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  1. Imagining Wittgenstein's Adolescent: The Educational Significance of Expression.Jeff Frank - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):343-350.
    This paper highlights the philosophical and educational significance of expression in Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. When the role of expression is highlighted, we will be better able to appreciate Stanley Cavell's insistence that: Wittgenstein offers ways of responding to, though not a refutation of, the problem of skepticism concerning other minds, and Wittgenstein's writing style is an important aspect of his philosophy. The educational implications of this appreciation will be explored with reference to the lives of adolescences.
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  • Must We Mean What We Do? – Review Symposium on Leys’s The Ascent of Affect.Clive Barnett - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (2):115-126.
  • Cavell’s “Moral Perfectionism” or Emerson’s “Moral Sentiment”?Joseph Urbas - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):41-53.
    What is properly Emersonian about moral perfectionism? Perhaps the best answer is: not much. Stanley Cavell's signature concept, which claims close kinship to Emerson's ethical philosophy, seems upon careful examination to be rather far removed from it. Once we get past the broad, unproblematic appeals to Emerson's “unattained but attainable self,” and consider the specific content and implications of perfectionism, the differences between the two thinkers become too substantive – and too fraught with serious misunderstandings – to be ignored. It (...)
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  • On Morality of Speech: Cavell’s Critique of Derrida. [REVIEW]Espen Dahl - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):81-101.
    This article tries to bring out the implication of Cavell’s critical comments on Derrida, clustered around Cavell’s charge that deconstruction entails a flight from the ordinary. Cavell’s and Derrida’s different readings of Austin’s ordinary language philosophy provide a common ground for elaborating their respective positions. Their writings are at once the closest but also the most divergent when addressing the moral implication of speech, or more precisely, when addressing their understanding of responsibility and voice. Employing Derrida’s so-called ‘double reading’ as (...)
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  • The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407-423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
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  • Education for Grown-Ups, a Religion for Adults: Scepticism and Alterity in Cavell and Levinas.Paul Standish - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):73-91.
    In his essay 'The Scandal of Skepticism', Stanley Cavell discusses aspects of the work of Emmanuel Levinas with a view to understanding how 'philosophical and religious ambitions so apparently different' as his own and those of Levinas can have led to 'phenomenological coincidences so precise'. The present paper explores themes of scepticism and alterity as these emerge in the work of these two increasingly influential philosophers. It shows education to be a sustained preoccupation in their work, crucially related to these (...)
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  • What Did Cavell Want of Poe?David Rudrum - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):91 – 98.
  • In Her Own Voice: Convention, Conversion, Criteria.Paul Standish - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):91-106.
  • “But What About This?”.Andrew Lugg - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:221-240.
    Philosophical Investigations §§19–20 have received little critical attention and their importance has mostly gone unappreciated. In this paper these sections are examined a few sentences at a time in the order they were written with an eye to determining what Wittgenstein does and does not say and how he has been and can be misinterpreted. In addition it is suggested that the material deserves careful consideration because it sheds light on Wittgenstein’s way of tackling philosophical problems, illuminates his pronouncements about (...)
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  • ‘Blind’ to the Obvious.Janette Dinishak - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (4):59-76.
    The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein cites the Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Koehler almost as often as he cites William James in his posthumously published writings on the philosophy of psychology. Yet, few treatments of the Wittgenstein–Koehler relation in the philosophical literature could be called sustained discussions. Moreover, most of them treat Koehler as a mere whipping boy for Wittgenstein, one more opportunity to criticize the practice of psychologists. This article emphasizes how much the two thinkers agreed, and the extent to which some (...)
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  • The Poetics of Meaningful Work: An Analogy to Speech Acts.Todd Mei - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (1):1-21.
    Meaningful work refers to the idea that human work is an integral part of the way we think of our lives as going well. The concept is prevalent in sociology and business studies. In philosophy, its discussion tends to revolve around matters of justice and whether the State should take steps to eradicate meaningless work. However, despite the breadth of the recent, general literature, there is little to no discussion about how it is in fact the case that work is (...)
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  • Wittgenstein’s Later Work’s Influence on the Methods of Language Research.Aleksandra Derra - 2010 - Studia Semiotyczne—English Supplement 27:301-324.
    The presentation of the basic principles of Wittgenstein’s methodology of language research has two objectives. First, his discussion of language and meaning only becomes intelligible in a broader perspective of the assumptions adopted concerning research methodology. Second, the assumption of some propositions in contemporary theories on the categories of use or the notion of rule that involves accepting or rejecting some more general claims on language. On account of the vastness of the material, ambiguity in Wittgenstein’s thought but also the (...)
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  • ‘The Ordinary’ in Stanley Cavell and Jacques Derrida.Judith Wolfe - 2013 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1).
    This paper analyses the opposing accounts of ‘the ordinary’ given by Jacques Derrida and Stanley Cavell, beginning with their competing interpretations of J. L. Austin¹s thought on ordinary language. These accounts are presented as mutually critiquing: Derrida¹s deconstructive method poses an effective challenge to Cavell¹s claim that the ordinary is irreducible by further philosophical analysis, while, conversely, Cavell¹s valorisation of the human draws attention to a residual humanity in Derrida¹s text which Derrida cannot account for. The two philosophers’ approaches are, (...)
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  • Ventriloquising the Voice: Writing in the University.Amanda Fulford - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):223-237.
    In this paper I consider one aspect of how student writing is supported in the university. I focus on the use of the 'writing frame', questioning its status as a vehicle for facilitating student voice, and in the process questioning how that notion is itself understood. I illustrate this by using examples from the story of the 1944 Hollywood film Gaslight and show that apparent means of facilitating voice can actually contribute to a state of voicelessness. The paper considers what (...)
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  • Geophilosophy, Education and the Pedagogy of the Concept.Michael A. Peters - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (3):217–226.
  • Out of the Ordinary: Incorporating Limits with Austin and Derrida.Emma Williams - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (12):1-16.
    This article seeks to open up a re-examination of the relationship between thought and language by reference to two philosophers: John Austin and Jacques Derrida. While in traditional philosophical terms these thinkers stand far apart, recent work in the philosophy of education has highlighted the importance of Austin’s work in a way that has begun to bridge the philosophical divide. This article seeks to continue the renewed interest in Austin in educational research, yet also take it in new direction by (...)
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  • In Her Own Voice: Convention, Conversion, Criteria.Paul Standish - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):91–106.
  • Wittgenstein and Post‐Analytic Philosophy of Education: Rorty or Lyotard?Michael Peters - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (2):1–32.
    (1997). Wittgenstein and post‐analytic philosophy of education: Rorty or Lyotard? Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 1-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00018.x.
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  • The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407–423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
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