Switch to: References

Citations of:

Must We Mean What We Say?

(1969)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Awakening My Voice: Learning From Cavell's Perfectionist Education.Naoko Saito - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):79-89.
  • Emotions as Embodied Expressions: Wittgenstein on the Inner Life.Lucilla Guidi - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (36).
    In this paper I will examine the embodied dimension of emotions, and of inner life more generally, according to Wittgenstein’s anti-subjectivistic account of expression. First of all, I will explore Wittgenstein’s critique of a Cartesian disembodied account of the inner life, and the related argument against the existence of a private language. Secondly, I will describe the constitution of inner life as the acquisition of embodied ways of expressing oneself and of responding to others within a shared context, against the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Critical Notice. [REVIEW]Francis Sparshott - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):305-318.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Geach’s ‘Refutation’ of Austin Revisited.Avner Baz - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):pp. 41-62.
    A characteristic move of what is known as ‘ordinary language philosophy’, as exemplified by J.L. Austin's discussion of knowledge in ‘Other Minds,’ is to appeal to the ordinary and normal use of some philosophically troublesome word, with the professed aim of alleviating this or that philosophical difficulty or dispelling this or that philosophical confusion. This characteristic move has been criticized widely on the grounds that it rests on a conflation of ‘meaning’ and ‘use’; and that criticism has been quite successful (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Geach’s ‘Refutation’ of Austin Revisited.Avner Baz - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):41-62.
    A characteristic move of what is known as ‘ordinary language philosophy’, as exemplified by J.L. Austin's discussion of knowledge in ‘Other Minds,’ is to appeal to the ordinary and normal use of some philosophically troublesome word, with the professed aim of alleviating this or that philosophical difficulty or dispelling this or that philosophical confusion. This characteristic move has been criticized widely on the grounds that it rests on a conflation of ‘meaning’ and ‘use’; and that criticism has been quite successful (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Care, Narrativity, and the Nature of Disponibilité.Melvin Chen - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):778-793.
    This paper attempts to make more explicit the relationship between narrativity and feminist care ethics. The central concern is the way in which narrativity carries the semantic load that some accounts of feminist care ethics imply but leave hanging. In so doing, some feminist theorists of care-based ethics then undervalue the major contribution that narrativity provides to care ethics: it carries the semantic load that is essential to the best care. In this article, I defend the narrative as the central (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • How to Undo Things with Words: Infelicitous Practices and Infelicitous Agents.José Medina - 2007 - Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):13.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Austin that overcomes the Austin- Derrida debate by dissolving the dichotomy between construction and deconstruction and focusing on the notion of performative reconstruction. The essay also contains a discussion of the normative distinction between felicity and infelicity and how it affects the identity of speakers and agents. This discussion draws on recent Gender and Queer Theory and builds a bridge between the literature on identity and Speech Act Theory. The central argument in this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Data and Phenomena in Conceptual Modelling.Benedikt Löwe & Thomas Müller - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):131-148.
    The distinction between data and phenomena introduced by Bogen and Woodward (Philosophical Review 97(3):303–352, 1988) was meant to help accounting for scientific practice, especially in relation with scientific theory testing. Their article and the subsequent discussion is primarily viewed as internal to philosophy of science. We shall argue that the data/phenomena distinction can be used much more broadly in modelling processes in philosophy.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Structure’s Legacy: Not From Philosophy to Description.Vasso Kindi - 2013 - Topoi 32 (1):81-89.
    In the paper I consider how empirical material, from either history or sociology, features in Kuhn’s account of science in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and argue that the study of scientific practice did not offer him data to be used as evidence for defending hypotheses but rather cultivated a sensitivity for detail and difference which helped him undermine an idealized conception of science. Recent attempts in the science studies literature, appealing to Wittgenstein’s philosophy, have aimed at reducing philosophy to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Filosofisk vertigo.Richard Sørli - 2019 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 54 (4):203-219.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Några reflektioner kring Cavells och Wittgensteins relevans för samtida filosofi.Martin Gustafsson - 2019 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 54 (4):197-202.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is Antiphilosophy?Charles M. Djordjevic - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (1-2):16-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Hopelessly Strange’: Bernard Williams' Portrait of Wittgenstein as a Transcendental Idealist.Stephen Mulhall - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):386-404.
