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A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy

Princeton: Princeton University Press (1963)

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  1. Special Topic: Filial Piety: The Root of Morality or the Source of Corruption? Confucianism and Corruption: An Analysis of Shun’s Two Actions Described by Mencius.Liu Qingping - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (1):1-19.
    Confucianism advocates the lofty moral ideal of humane love (ren ai 仁愛) and condemns immoral actions. Strangely enough, however, Mencius, a paradigmatic Confucian intellectual who believed that a true man cannot be corrupted by wealth, subdued by power, or affected by poverty (Tu 1989a: 15), highly commended such typically corrupt actions as bending the law for the benefit of relatives or appointing people by mere nepotism when he talked about Shun 舜 in the text of the Mencius. In the first (...)
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  • The Mencian Theory of Human Xing Reconsidered1.Zhaolu Lu - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):147-163.
  • A Cognitive Analysis of Confucian Self-Knowledge: According to Tu Weiming’s Explanation.Chi Chienchih - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):267-282.
  • Lao-Zhuang and Augustine on the Issue of Suspension in the Philosophy of Religion.Changchi Hao - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):75-99.
    This paper addresses the question why the issue of reason and evidence as the central concern in the mainstream contemporary philosophy of religion has to be displaced by the issue of suspension according to Lao-Zhuang and the Augustine of Hippo. For both Lao-Zhuang and Augustine, in making room for the Other to appear at the core of the self’s being, it shows that there is an inseparable relationship of the self to the Other. In suspending its own understanding, admitting its (...)
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  • Ethics of Care and Concept ofJen: A Reply to Chenyang Li.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-129.
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  • Ethics of Care and Concept Of.Lijun Yuan - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):107-129.
    : This comparative study of the ethics of care and the Confucian concept of jen argue against two assumptions made by Chenyang Li in his own study of these two traditions. Against him, I argue that a "feminine" morality is not adequate to address human equality, and that care-orientated theories like jen and care seem incompatible with the feminist commitment to oppose the subjection of women.
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  • Zhuangzi’s Cheng Xin and its Implications for Virtue and Perspectives.Chong Kim-Chong - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):427-443.
    The concept of the cheng xin in the Zhuangzi claims that the cognitive function of the heart-mind is not over and above its affective states and in charge of them in developing and controlling virtue, as assumed by the Confucians and others. This joint cognitive and affective nature of the heart-mind denies ethical and epistemic certainty. Individual perspectives are limited given habits of thought, attitudes, personal orientations and particular cognitive/affective experiences. Nevertheless, the heart-mind has a vast imaginative capacity that allows (...)
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  • Dwelling in the Nearness of Gods: The Hermeneutical Turn From Mou Zongsan to Tu Weiming.Chen-kuo Lin - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):381-392.
    This article argues that, as far as the problem of Confucian religiosity is concerned, there is an interpretative turn from Mou Zongsan’s moral metaphysics to Tu Weiming’s religious hermeneutics. Some concluding remarks are made: First, Tu’s hermeneutics is rooted in the ontology of self as interrelatedness, which is completely different from Mou’s theory of true self as transcendental subjectivity. Second, Tu’s hermeneutics of self can be better illuminated with the help of Heidegger’s notion of Dasein as Being-with (Mitsein). For Tu (...)
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  • Heng and Temporality of Dao: Laozi and Heidegger. [REVIEW]Qingjie Wang - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):55-71.
  • Two Notions of Freedom in Classical Chinese Thought: The Concept of Hua 化 in the Zhuangzi and the Xunzi.Jiang Tao - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):463-486.
    This essay is an attempt to sketch out two contrasting notions of freedom in the Zhuangzi and the Xunzi . I argue that to understand the classical Chinese formulations of freedom we should look at the concept of hua 化 (transformation or to transform). It is a kind of freedom that highlights the moral and/or spiritual transformation of the self and its entailments on the connection between the self and various domains of relationality. The Zhuangzian hua is the transformation of (...)
