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  1. Repetition and Difference: Lefebvre, le Corbusier and Modernity's (Im)Moral Landscape.Mick Smith - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):31 – 44.
    If, as Lefebvre argues, every society produces its own social space, then modernity might be characterized by that (anti-)social and instrumental space epitomized and idealized in Le Corbusier's writings. This repetitively patterned space consumes and regulates the differences between places and people; it encapsulates a normalizing morality that seeks to reduce all differences to an economic order of the Same. Lefebvre's dialectical conceptualization of 'difference' can both help explain the operation of this (im)moral landscape and offer the possibility of alternative (...)
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  • Rereading Beauvoir on the Question of Feminist Subjectivity.Emily Anne Parker - 2009 - Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):121-129.
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  • Luce Irigaray: Back to the Beginning.Ovidiu Anemtoaicei & Yvette Russell - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (5):773-786.
  • The Politics of Traumatic Temporality. Review of Time, Death, and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger by Tina Chanter.Stacy Keltner - 2003 - Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):306-315.
  • A Fine Risk To Be Run? The Ambiguity of Eros and Teacher Responsibility.Sharon Todd - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (1):31-44.
    Teachers are often placed in a space of tensionbetween responding to students as persons andresponding to students through theirinstitutionally-defined roles. Particularlywith respect to eros, which has becomeincreasingly the subject of strictinstitutional legislation and regulation,teachers have little recourse to a language ofresponsibility outside an institutional frame. By studying the significance of communicativeambiguity for responsibility, this paperexplores what is ethically at stake forteachers in erotic forms of communication. Specifically, it is Levinas's own ambiguousunderstanding of the ethical significance oferos, and what we have (...)
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  • The End of Man.Jean-Paul Martinon - 2013 - Punctum Books.
    Masculinity? This book attempts to answer this one-word question by revisiting key philosophical concepts in the construction of masculinity, not in order to re-write or debunk them again, but in order to provide a radically new departure to what masculinity means today. This new departure focuses on an understanding of sexuality and gender that is neither structured in oppositional terms nor in performative terms, but in a perpendicular relation akin to that which brings space and time together. In doing so, (...)
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  • Learning to Think Intercontinentally: Finding Australian Routes.Christine Battersby - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):1-17.
    : This introductory essay argues that it is a mistake to represent Australian feminist philosophy as a kind of discourse theory that is "downstream" of the French post-structuralists or North American postmodernists. Starting with the local--and the specifically Australian modes of racial exclusion, in particular--and exploring some of the byways of philosophy, what we encounter is a range of ontological, ethical, and political models that allow a reconfiguration of self, community, and social change.
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  • Asymmetrical Genders: Phenomenological Reflections on Sexual Difference.Silvia Stoller & Translated By Camilla R. Nielsen - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (2):7-26.
    One of the most fundamental premises of feminist philosophy is the assumption of an invidious asymmetry between the genders that has to be overcome. Parallel to this negative account of asymmetry we also find a positive account, developed in particular within the context of so-called feminist philosophies of difference. I explore both notions of gender asymmetry. The goal is a clarification of the notion of asymmetry as it can presently be found in feminist philosophy. Drawing upon phenomenology as well as (...)
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  • Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference.Joyce Davidson & Mick Smith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  • Coming Together: The Six Modes of Irigarayan Eros.Christopher Cohoon - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):478-496.
    Luce Irigaray's provocative vision of eros is often expressed in what Elizabeth Grosz calls “rambling and apparently disconnected” language, and nowhere in Irigaray's texts is it presented as a coherent account. With the goal of elaborating the significance of Irigaray's vision, I here set out to construct such an account. After first defining the Irigarayan erotic encounter as a paradoxical conjunction of “separation and alliance,” I then aim to show that its structure may be productively interpreted in terms of six (...)
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  • The Timing of Feminism.Robyn Ferrell - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):38-48.
    Is history a category of reason, or is reason a category of history? These opposing questions have divided the structuralist from the materialist-but neither question is wrong. Analysis of the logic of oppositions challenges feminism, in particular, to find a logic-and a poetics-in which to render its values without historical or theoretical naiveté. I explore the question of the timing of feminism through Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray.
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  • Simone de Beauvoir's Phenomenology of Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):114-132.
    The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
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  • Transforming Sacrifice: Irigaray and the Politics of Sexual Difference.Anne Caldwell - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):16-39.
    : This essay examines Irigaray's analysis of politics and the political implications of her critique of sacrificial orders that repress difference/matter. I suggest that her descriptions of a fluid "feminine" can be read as an alternative symbolic not dependent on repression. This idea is politically promising in opening a possibility for justice and a nonantagonistic intersubjectivity. I conclude by assessing Irigaray's concrete proposals for sexuate rights and a civil identity for women.