  • A Pragmatic View of Proper Name Reference.Peter Ridley - 2016 - Dissertation, King's College London
    I argue, in this thesis, that proper name reference is a wholly pragmatic phenomenon. The reference of a proper name is neither constitutive of, nor determined by, the semantic content of that name, but is determined, on an occasion of use, by pragmatic factors. The majority of views in the literature on proper name reference claim that reference is in some way determined by the semantics of the name, either because their reference simply constitutes their semantics (which generally requires a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From Performance to Passionate Utterance: Rethinking the Purpose of Restorative Conference Scripts in Schools.Naziya O’Reilly - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (2):170-183.
    In recent years restorative practice in schools has been heralded as a new paradigm for thinking about student behaviour. Its premise is to provide solutions to indiscipline, to restore relationships where there has been conflict or harm, and to give pupils a language with which to understand wrongdoing. This article offers a critique of practitioners’ use of scripts with which to facilitate the restorative conference, one of the key strategies of restorative practice. To do so I turn to J.L. Austin (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Voice as Form of Life and Life Form.Sandra Laugier - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:63-82.
    This paper studies the concept of form of life as central to ordinary language philosophy : philosophy of our language as spoken ; pronounced by a human voice within a form of life. Such an approach to Wittgenstein’s later philosophy shifts the question of the common use of language – central to Wittgenstein’s Investigations – to the definition of the subject as voice, and to the reinvention of subjectivity in language. The voice is both a subjective and common expression: it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • "Give Me an Example": Peter Winch and Learning From the Particular.Ondřej Beran - 2018 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 7 (2):49-75.
    The text deals with the role of particular examples in our understanding, especially in the encounters with unfamiliar cases that may require us to expand our concepts. I try to show that Peter Winch’s reflections on the nature of understanding can provide the foundations for such an account. Understanding consists in a response informed by a background network of particular canonical examples. It is against this background that the distinction between appropriate differentiated reactions and misplaced ones makes sense. To accommodate (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Stanley Cavell’s Argument of the Ordinary.Avner Baz - 2018 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 7 (2):9-48.
    My overall aim is to show that there is a serious and compelling argument in Stanley Cavell’s work for why any philosophical theorizing that fails to recognize what Cavell refers to as “our common world of background” as a condition for the sense of anything we say or do, and to acknowledge its own dependence on that background and the vulnerability implied by that dependence, runs the risk of rendering itself, thereby, ultimately unintelligible. I begin with a characterization of Cavell’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Book Review of Revolution of the Ordinary by Toril Moi. [REVIEW]Robert Vinten - 2017 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 6 (2):99-103.
    Book review of Moi, Toril, _Revolution of the Ordinary: Literary studies after Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell,_ Chicago : Chicago University Press, 2017. 290 pages.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Filosofia da Linguagem - uma introdução.Sofia Miguens - 2007 - Porto: Universidade do Porto. Faculdade de Letras.
    O presente manual tem como intenção constituir um guia para uma disciplina introdutória de filosofia da linguagem. Foi elaborado a partir da leccionação da disciplina de Filosofia da Linguagem I na Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto desde 2001. A disciplina de Filosofia da Linguagem I ocupa um semestre lectivo e proporciona aos estudantes o primeiro contacto sistemático com a área da filosofia da linguagem. Pretende-se que este manual ofereça aos estudantes os instrumentos necessários não apenas para acompanhar uma (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Facts and Sensibilities: What Is a Psychoanalytic Innovation?Aner Govrin - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Vision of Blindness: Blade Runner and Moral Redemption.David Macarthur - 2017 - Film-Philosophy 21 (3):371-391.
    Despite its oft-noted ambiguities, critical reception of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner ; Director's Cut ; Final Cut ) has tended to converge upon seeing it as a futuristic sci-fi film noir whose central concern is what it means to be human, a question that is fraught given the increasingly human-like replicants designed and manufactured by the Tyrell Corporation for human use on off-world colonies. Within the terms of this way of seeing things a great deal of discussion has been devoted (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Etkileşimci Metafor Kuraminin Eleştirisi.Alper Yavuz - 2019 - Kilikya Felsefe Dergisi / Cilicia Journal of Philosophy (1):1-14.