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  • The Source of the Idea of Equality in Confucian Thought.Ruiquan Gao - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):486-505.
    Although the traditional society in China was not necessarily a society of equality, and the classical Confucianism did not speak much about the principle of universal equality, in modern times, in the midst of a transformation of value systems, people still find correlating sources within the Confucian tradition that is connected to the modern idea of equality. This essay makes a detailed study on this correlation and points out that ancient Chinese society and the western feudal society are different in (...)
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  • The Mandate of Empathy.Michael Slote - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):303-307.
    Confucian thinkers seem to have had something like our present concept of empathy long before that notion was self-consciously available in the West. Wang Yang-Ming’s talk of forming one body with others and similar ideas in the writings of Cheng Hao and, much earlier, of Mengzi make it clear that the Confucian traditions not only had the idea of empathy but saw its essential relation to phenomena like compassion, benevolence, and sympathy that are constitutive of the altruistic side of morality. (...)
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  • The Viability of Confucian Transcendence: Grappling with Tu Weiming’s Interpretation of the Zhongyong.Sze-kar Wan - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):407-421.
    Weiming’s notion of transcendence in terms both of its legitimacy as an interpretation of Confucianism and of its viability as an answer to modern challenges. An examination of Tu’s hermeneutical assumptions in his Zhongyong commentary leads to a discussion of his locating transcendence in the subjectivity of the junzi, the profound person. Calling the self-cultivation self-knowledge, Tu makes explicit the religious character of the xin, the basis of self-cultivation, and its transcendent character, because it is endowed from heaven. However, because (...)
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  • Virtue Ethics and Being Morally Moved.Qingjie Wang - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):309-321.
    This essay shall discuss the moral feeling of being morally moved (daode gandong 道德感动) and explore its philosophical significances in understanding the nature of virtue ethics, especially that of Confucian ethics as exemplary ethics. I would like to argue that the feeling of being morally moved, similar to other feelings such as resentment or indignation, should be seen as one of the most important testimonies or manifestations of our morality or moral consciousness. It has played a very important role of (...)
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  • From Substance Language to Vocabularies of Process and Change: Translations of Key Philosophical Terms in the Zhongyong.Haiming Wen - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):217-233.
  • On Mirrors of Virtue.Lisa Raphals - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):349-357.
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  • Zhongyong as Grand Harmony: An Alternative Reading to Ames and Hall’s Focusing the Familiar.Chenyang Li - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):173-188.
  • The Practicality of Ancient Virtue Ethics: Greece and China.Jiyuan Yu - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):289-302.
    Virtue ethics has been charged with being unable to provide solutions to practical moral issues. In response, the defenders of virtue ethics argue that normative virtue ethics exists. The debate is significant on its own, yet both sides of the controversy approach the issue from the assumption that moral philosophy has to tell us what we should do. In this essay, I would like to examine the question regarding the practicality of virtue ethics in a different way. Virtue ethics is (...)
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  • Dao, Harmony and Personhood: Towards a Confucian Ethics of Technology.Pak-Hang Wong - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):67-86.
    A closer look at the theories and questions in philosophy of technology and ethics of technology shows the absence and marginality of non-Western philosophical traditions in the discussions. Although, increasingly, some philosophers have sought to introduce non-Western philosophical traditions into the debates, there are few systematic attempts to construct and articulate general accounts of ethics and technology based on other philosophical traditions. This situation is understandable, for the questions of modern sciences and technologies appear to be originated from the West; (...)
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  • The Virtuous Body at Work: The Ethical Life as Qi 氣 in Motion.Robin Wang - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):339-351.
    This essay argues that moral self-cultivation as described in the Confucian tradition involves the cultivation of the body. Preparing the body in certain ways, perhaps by making it healthy, is a necessary part of moral self-cultivation. This claim includes: (a) nourishing the body in a proper way is a first step in moral self-cultivation, and the bodily care is instrumentally valuable to one’s flourishing life; (b) making and keeping a healthy body is partly constitutive of a moral well-being and hence (...)
