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  1. Sustaining Sustainability in Organizations.Deborah E. de Lange, Timo Busch & Javier Delgado-Ceballos - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):151-156.
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  • Business Group Affiliation and Corporate Sustainability Strategies of Firms: An Investigation of Firms in India.Sougata Ray & Bikramjit Ray Chaudhuri - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):955-976.
    In spite of an overwhelming importance of business groups in the economic development of many countries, systematic inquiry on how the BGs and their affiliated firms approach and contribute to shared value creation and sustainable development is rare. In this paper we address this research gap by investigating two related questions—do BG-affiliated firms differ from non-BG firms in their corporate sustainability strategy and how does BG affiliation influence the relationship between stock of fungible resources and CSS of firms? Drawing from (...)
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  • Comparing Virtue, Consequentialist, and Deontological Ethics-Based Corporate Social Responsibility: Mitigating Microfinance Risk in Institutional Voids.Subrata Chakrabarty & A. Erin Bass - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):487-512.
    Due to the nature of lending practices and support services offered to the poor in developing countries, portfolio risk is a growing concern for the microfinance industry. Though previous research highlights the importance of risk for microfinance organizations, not much is known about how microfinance organizations can mitigate risks incurred from providing loans to the poor in developing countries. Further, though many microfinance organizations practice corporate social responsibility to help create economic and social wealth in developing countries, the impact of (...)
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  • Institutionalizing Ethics in Institutional Voids: Building Positive Ethical Strength to Serve Women Microfinance Borrowers in Negative Contexts.Subrata Chakrabarty & A. Erin Bass - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):1-14.
    This study examines whether microfinance institutions (MFIs) that serve women borrowers at the base of the economic pyramid are likely to adopt a written code of positive organizational ethics (POE). Using econometric analysis of operational and economic data of a sample of MFIs from across the world, we find that two contextual factors—poverty level and lack of women’s empowerment—moderate the influence of an MFI’s percentage of women borrowers on the probability of the MFI having a POE code. MFIs that serve (...)
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  • When Do Board and Management Resources Complement Each Other? A Study of Effects on Corporate Social Responsibility.Jeremy Galbreath - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):281-292.
    Following resource-based and complementary asset perspectives, this paper examines the effects of board and management resources on corporate social responsibility in a sample of large Australian public firms. Specifically, this study posits that outside directors and women on boards are complementary in that their multiplicative effect incrementally influences CSR above their individual, independent effects. The hypothesis is confirmed. Further, the study tests the interactive effect of a senior CSR manager, determining the independent and complementary effects of managerial resources upon board (...)
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  • The Influence of Unrelated and Related Diversification on Fraudulent Reporting.Subrata Chakrabarty - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (4):1-18.
    This study suggests that unrelated diversification has a positive influence on the probability of fraudulent reporting whereas related diversification has a negative influence on the probability of fraudulent reporting. The strength of the influence of these corporate level strategies is contingent on the moral character of the firm. Unrelated diversification provides opportunity for financial innovation within the firm’s internal capital market, which can result in fraudulent reporting. This is more likely when the moral character of the firm is driven by (...)
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  • The Influence of Leaders’ Stewardship Behavior on Innovation Success: The Mediating Effect of Radical Innovation.Emilio Domínguez-Escrig, Francisco Fermín Mallén-Broch, Rafael Lapiedra-Alcamí & Ricardo Chiva-Gómez - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    As stated by previous researchers, in an increasingly competitive environment, organizations need to develop successful innovations to compete and survive in the long term. Furthermore, sustainability and social issues are gaining increasing importance, to the extent that they are now a matter of high concern for firms and for society. Therefore, organizations cannot improve their results at any price and must be responsible for the consequences of their activities, including innovation. In these conditions, a growing demand for new leadership styles (...)
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  • The Influence of Unrelated and Related Diversification on Fraudulent Reporting.Subrata Chakrabarty - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (4):815-832.
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  • Jesuit, Catholic, and Green: Evidence From Loyola University Chicago.Omid Sabbaghi & Gerald F. Cavanagh - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):317-326.
    In this article, we investigate the relationship between religion, spirituality, and sustainability ethics. We focus on the sustainability efforts and channels that a Catholic Jesuit university employs in defining sustainability for business education and the global community through a consideration of the themes of social justice and the value of life. Specifically, we examine the model embraced by Loyola University Chicago , which promotes sustainability ethics and initiatives through their campus infrastructure, academic curriculum, and institutional culture. We examine emerging student-run (...)
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