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  1. Eusociality: From the First Foragers to the First States.Laura Betzig - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):1-5.
    People have always been social. Ethnographic evidence suggests that transfers of food and labor are common among contemporary hunter-gatherers, and they probably were common in Paleolithic groups. Archaeological evidence suggests that cooperative breeding went up as we settled down: as territory defenders became more successful breeders, their helpers’ fertility would have been delayed or depressed. And written evidence from the Neolithic suggests that the first civilizations were often eusocial; emperors fathered hundreds of children, who were provided for and protected by (...)
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  • Biotechnology and Naturalness in the Genomics Era: Plotting a Timetable for the Biotechnology Debate. [REVIEW]Hub Zwart - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):505-529.
    Debates on the role of biotechnology in food production are beset with notorious ambiguities. This already applies to the term “biotechnology” itself. Does it refer to the use and modification of living organisms in general, or rather to a specific set of technologies developed quite recently in the form of bioengineering and genetic modification? No less ambiguous are discussions concerning the question to what extent biotechnology must be regarded as “unnatural.” In this article it will be argued that, in order (...)
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  • From Pleistocene to Holocene: the prehistory of southwest Asia in evolutionary context.Trevor Watkins - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (3):22.
    In this paper I seek to show how cultural niche construction theory offers the potential to extend the human evolutionary story beyond the Pleistocene, through the Neolithic, towards the kind of very large-scale societies in which we live today. The study of the human past has been compartmentalised, each compartment using different analytical vocabularies, so that their accounts are written in mutually incompatible languages. In recent years social, cognitive and cultural evolutionary theories, building on a growing body of archaeological evidence, (...)
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  • "Worlds Otherwise": Archaeology, Anthropology, and Ontological Difference.Ben Alberti, Severin Fowles, Martin Holbraad, Yvonne Marshall & Chris Whitmore - unknown
    The debate concerning ontology is heating up in the social sciences. How is this impacting anthropology and archaeology? What contributions can these disciplines make? Following a session at the 2010 Theoretical Archaeology Group conference at Brown University (“‘Worlds Otherwise’: Archaeology, Theory, and Ontological Difference,” convened by Ben Alberti and Yvonne Marshall), a group of archaeologists and anthropologists have continued to discuss the merits, possibilities, and problems of an ontologically oriented approach. The current paper is a portion of this larger conversation— (...)
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  • Towards an Eco-Centric View of Human Existence: Implications of Genomics for the Environmental Zone.Hub Zwart - 2010 - Genomics, Society and Policy 6 (2):40-55.
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  • Between Modernism and Postmodernism: Lenski's "Power and Privilege" in the Study of Inequalities.Ann R. Tickamyer - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (2):247-257.
    Gerhard Lenski's classical work on stratification, "Power and Privilege", was an effort to reconcile and to synthesize different approaches to inequality incorporated into the grand theories of the day. It anticipated a variety of developments in the theoretical and empirical understanding of inequalities. These include recognition of the multiplicity of inequalities; emphasis on race, class, gender, and other sources and systems of domination and subordination; and the intersection of these factors in complex patterns to create different standpoints and life consequences. (...)
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  • Introduction: The Life, Career, and Social Thought of Gerhard Lenski: Scholar, Teacher, Mentor, Leader.Bernice McNair Barnett - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (2):163-193.
    This introduction provides an overview of the life, career, and social thought of Gerhard Lenski. Following a preliminary description of Lenski's contributions, this essay is divided into two sections. The first section examines the origins, education, and biographical influences on Lenski as a major social theorist as well as the intellectual foundation of his sociological theories. The second section presents Lenski's work, impact, and legacy and sets the stage for the original essays that are grouped around four of six key (...)
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  • Vico's Universe. La Provvedenza and la Poesia in the New Science of Giambattista Vico.G. W. Trompf - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (1):55 – 86.
  • Caradog Jones Lecture 1981: Natural Selection, Social Evolution and Economic Strategy.Robert A. Peel - 1981 - Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (4):377-390.
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  • Lenski Effects on Sex Stratification Theory.Joan Huber - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (2):258-268.
    This paper tries to explain why the Lenski (1970) theory of stratification based on ecology and subsistence technology had relatively little effect on theories of sex inequality. In cultural anthropology, generalization was held to be impossible. Feminist explanation in sociology was social-psychological. Moreover, by the 1980s, the bias against biology in feminist theory came to include all of science. Exceptions to these trends include the work of Blumberg, Chafetz, Collins, Coltrane, and Turner. Whether feminist sociologists will follow their lead remains (...)
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  • The Ecological-Evolutionary Typology of Human Societies and the Evolution of Social Inequality.FrançLois Nielsen - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (2):292-314.
    Gerhard Lenski's ecological-evolutionary typology of human societies, based on the level of technology of a society and the nature of its physical environment, is a powerful predictor of various dimensions of social inequality. Analysis of comparative data shows that while some dimensions of the stratification system (such as measures of social complexity) exhibit a monotonic trend of increasing inequality with level of technology from the hunting-and-gathering to the agrarian type, others (such as measures of freedom and sexual inequality among males) (...)
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  • Between Modernism and Postmodernism: Lenski's Power and Privilege in the Study of Inequalities.Ann R. Tickamyer - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (2):247-257.
    Gerhard Lenski's classical work on stratification, "Power and Privilege", was an effort to reconcile and to synthesize different approaches to inequality incorporated into the grand theories of the day. It anticipated a variety of developments in the theoretical and empirical understanding of inequalities. These include recognition of the multiplicity of inequalities; emphasis on race, class, gender, and other sources and systems of domination and subordination; and the intersection of these factors in complex patterns to create different standpoints and life consequences. (...)
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