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  • Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide From Confucian Moral Perspectives.Lo Ping-Cheung - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):53-77.
    This essay first discusses the three major arguments in favor of euthanasia and physician-assisted-suicide in contemporary Western society, viz ., the arguments of mercy, preventing indignity, and individual autonomy. It then articulates both Confucian consonance and dissonance to them. The first two arguments make use of Confucian discussions on suicide whereas the last argument appeals to Confucian social-political thought. It concludes that from the Confucian moral perspectives, none of the three arguments is fully convincing.
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  • Realism (Fajia), Human Akrasia, and the Milieu for Ultimate Virtue.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (1):21-44.
  • Response to Yang Xiaomei.Warren G. Frisina - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):327-331.
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  • Filial Piety, Vital Power, and a Moral Sense of Immortality in Zhang Zai’s Philosophy.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):223-239.
    The present article focuses on Zhang Zai’s 張載 attitude toward death and its moral significance. It launches with the unusual link between the opening statement of the Western Inscription 西銘 regarding heaven and earth as parents and the conclusion that serving one’s cosmic parents during life, one is peaceful in death. Through the analogy of human relations with heaven and earth as filial piety (xiao 孝), Zhang Zai sets a framework for an understanding that being filial through life eliminates the (...)
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  • Zhu Xi’s Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (1133–1180) and the other “gentlemen of Hunan” from about 1167 to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to (...)
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  • The Confucian Self and Experiential Spirituality.Xinzhong Yao - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):393-406.
    Since the publication of his book on Zhongyong, Tu Weiming has worked for more than 30 years on an anthropocosmic reconstruction of the Confucian universe, in which self-transformation is defined both as the starting point and as the necessary vehicle for one’s spiritual journey. This article is primarily intended to examine Tu’s attempts to reconstruct Confucian spirituality but further to take a step forward to argue that in the spiritual world as construed by Confucius and Mencius, the experiential functions as (...)
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  • The Expansion of Epistemology: The Metaphysical Vs. The Practical Approach.Zhenhua Yu - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):83-100.
    From the perspective of world philosophy, one phenomenon of the 20th century is quite intriguing. Certain philosophers in China as well as in the West, finding the traditional conception of epistemology too narrow-minded, argued that its scope should be expanded. The Chinese way of expanding epistemology might be called the metaphysical approach, and the Western way the practical approach. In this article, I will first give an outline of both approaches and then try to demonstrate that a substantial dialogue can (...)
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  • Emptiness, Being and Non-Being: Sengzhao’s Reinterpretation of the Laozi and Zhuangzi in a Buddhist Context.Tan Mingran - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):195-209.
  • Endurance and Non-Endurance: From the Perspective of Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW]Shaoming Chen - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):335-351.
    By analysing the two relevant psychological phenomena of “endurance” and “non-endurance,” this essay aims to reveal the ethical implications of a Confucian approach, namely regarding non-endurance as an impulse of primary virtue. Based on this case study, the author then explores the significance of moral cultivation or psychological training in establishing moral personality and the complexities of such a process. Meanwhile, “love” in Confucian ethics means sympathy for the inferior rather than affection for the revered. Hopefully, this study may deepen (...)
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  • Appropriating the Other and Transforming Consciousness Into Wisdom: Some Philosophical Reflections on Chinese Buddhism. [REVIEW]Vincent Shen - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):43-62.
  • Metaphysics and Morality in Neo-Confucianism and Greece: Zhu XI, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus.Kenneth Dorter - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):255-276.
    If Z hu Xi had been a western philosopher, we would say he synthesized the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus: that he took from Plato the theory of forms, from Aristotle the connection between form and empirical investigation, and from Plotinus self-differentiating holism. But because a synthesis abstracts from the incompatible elements of its members, it involves rejection as well as inclusion. Thus, Z hu Xi does not accept the dualism by which Plato opposed to the rational forms an (...)