    Öz:Bu yazıda Elisabeth Camp'in metafor kuramını eleştireceğim. Bu kurama göre metaforik anlam metaforik olarak kullanılan terimin işaret ettiği şeyin karakterizasyonunun bir başka şeyin karakterizasyonu ile etkileşimi yoluyla ortaya çıkar. Bu etkileşim beraberinde metaforun önemli bilişsel özelliklerinden biri olan olarak-görme etkisini zorunlu olarak getirir. Ben bu kuramın açıklamaya çalıştığı dilsel olguyu gereksiz yere karmaşıklaştırdığını savunacağım. Söz konusu olgu etkileşime gerek olmadan da açıklanabilir. Camp'in tersine, olarak-görme etkisinin metafor için özsel olmadığını savunacağım. Bunların yanı sıra Camp'in metafor kuramının kimi değillenmiş metafor kullanımlarını (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Forms of Domination by Reason.Matteo Falomi - 2019 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 8.
    In his paper "The Problem of Domination by Reason and its Non-Relativist Solution" Oskari Kuusela describes a problem about our conception of rationality, which he labels the problem of “domination by reason”. This problem has contributed to generate, Kuusela notes, a widespread dissatisfaction with reason, which has resulted in a tendency to discard ideals of rationality altogether. Kuusela, in his paper, provides a response to this dissatisfaction. He argues that Wittgenstein, if we read him correctly, exemplifies a conception of reason (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Interpreting Intuition: Experimental Philosophy of Language.Jeffrey Maynes - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):260-278.
    The role of intuition in Kripke's arguments for the causal-historical theory of reference has been a topic of recent debate, particularly in light of empirical work on these intuitions. In this paper, I develop three interpretations of the role intuition might play in Kripke's arguments. The first aim of this exercise is to help clarify the options available to interpreters of Kripke, and the consequences for the experimental investigation of Kripkean intuitions. The second aim is to show that understanding the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Investigating Emotions Philosophically.Michael McEachrane - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (4):342-357.
    This paper is a defense of investigations into the meanings of words by reflecting on their use as a philosophical method for investigating the emotions. The paper defends such conceptual analysis against the critique that it is short of empirical grounding and at best reflects current “common-sense beliefs.” Such critique harks back to Quine’s attack on the analytic/synthetic distinction, his idea that all language is theory dependent and the subsequent critique of “linguistic philosophy” as sanctifying our ordinary use of words, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Freedom and Experience: Self-Determination Without Illusions.Magill Kevin - 1997 - London: author open access, originally MacMillan.
    Most of us take it for granted that we are free agents: that we can sometimes act so as to shape our own lives and those of others, that we have choices about how to do so and that we are responsible for what we do. But are we really justified in believing this? For centuries philosophers have argued about whether free will and moral responsibility are compatible with determinism or natural causation, and they seem no closer to agreeing about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Heidegger and the Romantics: The Literary Invention of Meaning.Pol Vandevelde - 2011 - Routledge.
    <P>While there are many books on the romantics, and many books on Heidegger, there has been no book exploring the connection between the two. Pol Vandevelde’s new study forges this important link. </P> <P>Vandevelde begins by analyzing two models that have addressed the interaction between literature and philosophy: early German romanticism (especially Schlegel and Novalis), and Heidegger’s work with poetry in the 1930s. Both models offer an alternative to the paradigm of mimesis, as exemplified by Aristotle’s and Plato’s discussion of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Wittgenstein’s Influence on Austin’s Philosophy of Language.Daniel W. Harris & Elmar Unnsteinsson - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):371-395.
    Many philosophers have assumed, without argument, that Wittgenstein influenced Austin. More often, however, this is vehemently denied, especially by those who knew Austin personally. We compile and assess the currently available evidence for Wittgenstein’s influence on Austin’s philosophy of language. Surprisingly, this has not been done before in any detail. On the basis of both textual and circumstantial evidence we show that Austin’s work demonstrates substantial engagement with Wittgenstein’s later philosophy. In particular, Austin’s 1940 paper, ‘The Meaning of a Word’, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Being Struck by Value –.Kevin Mulligan - unknown
    Suppose that realism about values is true, that there are objects and states of affairs which are intrinsically valuable, that some objects and states of affairs are intrinsically more valuable than others and that some objects and states of affairs are intrinsically valuable for Sam, and others for Maria.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • American Philosophy in the Twentieth Century.James R. O'Shea - 2008 - In Dermot Moran (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 204.
