the moral implication of speech, or more precisely, when addressing their understanding of responsibility and voice. Employing Derrida’s so-called ‘double reading’ as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Review of David Granger, John Dewey, Robert Pirsig, and the Art of Living: Revisioning Aesthetic Education. [REVIEW]Craig A. Cunningham - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (4):395-401.
  • The Significance of the Poetic in Early Childhood Education: Stanley Cavell and Lucy Sprague Mitchell on Language Learning. [REVIEW]Jeff Frank - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):327-338.
    This paper begins with a discussion of Stanley Cavell’s philosophy of language learning. Young people learn more than the meaning of words when acquiring language: they learn about (the quality of) our form of life. If we—as early childhood educators—see language teaching as something like handing some inert thing to a child, then we unduly limit the possibilities of education for that child. Cavell argues that we must become poets if we are to be the type of representatives of language (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Voice as Form of Life and Life Form.Sandra Laugier - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:63-82.
    This paper studies the concept of form of life as central to ordinary language philosophy : philosophy of our language as spoken ; pronounced by a human voice within a form of life. Such an approach to Wittgenstein’s later philosophy shifts the question of the common use of language – central to Wittgenstein’s Investigations – to the definition of the subject as voice, and to the reinvention of subjectivity in language. The voice is both a subjective and common expression: it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Disenchantment of Education and the Re‐Enchantment of the World.Paul Standish - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1):98-116.
  • The Patience of Film: Cavell, Nancy and a Thought for the World.Daniele Rugo - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (4):23-35.
    Despite considerable differences, Stanley Cavell and Jean-Luc Nancy share the demand for a renewal of thinking produced through and with the concept of the world. Their articulation of the legacy bequeathed by Heidegger and Wittgenstein begins with an understanding of the world in excess of knowledge and insists on this impossible mastery as the most productive incentive for thinking. Inasmuch as philosophy has understood itself as producer of worldviews, systems and principle, philosophy has constantly suppressed the thinking of the world, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bruce Lee and the Perfection of Martial Arts : An Exercise in Alterdisciplinarity.Kyle Barrowman - 2019 - Martial Arts Studies 8:5-28.
    This essay builds from an analysis of the philosophical underpinnings of Bruce Lee’s jeet kune do to an analysis of the current state of academic scholarship generally and martial arts studies scholarship specifically. For the sake of a more comprehensive understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of jeet kune do, and in particular its affinities with a philosophical tradition traced by Stanley Cavell under the heading of perfectionism, this essay brings the philosophical writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Ayn Rand into (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘The Ordinary’ in Stanley Cavell and Jacques Derrida.Judith Wolfe - 2013 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1).
    This paper analyses the opposing accounts of ‘the ordinary’ given by Jacques Derrida and Stanley Cavell, beginning with their competing interpretations of J. L. Austin¹s thought on ordinary language. These accounts are presented as mutually critiquing: Derrida¹s deconstructive method poses an effective challenge to Cavell¹s claim that the ordinary is irreducible by further philosophical analysis, while, conversely, Cavell¹s valorisation of the human draws attention to a residual humanity in Derrida¹s text which Derrida cannot account for. The two philosophers’ approaches are, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • From Self-Reliance to That Which Relies: Emerson and Critique as Self-Criticism.Niklas Forsberg - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (5):498-507.
    How is one to navigate between a thinking grounded in the individual and a claim for communality? In Emerson, this kind of difficulty comes into view in familiar sentences such as Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense.’ How does the relationship between the personal and the universal look and function? In this paper, it is argued that Emerson may bring us clarity regarding the difficulties we are facing when it comes to questions about how we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Measures Justice? What Justifies Happiness? Emersonian Moral Perfectionism and the Cultivation of Political Emotions.Naoko Saito - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (5):478-487.