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  • Embracing Differences and Many: The Signification of One in Zhuangzi’s Utterance of Dao.Geling Shang - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):229-250.
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  • Sagely Ease and Moral Perception.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):31-55.
  • Introducing Survival Ethics Into Engineering Education and Practice.C. Verharen, J. Tharakan, G. Middendorf, M. Castro-Sitiriche & G. Kadoda - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):599-623.
    Given the possibilities of synthetic biology, weapons of mass destruction and global climate change, humans may achieve the capacity globally to alter life. This crisis calls for an ethics that furnishes effective motives to take global action necessary for survival. We propose a research program for understanding why ethical principles change across time and culture. We also propose provisional motives and methods for reaching global consensus on engineering field ethics. Current interdisciplinary research in ethics, psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary theory grounds (...)
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  • Xin and Moral Failure: Reflections on Mencius' Moral Psychologyand Moral Failure: Reflections on Mencius' Moral Psychology.A. S. Cua - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):31-53.
  • A Critique of Steven Katz’s “Contextualism”: An Asian Perspective.Shigenori Nagatomo - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):185-207.
  • Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
  • Nature, Interthing Intersubjectivity, and the Environment: A Comparative Analysis of Kant and Daoism.Ann A. Pang-White - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):61-78.
    The Kantian philosophy, for many, largely represents the Modern West’s anthropocentric dominance of nature in its instrumental-rationalist orientation. Recently, some scholars have argued that Kant’s aesthetics offers significant resources for environmental ethics, while others believe that Kant’s flawed dualistic views in the second Critique severely undermine any environmental promise that aesthetic judgments may hold in Kant’s third Critique . This article first examines the meanings of nature in Kant’s three Critique s. It concludes that Kant’s aesthetic view toward sensible nature (...)
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  • What’s Ignored in Itō Jinsai’s Interpretation of Mencius?Chun-Chieh Huang - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):1-10.
    This article discusses the 17 th century Japanese Confucian I tō Jinsai’s interpretation of Mencius. It is argued that I tō Jinsai grinds the Mencius with an axe of Japanese “practical learning.” In his representation of Mencius, the government of “Kindly Way” is upheld as the core value in Mencius’ thought. Although there is a clear spirituality in his own philosophy, he stressed the political aspect of Mencius’ thought at the expense of the transcendental aspect of his theory of human (...)
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  • Selfhood and Fiduciary Community: A Smithian Reading of Tu Weiming’s Confucian Humanism. [REVIEW]Yen-zen Tsai - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):349-365.
    Weiming, as a leading spokesman for contemporary New Confucianism, has been reinterpreting the Confucian tradition in the face of the challenges of modernity. Tu takes selfhood as his starting point, emphasizing the importance of cultivating the human mind-and-heart as a deepening and broadening process to realize the anthropocosmic dao. He highlights the concept of a fiduciary community and advocates that, because of it, Confucianism remains a dynamic inclusive humanism. Tu’s mode of thinking tallies well with Wilfred C. Smith’s vision of (...)
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  • Harmony and the Mean in theNicomachean Ethics and theZhongyong.May Sim - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):253-280.
  • Confucian Ethics and Japanese Management Practices.Marc J. Dollinger - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):575 - 584.
    This paper proposes that an important method for understanding the ethics of Japanese management is the systematic study of its Confucian traditions and the writings of Confucius. Inconsistencies and dysfunction in Japanese ethical and managerial behavior can be attributed to contradictions in Confucius' writings and inconsistencies between the Confucian code and modern realities. Attention needs to be directed to modern Confucian philosophy since, historically Confucian thought has been an early warning system for impending change.
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  • Aesthetic Leadership in Chinese Business: A Philosophical Perspective. [REVIEW]Haina Zhang, Malcolm H. Cone, André M. Everett & Graham Elkin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):475-491.
    Confucian ethics play a pivotal role in guiding Chinese thinking and behaviour. Aesthetic leadership is emerging as a promising paradigm in leadership studies. This study investigates the practice of aesthetic leadership in Chinese organizations on the basis of Chinese philosophical foundations. We adopt a process perspective to access the aesthetic constellation of meanings present in the Chinese understanding of leadership, linking normative Confucian values to a pragmatic value rational world view, that rests on an ontology of vaguely defined norms that (...)
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  • A Humanist Synthesis of Memory, Language, and Emotions: Qian Mu’s Interpretation of Confucian Philosophy.Gad C. Isay - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):425-437.
    While Qian Mu intentionally avoided systematic philosophical arguments, his references to memory, language, and emotions, as expressed in a book he wrote in 1948, were suggestive of new interpretations of traditional Chinese, and especially Confucian, ideas such as human autonomy, mind, human nature, morality, immortality, and spirituality. The foremost contribution of Qian’s humanist synthesis rests in its articulation of the idea of the person. Across the context of memory, language, and emotions, the tiyong dynamics of mind and human nature recreate, (...)
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  • Ethics, Income and Religion.Kit-Chun Lam & Bill W. S. Hung - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):199-214.
    This paper investigates the relationship between ethics and income among individuals of different religions in the HKSAR of China. The presence of both traditional Chinese religion and Christianity from the West makes our study particularly interesting. The content of ethical beliefs varies with religion and thus the effect of ethics on income may also vary across religion. Furthermore, a reverse causal relationship may run from income to ethics. Since culture and taste affect the consumption behavior of a person, depending on (...)
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  • Original Mind and Cosmic Consciousness in the Co-Creative Process.Simone de La Tour & Kevin de La Tour - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):57-74.
    This article will investigate the issue of accessing benxin 本心 (original mind), subsequent operation from Self and, in that process, union with the greater universe or benti 本体 (original substance)—a state expressed in the West as cosmic consciousness. It is proposed that this allows one to participate as a partner in the creative process of one’s own life and the surrounding world. The equally important question of how to gain contact with original mind will also be addressed, as well as (...)
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  • Moral Obligation and Moral Motivation in Confucian Role-Based Ethics.A. T. Nuyen - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):1-11.
    How is the Confucian moral agent motivated to do what he or she judges to be right or good? In western philosophy, the answer to a question such as this depends on whether one is an internalist or externalist concerning moral motivation. In this article, I will first interpret Confucian ethics as role-based ethics and then argue that we can attribute to Confucianism a position on moral motivation that is neither internalist nor externalist but somewhere in between. I will then (...)
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  • Researching Corporate Social Responsibility: An Agenda for the 21st Century. [REVIEW]Paul C. Godfrey & Nile W. Hatch - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):87-98.
    Corporate social responsibility is a tortured concept. We review the current state of the art across a number of academic disciplines, from accounting to management to theology. In a world that is increasingly global and pluralistic, progress in our understanding of CSR must include theorizing around the micro-level processes practicing managers engage in when allocating resources toward social initiatives, as well as refined measurement of the outcomes of those initiatives on stakeholder and shareholder interests. Scholarship must also account for the (...)
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  • Human Nature and Virtue in Mencius and Xunzi: An Aristotelian Interpretation.Yu Jiyuan - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):11-30.
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  • Special Topic: Creativity in Christianity and Confucianism. [REVIEW]Robert Cummings Neville - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):125-130.
    In order respectfully and adequately to compare Confucian and Christian conceptions of creativity, it is necessary to have proper comparative categories. Put roughly, we need to know what creativity is in order to see how Confucianism and Christianity have various versions of it. In respect of what do they agree or differ? So the first order of business is to put forward, however briefly, a theory of creativity in light of which comparisons can be made. Creativity, of course, is a (...)
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