    This selective overview of the history of American Philosophy in the Twentieth Century begins with certain enduring themes that were developed by the two main founders of classical American pragmatism, Charles Sanders Peirce (1839--1914) and William James. Against the background of the pervasive influence of Kantian and Hegelian idealism in America in the decades surrounding the turn of the century, pragmatism and related philosophical outlooks emphasizing naturalism and realism were dominant during the first three decades of the century. Beginning in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Meaning and Ontology.Ernest Lepore - manuscript
    Plato did it. Aristotle did it. All the great philosophers did it. You do it and we do it: we draw philosophical conclusions from linguistic data. Although we all do it, the degree, manner, and intensity to which it is done varies. Some have made piecemeal observations about language (e.g., “all these different things have the same term predicated of them”) to draw metaphysical conclusions (e.g., “there is some one existing thing that all these different entities share”). Others have made (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Review of C. Koopman, Pragmatism as Transition. Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty. [REVIEW]Roberto Frega - 2009 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 1 (1).
  • Linguistics and Philosophy.Ernest Lepore & Francis Jeffry Pelletier - unknown
    Roger Gibson has achieved as much as anyone else, indeed, more, in presenting and defending Quine’s philosophy. It is no surprise that the great man W.V. Quine himself said that in reading Gibson he gained a welcome perspective on his own work. His twin books The Philosophy of W.V. Quine and Enlightened Empiricism have no rivals. We are all indebted to Roger. The essay that follows is intended not only to honor him but also to continue a theme that runs (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rational Argument in Moral Philosophy: Some Implications of Gordon Baker's Therapeutic Conception of Philosophy.Christopher Lawton - unknown
    This work is an investigation into philosophical method and rational argument in moral philosophy. It makes an original contribution to human understanding, by taking some of the tools and techniques that Gordon Baker identifies in the later work of Wittgenstein, and using them as a way of fending for oneself in an area of philosophy that neither Baker, nor Wittgenstein, wrote on. More specifically, a discussion of some different aspects of the contemporary literature on Dancy’s moral particularism is used as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mood, Delusions and Poetry: Emotional ‘Wording of the World’ in Psychosis, Philosophy and the Everyday.Owen Earnshaw - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1697-1708.
    Starting from a comparison of the similarities between a poem by Sylvia Plath called Tulips and the words of someone in the thrall of a delusion I develop a phenomenology of how mood is basic to our articulation of the world. To develop this argument I draw on Heidegger’s concept of attunement [befindlichkeit] and his contention that basic emotions open up aspects of the world for closer inspection and articulation. My thesis in this paper is that there is an underlying (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • 'In Charge of the Truffula Seeds': On Children's Literature, Rationality and Children's Voices in Philosophy.Viktor Johansson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):359-377.
    In this paper I investigate how philosophy can speak for children and how children can have a voice in philosophy and speak for philosophy. I argue that we should understand children as responsible rational individuals who are involved in their own philosophical inquiries and who can be involved in our own philosophical investigations—not because of their rational abilities, but because we acknowledge them as conversational partners, acknowledge their reasons as reasons, and speak for them as well as let them speak (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Moral Objectivity.Jonathan Lear - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 17:135-170.
    The aim of this essay is to set out an argument for moral objectivity. A brief sketch of the considerations at issue should help make it possible to keep sight of the forest amid the profusion of trees.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Does Knowledge Rest Upon a Form of Life?Andrea Kern - 2015 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5 (1):13-28.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 13 - 28 Linking the idea of knowledge with the idea of a certain form of life is uncontestedly one of the lessons the later Wittgenstein wanted to teach us. However, what Wittgenstein exactly meant by this is highly contested in the Wittgenstein literature. In this paper, I distinguish two ways of appealing to the idea of a form of life in order to understand knowledge. According to the first way, the appeal to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Introduction.Jean-Philippe Narboux - 2014 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 4 (3-4):153-188.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Languages of Man.Jose Arcaya - 1973 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 4 (1):315-329.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Sound of Bedrock: Lines of Grammar Between Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell.Avner Baz - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):607-628.
