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  1. Genetic Enhancement Revisited: Response to Open Peer Commentaries.Ruiping Fan - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):6-8.
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  • Lost in ‘Culturation’: Medical Informed Consent in China.Vera Lúcia Raposo - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):17-30.
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  • Patient Engagement at the Household Level: A Feasible Way to Improve the Chinese Healthcare Delivery System Toward People-Centred Integrated Care.Ziyu Liu - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (3):408-420.
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  • The Confucian Bioethics of Surrogate Decision Making: Its Communitarian Roots.Ruiping Fan - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):301-313.
    The family is the exemplar community of Chinese society. This essay explores how Chinese communitarian norms, expressed in thick commitments to the authority and autonomy of the family, are central to contemporary Chinese bioethics. In particular, it focuses on the issue of surrogate decision making to illustrate the Confucian family-grounded communitarian bioethics. The essay first describes the way in which the family, in Chinese bioethics, functions as a whole to provide consent for significant medical and surgical interventions when a patient (...)
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  • Taking the Role of the Family Seriously in Treating Chinese Psychiatric Patients: A Confucian Familist Review of China’s First Mental Health Act.Ruiping Fan & Mingxu Wang - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):387-399.
    This essay argues that the Chinese Mental Health Act of 2013 is overly individualistic and fails to give proper moral weight to the role of Chinese families in directing the process of decision-making for hospitalizing and treating the mentally ill patients. We present three types of reactions within the medical community to the Act, each illustrated with a case and discussion. In the first two types of cases, we argue that these reactions are problematic either because they comply with the (...)
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  • Medical Decision Making and the Family: An Examination of Controversies.M. Wang, P. -C. Lo & R. Fan - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):493-498.
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  • A Family-Oriented Decision-Making Model for Human Research in Mainland China.Deng Rui - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):400-417.
    This essay argues that individual-oriented informed consent is inadequate to protect human research subjects in mainland China. The practice of family-oriented decision-making is better suited to guide moral research conduct. The family’s role in medical decision-making originates from the mutual benevolence that exists among family members, and is in accordance with family harmony, which is the aim of Confucian society. I argue that the practice of informed consent for medical research on human subjects ought to remain family-oriented in mainland China. (...)
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  • Toward a Confucian Family-Oriented Health Care System for the Future of China.Y. Cao, X. Chen & R. Fan - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (5):452-465.
    Recently implemented Chinese health insurance schemes have failed to achieve a Chinese health care system that is family-oriented, family-based, family-friendly, or even financially sustainable. With this diagnosis in hand, the authors argue that a financially and morally sustainable Chinese health care system should have as its core family health savings accounts supplemented by appropriate health insurance plans. This essay’s arguments are set in the context of Confucian moral commitments that still shape the background culture of contemporary China.
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