    This article will highlight the distinctive role of Cavell in renewing a dawn of American philosophy. Following Emerson’s remark, ‘the inmost in due time becomes the outmost’, Cavell develops his distinctive line of antifoundationalist thought. To show how unique and valuable Cavell’s endeavor to resuscitate Emerson’s and Thoreau’s voice in American philosophy is, this paper discusses the political implications of Cavell’s Emersonian moral perfectionism. This involves a reconsideration of what measures justice and what justifies happiness. While Cavell is sometimes said (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407-423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • James Baldwin’s ‘Everybody’s Protest Novel’: Educating Our Responses to Racism.Jeff Frank - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (1):1-8.
    The aim of this article is to establish—and explore—James Baldwin’s significance for educational theory. Through a close reading of ‘Everybody’s Protest Novel’, I show that Baldwin’s thinking is an important precursor to the work of Stanley Cavell and Cora Diamond, and is relevant to a number of problems that are educationally significant, in particular problems of race and racism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Derrida and the School: Language Loss and Language Learning in Ireland.Áine Mahon - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (2):259-271.
    With specific reference to the teaching of Irish and English in Ireland, I am concerned in this paper with the experiences of language dispossession and language pedagogy. Drawing on Jacques Derrida’s key concepts of ‘hospitality’ and ‘monolingualism’, I argue that in Ireland the first of these experiences cannot be separated from the second. Taking into consideration its colonial past as well as the changing linguistic profile of its present, Ireland is at once ‘host’ and ‘hostage’ to the English language and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Education for Grown-Ups, a Religion for Adults: Scepticism and Alterity in Cavell and Levinas.Paul Standish - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):73-91.
    In his essay 'The Scandal of Skepticism', Stanley Cavell discusses aspects of the work of Emmanuel Levinas with a view to understanding how 'philosophical and religious ambitions so apparently different' as his own and those of Levinas can have led to 'phenomenological coincidences so precise'. The present paper explores themes of scepticism and alterity as these emerge in the work of these two increasingly influential philosophers. It shows education to be a sustained preoccupation in their work, crucially related to these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Task of Ordinary Mind: Rethinking Authenticity Through the Mumonkan.Carolyn Culbertson - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):91-104.
    This essay explores the nature of authenticity through a comparison of Martin Heidegger and the classical Buddhist text, the Mumonkan (The Gateless Gate). As Stanley Cavell's interpretations of Heidegger have developed, the peculiarity of Heidegger's sense of authenticity lies in the fact that it requires us, not to negate the inauthentic everydayness into which we are fallen, but to learn to inhabit this everydayness in a new way. The task of authenticity, Cavell argues, involves a recovery and a transformation of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Taking a Chance: Education for Aesthetic Judgment and the Criticism of Culture.Naoko Saito - 2015 - Ethics and Education 10 (1):96-104.
    This article explores the possibilities of the antifoundationalist thought of Cavell with a particular focus on his idea of chance in aesthetic experience, as a framework through which to destabilize the prevailing discourse of education centering on freedom and control. I try to present the idea of chance in a particular way, which does not identify it with chaos or limitlessness but takes it rather as a condition of meaning-making, and more generally of a perfecting of culture, of a conscientious (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Teaching in the Light of Stanley Cavell's Moral Perfectionism.Jade Tolentino - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (2):176-186.
    Drawing from Stanley Cavell's distinct understanding of skepticism, this paper first considers current and incessant obsession with notions of or related to ‘educational standards,’ ‘school effectiveness and improvement,’ ‘evidence-based education,’ ‘performance indicators’ and ‘performativity’ in various educational policies and discourses as consequences resulting from our very human desire to overcome or solve skepticism. Insidiously, this has led to the creation of a strict and distinct conception of what a good teacher should be. Ironically, this human desire to overcome skepticism, which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conversations: Risk, Passion and Frank Speaking in Education.Amanda Fulford - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (1):75 - 90.
    This article considers conversations in and about education. To focus the discussion, it uses the scenario of a conversation between a trainee teacher and her mentor reflecting together on a lesson that the trainee has just taught. I begin by outlining the notion of reflective practice as popularised by Donald Schön, and show how, in the scenario, the reflective practice conversation leads to talk characterised by recourse to particular dominant discourses within education, and how this in turn can lead to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On When Words Are Called For: Cavell, McDowell, and the Wording of the World.Avner Baz - 2003 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):473 – 500.
    In Mind and World and related works, John McDowell attempts to offer us an understanding of the relation between our experience of the world and our wording of it. In arguing for this understanding, McDowell sees himself as engaged in a Wittgensteinian exorcism of a philosophical puzzlement; and his aim is to recover for us a truly satisfying way of conceiving of the relation between our words and our world. Taking my bearing from Stanley Cavell's reading of Wittgenstein, in which, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Cavell, Literacy and What It Means to Read.Amanda J. Fulford - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):43-55.
    This paper explores three current notions of literacy, which underpin the theorisation and practice of teaching and learning for both children and adults in England. In so doing, it raises certain problems inherent in these approaches to literacy and literacy education and shows how Stanley Cavell's notions of reading, and especially his reading of Thoreau's Walden , help to construct a notion not of literacy, but of being literate. The paper takes four themes central to Cavell's work in his The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Multicultural Education: Embeddedness, Voice and Change.Stefan Ramaekers - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (1):55-66.
    This article is a discussion of a dominant (and mostly taken-for-granted) discourse of multicultural education (the phrase 'intercultural education' is sometimes used). My aim is, simply, to highlight two issues which, I think, are insufficiently dealt with in relation to multicultural education: the observation that differences can be irreconcilable and the idea of change. In the first part of this article, I try to sketch this discourse by giving some examples in which some characteristic markers of this discourse are illustrated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Is Critique?Sverre Raffnsøe - unknown
    Since the Enlightenment critique has played an overarching role in how western society understands itself and its basic institutions. However, opinions differ widely concerning the understanding and evaluation of critique. To understand such differences and clarify a viable understanding of critique, the article turns to Kant’s critical philosophy, inaugurating the “age of criticism”. While generalizing and making critique unavoidable, Kant coins an unambiguously positive understanding of critique as an affirmative, immanent activity. Not only does this positive conception prevail in the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What is Critique? Critical Turns in the Age of Criticism.Sverre Raffnsøe - 2017 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 18 (1):28-60.
    Since the Enlightenment, critique has played an overarching role in how Western society understands itself and its basic institutions. However, opinions differ widely concerning the understanding and evaluation of critique. To understand such differences and clarify a viable understanding of critique, the article turns to Kant’s critical philosophy, inaugurating the “age of criticism”. While generalizing and making critique unavoidable, Kant coins an unambiguously positive understanding of critique as an affirmative, immanent activity. Not only does this positive conception prevail in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Problematising Critique in Education and Child-Rearing: Ruhloff's Scepticism.Stefan Ramaekers - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):395–407.
  • Nietzsche's Style of Address: A Response to Christopher Janaway's Beyond Selflessness.Stephen Mulhall - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):121-131.
  • Natural Doubts.Anthony Rudd - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):305–324.
    Many philosophers now argue that the doubts of the philosophical sceptic are unnatural ones, in that they are not forced on us by considerations that any reasonable person would have to accept as compelling but only arise if one has already accepted certain controversial theoretical commitments. In this article I defend the naturalness of philosophical scepticism against such criticisms. After defining "global ontological scepticism," I examine the work of a number of anti-sceptical philosophers—Michael Huemer, Michael Williams, and John McDowell. Although (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • No Harm Done: The Implications for Educational Research of the Rejection of Truth.Stefan Ramaekers - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):241–257.
  • Tom Morawetz's "Robust Enterprise": Jurisprudence After Wittgenstein.Thomas D. Eisele - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (2):140–179.
  • The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407–423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Toward a Social Psychology of Science.Serge Moscovici - 1993 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (4):343-374.
  • What Did Cavell Want of Poe?David Rudrum - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):91 – 98.
  • Postmodernism and the Education of the Whole Person.Paul Standish - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):121–135.