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  • Questions to Luce Irigaray.Kate Ince - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):122 - 140.
    This article traces the "dialogue" between the work of the philosophers Luce Irigaray and Emmanuel Levinas. It attempts to construct a more nuanced discussion than has been given to date of Irigaray's critique of Levinas, particularly as formulated in "Questions to Emmanuel Levinas" (Irigaray 1991). It suggests that the concepts of the feminine and of voluptuosity articulated by Levinas have more to contribute to Irigaray's project of an ethics of sexual difference than she herself sometimes appears to think.
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  • Copula: The Logic of the Sexual Relation.Robyn Ferrell - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):100-114.
    : This paper argues that the slogans "A Woman's Right to Choose" and "The Personal is the Political" typify different traditions within feminist thinking; one emphasizing rights and equality, the other the unconscious and the personal. The author responds to both traditions by bringing together mind and body, and reason and emotion, via the figure of the copula. The copula expresses an alternative model of identity which indicates that value can be produced only in relation.
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  • What Is Philosophy?Rosalyn Diprose - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of the (...)
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  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a 'phallocrat' and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: the Socratic dialectical position is not 'phallocratic' by Irigaray's own understanding of the term; that (...)
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  • The Style of the Speaking Subject: Irigaray's Empirical Studies of Language Production.Marjorie Hass - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):64-89.
    : I argue that Irigaray's linguistic research is not merely supplementary to her theoretical writing, but, in its depiction of sexed linguistic "styles," illuminates Irigaray's call for a new syntax. I show the effect of this research on her analysis of the unconscious meaning of interrogative expressions. I address the question of Irigaray's standing as a social scientist and argue that attention to her method reveals her positive program in this domain.
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  • The Other as Another Other.Karen Green - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):1-15.
    : De Beauvoir and Irigaray are archetypes of two opposed feminisms: egalitarian feminism and radical feminism of difference. Yet a filiation exists between de Beauvoir's claim, that women is Other, and Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman. This paper explores the relationship between de Beauvoir's and Irigaray's notion of otherness. It argues that Irigaray deforms de Beauvoir's categories, and that de Beauvoir provides a more coherent prospect for the development of an authentic feminine subjectivity.
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  • Generosity: Between Love and Desire.Rosalyn Diprose - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):1 - 20.
    "Safe sex" discourse attempts to protect women from dangers assumed inherent in erotic life, such as domination, submissiveness, and loss of freedom and self-control. However, Beauvoir's and Merleau-Ponty's revision of Sartre's ontology suggests that erotic life involves a kind of generosity that transforms existence; sex neither liberates personal existence nor poses a necessary threat to women's freedom. I also reconsider the conditions under which sex is assumed to involve a violation of being.
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  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  • Questions of Proximity: “Woman's Place” in Derrick and Irigaray.Ellen T. Armour - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):63-78.
    This article reconsiders the issue of Luce Irigaray's proximity to Jacques Derrida on the question of woman. I use Derrida's reading of Nietzsche in Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles (1979) and Irigaray's reading of Heidegger in L'Oubli de l'air (1983) to argue that reading them as supplements to one another is more accurate and more productive for feminism than separating one from the other. I conclude by laying out the benefits for feminism that such a reading would offer.
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  • What is a Woman? Butler and Beauvoir on the Foundations of the Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):20-39.
    The aim of this paper is to show that Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has been mistakenly interpreted as a theory of gender, because interpreters have failed adequately to understand Beauvoir's aims. Beauvoir is not trying to explain facts, events, or states of affairs, but to reveal, unveil, or uncover (découvrir) meanings. She explicates the meanings of woman, female, and feminine. Instead of a theory, Beauvoir's book presents a phenomenological description of the sexual difference.
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  • What is (Feminist) Philosophy?Rosalyn Diprose - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    : What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of (...)
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  • Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Kimerer L. Lamothe - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):120 - 149.
    Reading Hegel's 1827 Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion alongside his Phenomenology of Spirit, I argue that his vision for becoming a self-conscious subject-or seeing (oneself as) "spirit"-requires taking responsibility for the insight that every act of reason expresses an experience of sexual difference. It entails working to bring into being communities whose conceptions of gender and the absolute realize this idea.
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  • The Style of the Speaking Subject: Irigaray's Empirical Studies of Language Production.Marjorie Hass - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):64-89.
    I argue that Irigaray's linguistic research is not merely supplementary to her theoretical writing, but, in its depiction of sexed linguistic "styles," illuminates Irigaray's call for a new syntax. I show the effect of this research on her analysis of the unconscious meaning of interrogative expressions. I address the question of Irigaray's standing as a social scientist and argue that attention to her method reveals her positive program in this domain.
