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  1. Quality Attestation for Clinical Ethics Consultants: A Two‐Step Model From the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities.Eric Kodish, Joseph J. Fins, Clarence Braddock, Felicia Cohn, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Marion Danis, Arthur R. Derse, Robert A. Pearlman, Martin Smith, Anita Tarzian, Stuart Youngner & Mark G. Kuczewski - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (5):26-36.
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  • Miracles, Scarce Resources, and Fairness.Steve Clarke - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):65-66.
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  • Grassroots Origins, National Engagement: Exploring the Professionalization of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists in Canada. [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):153-164.
    Canadian ethicists have a long legacy of leadership in advocating for standards and quality in healthcare ethics. Continuing this tradition, a grassroots organization of practicing healthcare ethicists (PHEs) concerned about the lack of standardization in the field recently formed to explore potential options related to professionalization. This group calls itself “practicing healthcare ethicists exploring professionalization” (PHEEP). This paper provides a description of the process by which PHEEP has begun to engage the Canadian PHE community in the development of practice standards (...)
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  • Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):171-171.
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt University (...)
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  • A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 2: Defining and Managing Conflicts. [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic & Paula Chidwick - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):19-29.
    This paper examines one aspect of professional practice for bioethicists: managing conflicts of interest. Drawing from our qualitative study and descriptive analysis of the experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests (COI) of 13 Canadian clinical bioethicists (Frolic and Chidwick 2010), this paper examines how bioethicists define their roles, the nature of COIs in their roles, how their COIs relate to conventional definitions of conflicts of interest, and how COIs can be most effectively managed.
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  • Conceptualizing Boundaries for the Professionalization of Healthcare Ethics Practice: A Call for Empirical Research.Nancy C. Brown & Summer Johnson McGee - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (4):325-341.
    One of the challenges of modern healthcare ethics practice is the navigation of boundaries. Practicing healthcare ethicists in the performance of their role must navigate meanings, choices, decisions and actions embedded in complex cultural and social relationships amongst diverse individuals. In light of the evolving state of modern healthcare ethics practice and the recent move toward professionalization via certification, understanding boundary navigation in healthcare ethics practice is critical. Because healthcare ethics is endowed with many boundaries which often delineate concerns about (...)
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  • Mapping Our Practice? Some Conceptual “Bumps” for Us to Consider.Christy Simpson - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):219-226.
    There are several important conceptual issues and questions about the practice of healthcare ethics that can, and should, inform the development of any practice standards. This paper provides a relatively short overview of seven of these issues, with the invitation for further critical reflection and examination of their relevance to and implications for practice standards. The seven issues described include: diversity (from the perspective of training and experience); moral expertise and authority/influence; being an insider or outsider; flexibility and adaptability (for (...)
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  • Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation?Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):73-84.
    Guiding our response in this essay is our view that current efforts to demarcate the role of the clinical ethicist risk reducing its complex network of authorizations to sites of power and payment. In turn, the role becomes susceptible to various ideologies—individualisms, proceduralisms, secularisms—that further divide the body from the web of significances that matter to that body, where only she, the patient, is located. The security of policy, standards, and employment will pull against and eventually sever the authorization secured (...)
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  • Education for Ethics Practice: Tailoring Curricula to Local Needs and Objectives. [REVIEW]Cheryl Cline, Ann Heesters, Barbara Secker & Andrea Frolic - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):227-243.
    Currently, there is no authoritative credentialing process for individuals engaged in ethics practice, no accreditation system that sets minimum education standards for programs aiming to prepare these individuals for their work, and little evidence available that any particular training model is actually achieving its pedagogical goals. At the same time, a number of healthcare organizations and universities now routinely offer post-graduate programs, clinical fellowships and in-house training specifically devised to prepare graduates for ethics practice. However, while their numbers appear to (...)
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  • From Reactive to Proactive: Developing a Valid Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey to Support Ethics Program Strategic Planning (Part 1 of 2). [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic, Barb Jennings, Wendy Seidlitz, Sandy Andreychuk, Angela Djuric-Paulin, Barb Flaherty & Donna Peace - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (1):47-60.
    As ethics committees and programs become integrated into the “usual business” of healthcare organizations, they are likely to face the predicament of responding to greater demands for service and higher expectations, without an influx of additional resources. This situation demands that ethics committees and programs allocate their scarce resources (including their time, skills and funds) strategically, rather than lurching from one ad hoc request to another; finding ways to maximize the effectiveness, efficiency, impact and quality of ethics services is essential (...)
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  • Beyond Trail Blazing: A Roadmap for New Healthcare Ethics Leaders (and the People Who Hire Them). [REVIEW]Cheryl Cline, Andrea Frolic & Robert Sibbald - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):211-227.
    This article is intended to serve as a roadmap to help new healthcare ethics leaders establish or renew an ethics program in a healthcare organization. The authors share a systemic step-by-step process for navigating this early career passage. In this paper, we describe five critical success strategies and provide explanations and concrete tools to help get you on the road to success as quickly and painlessly as possible. We will discuss how to define your role; diagnose your organization’s needs; build (...)
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  • Health Care Ethics Consultation: An Update on Core Competencies and Emerging Standards From the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities' Core Competencies Update Task Force.Anita Tarzian - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):3-13.
    Ethics consultation has become an integral part of the fabric of U.S. health care delivery. This article summarizes the second edition of the Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation report of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. The core knowledge and skills competencies identified in the first edition of Core Competencies have been adopted by various ethics consultation services and education programs, providing evidence of their endorsement as health care ethics consultation standards. This revised report was prompted by (...)
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  • Opening the Black Box of Ethics Policy Work: Evaluating a Covert Practice.Andrea Frolic, Katherine Drolet, Kim Bryanton, Carole Caron, Cynthia Cupido, Barb Flaherty, Sylvia Fung & Lori McCall - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):3-15.
    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) and ethicists generally describe themselves as engaged in four domains of practice: case consultation, research, education, and policy work. Despite the increasing attention to quality indicators, practice standards, and evaluation methods for the other domains, comparatively little is known or published about the policy work of HECs or ethicists. This article attempts to open the ?black box? of this health care ethics practice by providing two detailed case examples of ethics policy reviews. We also describe the (...)
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  • Uncovering the Real Work Behind Policy Development.Kevin M. Dirksen & Katherine Brown-Saltzman - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):20-22.
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  • Philosophy of Healthcare Ethics Practice Statements: Quality Attestation and Beyond.Lauren Notini - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (4):341-360.
    One element of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities’ recently-piloted quality attestation portfolio for clinical ethics consultants is a “philosophy of clinical ethics consultation statement” describing the candidate’s approach to clinical ethics consultation. To date, these statements have been under-explored in the literature, in contrast to philosophy statements in other fields such as academic teaching. In this article, I argue there is merit in expanding the content of these statements beyond clinical ethics consultation alone to describe the author’s approach (...)
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