    In ‘Aesthetics Problems of Modern Philosophy’ Stanley Cavell proposes, first, that Kant's characterization of judgments of beauty may be read as a Wittgensteinian grammatical characterization, and, second, that the philosophical appeal to ‘what we say and mean’ partakes of the grammar of judgment of beauty. I argue first that the expression of the dawning of an aspect partakes of the grammar of judgments of beauty as characterized by Kant, and may also be seen—on a prevailing way of thinking about concepts (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Unboundedness of the Plain; or the Ubiquity of Lilliput? How to Do Things with Thompson Clarke?Kelly Dean Jolley & Keren Gorodeisky - 2014 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 4 (3-4):225-262.
    In this essay, we focus primarily on Moore’s “Proof of an External World” and Kant’s “Refutation of Idealism.” We are not exactly commenting on Clarke’s “The Legacy of Skepticism,” interpreting it, although what we do involves us in (some of) that. Instead of directly commenting on it, we do things with Legacy; we read Moore’s Proof and Kant’s Refutation with Clarke in mind. And by way of doing this, we bring onto the stage a post-Legacy Moore, and a post-Legacy Kant. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ordinary Language, Conventionalism and a Priori Knowledge.Henry Jackman - 2001 - Dialectica 55 (4):315-325.
    This paper examines popular‘conventionalist’explanations of why philosophers need not back up their claims about how‘we’use our words with empirical studies of actual usage. It argues that such explanations are incompatible with a number of currently popular and plausible assumptions about language's ‘social’character. Alternate explanations of the philosopher's purported entitlement to make a priori claims about‘our’usage are then suggested. While these alternate explanations would, unlike the conventionalist ones, be compatible with the more social picture of language, they are each shown to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • In Her Own Voice: Convention, Conversion, Criteria.Paul Standish - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):91-106.
  • Reconsideration of Rorty's View of the Liberal Ironist and its Implications for Postmodern Civic Education.Duck‐Joo Kwak - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (4):347–359.
  • James Baldwin’s ‘Everybody’s Protest Novel’: Educating Our Responses to Racism.Jeff Frank - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (1):1-8.
    The aim of this article is to establish—and explore—James Baldwin’s significance for educational theory. Through a close reading of ‘Everybody’s Protest Novel’, I show that Baldwin’s thinking is an important precursor to the work of Stanley Cavell and Cora Diamond, and is relevant to a number of problems that are educationally significant, in particular problems of race and racism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Love and the Need for Comprehension.Eileen John - 2013 - Philosophical Explorations 16 (3):285-297.
    The question of how well we need to be known, to be loved, is considered. A ‘second-person’ model is argued for, on which love requires that the beloved’s demands to be known be respected. This puts pressure on the idea that lovers need to make a beloved’s interests their own, taking that to require comprehension of the beloved’s interests: a lover would have to appreciate the normative intelligibility and motivating force of an interest. The possibility of love with failure of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Education for Grown-Ups, a Religion for Adults: Scepticism and Alterity in Cavell and Levinas.Paul Standish - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):73-91.
    In his essay 'The Scandal of Skepticism', Stanley Cavell discusses aspects of the work of Emmanuel Levinas with a view to understanding how 'philosophical and religious ambitions so apparently different' as his own and those of Levinas can have led to 'phenomenological coincidences so precise'. The present paper explores themes of scepticism and alterity as these emerge in the work of these two increasingly influential philosophers. It shows education to be a sustained preoccupation in their work, crucially related to these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Priority of Receptivity to Creativity (Or: I Trusted You with the Idea of Me and You Lost It).Nikolas Kompridis - 2012 - Critical Horizons 13 (3):337 - 350.
    In this paper I address what Arendt called the “problem of the new”, or, as Castoriadis put it, the problem of how to make the new “the object of our praxis”. I argue that the problem of the new requires thinking about receptivity in a new way, making it normatively and epistemically prior to creativity. I illuminate my new approach to receptivity through detailed engagement with Russell Hoban’s brilliant novel, The Medusa Frequency.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations