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  1. Pro-Environmental Behavior and Socio-Demographic Factors in an Emerging Market.Jayesh Patel, Ashwin Modi & Justin Paul - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):189-214.
    We examine the role of socio-demographic factors on consumers’ pro-environmental behavior –a subset of ethical behavior and analyze its implications in an emerging market, with a sample study from India. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed as research method. Results show that males display higher PEB than their female counterparts. Married consumers score more on PEB than single. Mid-age consumers also score high on PEB than young and old-age consumers. Furthermore, highly educated consumers are more pro-environmentalist than graduates and post-graduates. (...)
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  • Exploring the Gap Between Consumers’ Green Rhetoric and Purchasing Behaviour.Micael-Lee Johnstone & Lay Peng Tan - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):311-328.
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  • Building Trust Between Consumers and Corporations: The Role of Consumer Perceptions of Transparency and Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Jiyun Kang & Gwendolyn Hustvedt - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-13.
    Developing trust in a company is a significant part of building the company-consumer relationship. Previous studies have sought to identify the positive consequences of trust such as loyalty and repurchase, but the question of what builds trust remains largely unanswered. To answer the question, we developed a model that depicts the relationships among transparency, social responsibility, trust, attitude, word-of-mouth (WOM) intention, and purchase intention. An online survey was conducted with a US nationwide sample of 303 consumers, and the data were (...)
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  • Business Cases and Corporate Engagement with Sustainability: Differentiating Ethical Motivations.Stefan Schaltegger & Roger Burritt - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (2):241-259.
    This paper explores links between different ethical motivations and kinds of corporate social responsibility activities to distinguish between different types of business cases with regard to sustainability. The design of CSR and corporate sustainability can be based on different ethical foundations and motivations. This paper draws on the framework of Roberts which distinguishes four different ethical management versions of CSR. The first two ethical motivations are driven either by a reactionary concern for the short-term financial interests of the business, or (...)
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  • Antecedents of Green Brand Equity: An Integrated Approach.Pui Fong Ng, Muhammad Mohsin Butt, Kok Wei Khong & Fon Sim Ong - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (2):203-215.
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  • Disentangling the Effects of Perceived Deception and Anticipated Harm on Consumer Responses to Deceptive Advertising.David Boush, Robert Madrigal & Guang-Xin Xie - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):281-293.
    Previous behavioral research on advertising deception has focused on the extent to which consumers would be misled by claims and implications of advertisements. The present research examines the effect of an important, but largely neglected, dimension: the severity of anticipated harm as a result of being deceived. Two experiments disentangle the effect of anticipated harm on consumer brand attitudes and purchase intentions from that of perceived deception. Interestingly, greater harmfulness increases diagnosticity of perceived deception, which partially accounts for consumers’ negative (...)
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  • Who Buys Overpackaged Grocery Products and Why? Understanding Consumers’ Reactions to Overpackaging in the Food Sector.Leila Elgaaïed-Gambier - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):683-698.
    While most studies dealing with waste reduction at the consumer level focus on recycling, this paper rather concentrates on precycling strategies and purchasing behaviors in order to understand how to promote waste reduction at the source. More specifically, the purpose of this work is to grasp consumers’ perceptions of overpackaging and understand the mechanisms underlying their choice of overpackaged versus non-overpackaged food products. Based on the different themes that emerged from a qualitative study, a quantitative research was conducted among French (...)
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  • “It’s Not Easy Living a Sustainable Lifestyle”: How Greater Knowledge Leads to Dilemmas, Tensions and Paralysis.Cristina Longo, Avi Shankar & Peter Nuttall - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (3):759-779.
    Providing people with information is considered an important first step in encouraging them to behave sustainably as it influences their consumption beliefs, attitudes and intentions. However, too much information can also complicate these processes and negatively affect behaviour. This is exacerbated when people have accepted the need to live a more sustainable lifestyle and attempt to enact its principles. Drawing on interview data with people committed to sustainability, we identify the contentious role of knowledge in further disrupting sustainable consumption ideals. (...)
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  • The Importance of Consumer Trust for the Emergence of a Market for Green Products: The Case of Organic Food.Krittinee Nuttavuthisit & John Thøgersen - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (2):323-337.
    Consumer trust is a key prerequisite for establishing a market for credence goods, such as “green” products, especially when they are premium priced. This article reports research on exactly how, and how much, trust influences consumer decisions to buy new green products. It identifies consumer trust as a distinct volition factor influencing the likelihood that consumers will act on green intentions and strongly emphasizes the needs to manage consumer trust as a prerequisite for the development of a market for green (...)
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  • The Impact of Option Popularity, Social Inclusion/Exclusion, and Self-Affirmation on Consumers’ Propensity to Choose Green Hotels.Yixing Lisa Gao & Anna S. Mattila - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):575-585.
    Previous research on consumers’ willingness to choose a green hotel has yielded mixed results, with some studies indicating a positive relationship with the hotel’s CSR initiatives, while others suggesting that there is no booking advantage for hotels going green. The present research seeks to understand the social nature of green hotel booking decisions and proposes a conceptual framework elucidating three primary factors that underlie consumers’ propensity to choose a green hotel. The study findings indicate that, importantly, a consumer’s social relationship (...)
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  • Gray Shades of Green: Causes and Consequences of Green Skepticism.Constantinos N. Leonidou & Dionysis Skarmeas - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):401-415.
    Consumer skepticism of corporate environmental activities is on the rise. Yet research on this timely, intriguing, and important topic is scarce for both academics and practitioners. Building on attribution theory, we develop and test a theoretically anchored model that explains the sources and consequences of green skepticism. The study findings reveal that consumers’ perceptions of industry norms, corporate social responsibility, and corporate history are important factors that explain why consumers assign different motives to corporate environmental actions. In addition, the results (...)
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  • Internalization of Environmental Practices and Institutional Complexity: Can Stakeholders Pressures Encourage Greenwashing?Francesco Testa, Olivier Boiral & Fabio Iraldo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (2):287-307.
    This paper analyzes the determinants underlying the internalization of proactive environmental management proposed by certifiable environmental management systems such as those set out in ISO 14001 and the European Management and Auditing Scheme. Using a study based on 232 usable questionnaires from EMAS-registered organizations, we explored the influence of institutional pressures from different stakeholders and the role of corporate strategy in the “substantial” versus “symbolic” integration of environmental practices. The results highlighted that although institutional pressures generally strengthen the internalization of (...)
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  • “They Did Not Walk the Green Talk!:” How Information Specificity Influences Consumer Evaluations of Disconfirmed Environmental Claims.Davide C. Orazi & Eugene Y. Chan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    While environmental claims are increasingly used by companies to appeal consumers, they also attract greater scrutiny from independent parties interested in consumer protection. Consumers are now able to compare corporate environmental claims against external, often disconfirming, information to form their brand attitudes and purchase intentions. What remains unclear is how the level of information specificity of both the environmental claims and external disconfirming information interact to influence consumer reactions. Two experiments address this gap in the CSR communication literature. When specific (...)
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  • The Effect of Online Protests and Firm Responses on Shareholder and Consumer Evaluation.Tijs van den Broek, David Langley & Tobias Hornig - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):279-294.
    Protests that target firms’ socially irresponsible behavior are increasingly organized via digital media. This study uses two methods to investigate the effects that online protests and mitigating firm responses have on shareholders’ and consumers’ evaluation. The first method is a financial analysis that includes an event study which measures the effect of online protests on the target firm’s share price, as well as an investigation of the boundary effects of protest characteristics. The second method is an online experiment that assesses (...)
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  • How the Market Values Greenwashing? Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):547-574.
    In China, many firms advertise that they follow environmentally friendly practices to cover their true activities, a practice called greenwashing, which can cause the public to doubt the sincerity of greenization messages. In this study, I investigate how the market values greenwashing and further examine whether corporate environmental performance can explain different and asymmetric market reactions to environmentally friendly and unfriendly firms. Using a sample from the Chinese stock market, I provide strong evidence to show that greenwashing is significantly negatively (...)
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