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  • Exceeding Hegel and Lacan: Different Fields of Pleasure Within Foucault and Irigaray.Shannon Winnubst - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):13-37.
    Anglo-American embodiments of poststructuralist and French feminism often align themselves with the texts of either Michel Foucault or Luce Irigaray. Interrogating this alleged distance between Foucault and Irigaray, I show how it reinscribes the phallic field of concepts and categories within feminist discourses. Framing both Foucault and Irigaray as exceeding Jacques Lacan's metamorphosis of G.W.F. Hegel's Concept, I suggest that engaging their styles might yield richer tools for articulating the differences within our different lives.
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  • Antigone's Nature.William Robert - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):412 - 436.
    Antigone fascinates G. W. F. Hegel and Luce Irigaray, both of whom turn to her in their explorations and articulations of ethics. Hegel and Irigaray make these re-turns to Antigone through the double and related lenses of nature and sexual difference. This essay investigates these figures of Antigone and the accompanying ethical accounts of nature and sexual difference as a way of examining Irigaray's complex relation to and creative uses of Hegel's thought.
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  • The Other as Another Other.Karen Green - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):1-15.
    De Beauvoir and Irigaray are archetypes of two opposed feminisms: egalitarian feminism and radical feminism of difference. Yet a filiation exists between de Beauvoir's claim, that women is Other, and Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman. This paper explores the relationship between de Beauvoir's and Irigaray's notion of otherness. It argues that Irigaray deforms de Beauvoir's categories, and that de Beauvoir provides a more coherent prospect for the development of an authentic feminine subjectivity.
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  • The Encounter Between Wonder and Generosity.Marguerite La Caze - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):1-19.
    : In a reading of René Descartes's The Passions of the Soul, Luce Irigaray explores the possibility that wonder, first of all passions, can provide the basis for an ethics of sexual difference because it is prior to judgment, and thus nonhierarchical. For Descartes, the passion of generosity gives the key to ethics. I argue that wonder should be extended to other differences and should be combined with generosity to form the basis of an ethics.
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  • Antigone's Ghost: Undoing Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Kelly Oliver - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (1):67 - 90.
    This essay argues that Hegel's discussion of the family in "The Ethical Order" section of Phenomenology of Spirit undermines the entire project of that text. Hegel's project demands that every element of consciousness be conceptualizable, and yet, woman, an essential unconscious element of consciousness, is in principle unconceptualizable. The end of the essay attempts to relate Hegel's discussion of the family to contemporary discussions of family values.
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  • Reading Irigaray, Dancing.Eluned Summers-Bremner - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):90-124.
    : My essay incorporates Irigaray's notion of the sensible transcendental, a dynamic attempt to reconstitute the body/mind dualism which founds Western thought, into a reading of the practice of European concert dance. I contend that Irigaray's efforts toward articulating a language of the body as active agent have much to offer (feminist) analyses of dance practice, and develop this claim through a reading which reflects philosophically on the changing nature of my own dance activity.
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  • The Diabolical Strategy of Mimesis: Luce Irigaray's Reading of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.Susan Kozel - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (3):114-129.
    In this essay I explore the dynamic between Luce Irigaray and Maurice Merleau-Ponty as it unfolds in An Ethics of Sexual Difference. Irigaray's strategy of mimesis is a powerful feminist tool, both philosophically and politically. Regarding textual engagement as analogous for relations between self and other beyond the text, I deliver a cautionary message: mimetic strategy is powerful but runs the risk of silencing the voice of the other.
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  • Receptacle/Ch?Ra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato'sTimaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2006 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 21 (4):124-146.
  • Book Review: Luce Irigaray. Translated by Alison Martin.I Love to You: Sketch for a Felicity Within History. New York: Routledge, 1996. [REVIEW]Penelope Deutscher - 1998 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 13 (2):170-174.
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  • Transforming Sacrifice: Irigaray and the Politics of Sexual Difference.Anne Caldwell - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):16-38.
    This essay examines Irigaray's analysis of politics and the political implications of her critique of sacrificial orders that repress difference/matter. I suggest that her descriptions of a fluid "feminine" can be read as an alternative symbolic not dependent on repression. This idea is politically promising in opening a possibility for justice and a nonantagonistic intersubjectivity. I conclude by assessing Irigaray's concrete proposals for sexuate rights and a civil identity for women.
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  • Copula: The Logic of the Sexual Relation.Robyn Ferrell - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):100-114.
    This paper argues that the slogans "A Woman's Right to Choose" and "The Personal is the Political" typify different traditions within feminist thinking; one emphasizing rights and equality, the other the unconscious and the personal. The author responds to both traditions by bringing together mind and body, and reason and emotion, via the figure of the copula. The copula expresses an alternative model of identity which indicates that value can be produced only in relation.
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  • The Diabolical Strategy of Mimesis: Luce Irigaray's Reading of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.Susan Kozel - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (3):114-129.
    In this essay I explore the dynamic between Luce Irigaray and Maurice Merleau-Ponty as it unfolds in An Ethics of Sexual Difference (1993). Irigaray's strategy of mimesis is a powerful feminist tool, both philosophically and politically. Regarding textual engagement as analogous for relations between self and other beyond the text, I deliver a cautionary message: mimetic strategy is powerful but runs the risk of silencing the voice of the other.
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  • Reading Irigaray, Dancing.Eluned Summers-Bremner - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):90-124.
    My essay incorporates Irigaray's notion of the sensible transcendental, a dynamic attempt to reconstitute the body/mind dualism which founds Western thought, into a reading of the practice of European concert dance. I contend that Irigaray's efforts toward articulating a language of the body as active agent have much to offer analyses of dance practice, and develop this claim through a reading which reflects philosophically on the changing nature of my own dance activity.
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  • The Sex of Nature: A Reinterpretation of Irigaray's Metaphysics and Political Thought.Alison Stone - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):60-84.
    I argue that Irigaray's recent work develops a theoretically cogent and politically radical form of realist essentialism. I suggest that she identifies sexual difference with a fundamental difference between the rhythms of percipient fluids constituting women's and men's bodies, supporting this with a philosophy of nature that she justifies phenomenologically and ethically. I explore the politics Irigaray derives from this philosophy, which affirms the sexes' rights to realize the possibilities of their rhythmically diverse bodies.
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  • A Critique of Normative Heterosexuality: Identity, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference in Beauvoir and Irigaray.Ofelia Schutte - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):40 - 62.
    The distinction between heterosexuality and homosexuality does not allow for sufficient attention to be given to the question of non-normative heterosexualities. This paper develops a feminist critique of normative sexuality, focusing on alternative readings of sex and/or gender offered by Beauvoir and Irigaray. Despite their differences, both accounts contribute significantly to dismantling the lure of normative sexuality in heterosexual relations-a dismantling necessary to the construction of a feminist social and political order.
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  • Tracing Sexual Difference: Beyond the Aporia of the Other. [REVIEW]Pamela Sue Anderson - 1999 - Sophia 38 (1):54-73.
  • Questions of Proximity:?Woman's Place? In Derrida and Irigaray.Ellen T. Armour - 1997 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 12 (1):63-78.
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  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    : In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a 'phallocrat' and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: (1) the Socratic dialectical position is not 'phallocratic' by Irigaray's own understanding of the (...)
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  • Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Simone de Beauvoir’s Phenomenology of Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):114-132.
    : The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
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  • The Encounter Between Wonder and Generosity.Marguerite La Caze - 2002 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (3):1-19.
    In a suggestive reading of Descartes’ The Passions of the Soul, Luce Irigaray explores the possibility that the passion of wonder, the first of all the passions, can provide the basis for an ethics of sexual difference. Wonder is the first of all passions because it has no opposite, is prior to judgment and comparison, and because it is united to most other passions. Wonder is surprise at the extraordinary, and Irigaray believes it is the ideal way for women and (...)
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  • An Examination of Irigaray's Commitment to Transcendental Phenomenology in The Forgetting of Air and The Way of Love.Anne Leeuwen - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):452-468.
    Although sexual difference is widely regarded as the concept that lies at the center of Luce Irigaray's thought, its meaning and significance is highly contested. This dissensus, however, attests to more than merely the existence of a recalcitrant conceptual ambiguity. That is, Irigaray's discussion of sexual difference remains fraught not because she leaves this concept undefined but because the centrality of sexual difference in fact marks a complex and unstable nexus of phenomena that shift throughout her work. Consequently, if Irigaray (...)
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  • The Sex of Nature: A Reinterpretation of Irigaray's Metaphysics and Political Thought.Alison Stone - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):60-84.
    : I argue that Irigaray's recent work develops a theoretically cogent and politically radical form of realist essentialism. I suggest that she identifies sexual difference with a fundamental difference between the rhythms of percipient fluids constituting women's and men's bodies, supporting this with a philosophy of nature that she justifies phenomenologically and ethically. I explore the politics Irigaray derives from this philosophy, which affirms the sexes' rights to realize the possibilities of their rhythmically diverse bodies.
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