Citations of work:

David J. Chalmers (1993). Connectionism and Compositionality: Why Fodor and Pylyshyn Were Wrong.

10 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

  1.  22
    Dead Reckoning in the Desert Ant: A Defence of Connectionist Models.Christopher Mole - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):277-290.
    Dead reckoning is a feature of the navigation behaviour shown by several creatures, including the desert ant. Recent work by C. Randy Gallistel shows that some connectionist models of dead reckoning face important challenges. These challenges are thought to arise from essential features of the connectionist approach, and have therefore been taken to show that connectionist models are unable to explain even the most primitive of psychological phenomena. I show that Gallistel’s challenges are successfully met by one recent connectionist model, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  68
    The Explanatory Role of Computation in Cognitive Science.Nir Fresco - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (4):353-380.
    Which notion of computation (if any) is essential for explaining cognition? Five answers to this question are discussed in the paper. (1) The classicist answer: symbolic (digital) computation is required for explaining cognition; (2) The broad digital computationalist answer: digital computation broadly construed is required for explaining cognition; (3) The connectionist answer: sub-symbolic computation is required for explaining cognition; (4) The computational neuroscientist answer: neural computation (that, strictly, is neither digital nor analogue) is required for explaining cognition; (5) The extreme (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  3.  25
    Connectionist Semantic Systematicity.Stefan L. Frank, Willem F. G. Haselager & Iris van Rooij - 2009 - Cognition 110 (3):358-379.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  5
    Semiosis in Cognitive Systems.Graziano Terenzi - 2008 - Semiotica 2008 (171):131-162.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  14
    Semiosis in Cognitive Systems: A Neural Approach to the Problem of Meaning. [REVIEW]Eliano Pessa & Graziano Terenzi - 2007 - Mind and Society 6 (2):189-209.
    This paper deals with the problem of understanding semiosis and meaning in cognitive systems. To this aim we argue for a unified two-factor account according to which both external and internal information are non-independent aspects of meaning, thus contributing as a whole in determining its nature. To overcome the difficulties stemming from this approach we put forward a theoretical scheme based on the definition of a suitable representation space endowed with a set of transformations, and we show how it can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  6
    A Non‐Representational Approach to Imagined Action.Iris Rooij, Raoul M. Bongers & F. G. Haselager - 2002 - Cognitive Science 26 (3):345-375.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  2
    A Non-Representational Approach to Imagined Action.I. van Rooij - 2002 - Cognitive Science 26 (3):345-375.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  8.  16
    The Neurocomputational Mind Meets Normative Epistemology.Kenneth R. Livingston - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (1):33-59.
    The rapid development of connectionist models in computer science and of powerful computational tools in neuroscience has encouraged eliminativist materialist philosophers to propose specific alternatives to traditional mentalistic theories of mind. One of the problems associated with such a move is that elimination of the mental would seem to remove access to ideas like truth as the foundations of normative epistemology. Thus, a successful elimination of propositional or sentential theories of mind must not only replace them for purposes of our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  44
    Brain Symbols and Computationalist Explanation.William S. Robinson - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (1):25-44.
    Computationalist theories of mind require brain symbols, that is, neural events that represent kinds or instances of kinds. Standard models of computation require multiple inscriptions of symbols with the same representational content. The satisfaction of two conditions makes it easy to see how this requirement is met in computers, but we have no reason to think that these conditions are satisfied in the brain. Thus, if we wish to give computationalist explanations of human cognition, without committing ourselvesa priori to a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  26
    Connectionism, Classical Cognitivism, and the Relation Between Cognitive and Implementational Levels of Analysis.Keith Butler - 1993 - Philosophical Psychology 6 (3):321-33.
    This paper discusses the relation between cognitive and implementational levels of analysis. Chalmers (1990, 1993) argues that a connectionist implementation of a classical cognitive architecture possesses a compositional semantics, and therefore undercuts Fodor and Pylyshyn's (1988) argument that connectionist networks cannot possess a compositional semantics. I argue that Chalmers argument misconstrues the relation between cognitive and implementational levels of analysis. This paper clarifies the distinction, and shows that while Fodor and Pylyshyn's argument survives Chalmers' critique, it cannot be used to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations