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  1. International Business, Human Rights, and Moral Complicity: A Call for a Declaration on the Universal Rights and Duties of Business.W. Michael Hoffman & Robert E. Mcnulty - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (4):541-570.
  • Global Rules and Private Actors: Toward a New Role of the Transnational Corporation in Global Governance.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):505-532.
    : We discuss the role that transnational corporations should play in developing global governance, creating a framework of rules and regulations for the global economy. The central issue is whether TNCs should provide global rules and guarantee individual citizenship rights, or instead focus on maximizing profits. First, we describe the problems arising from the globalization process that affect the relationship between public rules and private firms. Next we consider the position of economic and management theories in relation to the social (...)
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  • Where Is the Accountability in International Accountability Standards?: A Decoupling Perspective.Tammy L. MacLean - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):45-72.
    A common complaint by academics and practitioners is that the application of international accountability standards (IAS) does not lead to significant improvements in an organization’s social responsibility. When organizations espouse their commitment to IAS but do not put forth the effort necessary to operationally enact that commitment, a “credibility cover” is created that perpetuates business as usual. In other words, the legitimacy that organizations gain by formally adopting the standards may shield the organization from closer scrutiny, thus enabling rather than (...)
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  • Where Is the Accountability in International Accountability Standards?: A Decoupling Perspective.Michael Behnam & Tammy L. MacLean - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):45-72.
    A common complaint by academics and practitioners is that the application of international accountability standards does not lead to significant improvements in an organization’s social responsibility. When organizations espouse their commitment to IAS but do not put forth the effort necessary to operationally enact that commitment, a “credibility cover” is created that perpetuates business as usual. In other words, the legitimacy that organizations gain by formally adopting the standards may shield the organization from closer scrutiny, thus enabling rather than constraining (...)
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  • The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto: Implementing a Moral Values Foundation in the Multinational Enterprise. [REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill & Waheeda Lillevik - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):213 - 230.
    The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto (" Manifesto") is a moral framework/code of conduct which is both interactive and interdependent with the economic function of the main institutions of the economic system: markets, governments, civil society, and supranational organizations, which lays out a common fundamental vision of what is legitimate, just, and fair in economic activities. The Manifesto includes five universally accepted principles and values: the principle of humanity; the basic values of non-violence and respect for life; the basic values of (...)
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  • Barriers Against Globalizing Corporate Ethics: An Analysis of Legal Disputes on Implementing U.S. Codes of Ethics in Germany.Till Talaulicar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):349-360.
    Global firms need to decide on the correspondence between their corporate ethics and the globalization of their activities. When firms go global, they face ethical complexities as they operate in different legal and cultural environments that may impact the admissibility and appropriateness of their approach to institutionalize and implement corporate ethics. Global firms may have good reasons to establish global codes of ethics that are to be obeyed by all employees worldwide. However, developing and implementing such codes can be rather (...)
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  • Opportunities and Problems of Standardized Ethics Initiatives – a Stakeholder Theory Perspective.Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Andreas Rasche - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):755-773.
    This article explains problems and opportunities created by standardized ethics initiatives (e.g., the UN Global Compact, the Global Reporting Initiative, and SA 8000) from the perspective of stakeholder theory. First, we outline differences and commonalities among currently existing initiatives and thus generate a common ground for our discussion. Second, based on these remarks, we critically evaluate standardized ethics initiatives by drawing on descriptive, instrumental, and normative stakeholder theory. In doing so, we explain why these standards are helpful tools when it (...)
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  • Doing Business with Rights Violating Regimes Corporate Social Responsibility and Myanmar’s Military Junta.Ian Holliday - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):329-342.
    Whether to do business with rights violating regimes is one of many dilemmas faced by socially responsible corporations. In this article the difficult case of Myanmar is considered. Ruled for decades by a closed and sometimes brutal military elite, the country has long been subject to informal and formal sanctions. However, as sanctions have failed to trigger political reform, it is necessary to review the policy options. The focus here is on the contribution socially responsible corporations might make to change. (...)
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