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  1. Relational Personhood, Social Justice and the Common Good: Catholic Contributions Toward a Public Health Ethics: Articles.Brenda Appleby & Nuala P. Kenny - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):296-313.
    Worldwide, there is renewed public and political attention focused on public health fueled by the globally explosive H1N1 pandemic. Pandemic planning emerged as a major area for public action in the absence of an overarching ethics framework appropriate for the community and population focus of public health. Baylis, Sherwin, and Kenny propose relational personhood and relational solidarity as core values for a public health ethics. The Catholic faith tradition makes three useful contributions in support of a relational ethic: first, a (...)
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  • An Argument Against Drug Testing Welfare Recipients.Mary Jean Walker & James Franklin - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (3):309-340.
    Programs of drug testing welfare recipients are increasingly common in US states and have been considered elsewhere. Though often intensely debated, such programs are complicated to evaluate because their aims are ambiguous – aims like saving money may be in tension with aims like referring people to treatment. We assess such programs using a proportionality approach, which requires that for ethical acceptability a practice must be: reasonably likely to meet its aims, sufficiently important in purpose as to outweigh harms incurred, (...)
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  • Targeting and Tailoring an Intervention for Adolescents Who Are Overweight.Kirsti Riiser, Knut Løndal, Yngvar Ommundsen, Nina Misvær & Sølvi Helseth - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (2):237-247.
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  • Being Healthy, Being Sick, Being Responsible: Attitudes Towards Responsibility for Health in a Public Healthcare System.Gloria Traina, Pål E. Martinussen & Eli Feiring - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):145-157.
    Lifestyle-induced diseases are becoming a burden on healthcare, actualizing the discussion on health responsibilities. Using data from the National Association for Heart and Lung Diseases ’s 2015 Health Survey, this study examined the public’s attitudes towards personal and social health responsibility in a Norwegian population. The questionnaires covered self-reported health and lifestyle, attitudes towards personal responsibility and the authorities’ responsibility for promoting health, resource-prioritisation and socio-demographic characteristics. Block-wise multiple linear regression assessed the association between attitudes towards health responsibilities and individual (...)
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  • Trust and the Ethical Challenges in the Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Tuberculosis Surveillance: A Qualitative Study of Stakeholder Perspectives.Carly Jackson, Jennifer L. Gardy, Hedieh C. Shadiloo & Diego S. Silva - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):43.
    Emerging genomic technologies promise more efficient infectious disease control. Whole genome sequencing is increasingly being used in tuberculosis diagnosis, surveillance, and epidemiology. However, while the use of WGS by public health agencies may raise ethical, legal, and socio-political concerns, these challenges are poorly understood. Between November 2017 and April 2018, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 key stakeholders across the fields of governance and policy, public health, and laboratory sciences representing the major jurisdictions currently using WGS in national TB programs. (...)
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  • The Challenge of Community Engagement and Informed Consent in Rural Zambia: An Example From a Pilot Study.Joseph Mumba Zulu, Ingvild Fossgard Sandøy, Karen Marie Moland, Patrick Musonda, Ecloss Munsaka & Astrid Blystad - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):45.
    There is a need for empirically based research on social and ethical challenges related to informed consent processes, particularly in studies focusing on adolescent sexual and reproductive health. In a pilot study of a school-based pregnancy prevention intervention in rural Zambia, the majority of the guardians who were asked to consent to their daughters’ participation, refused. In this paper we explore the reasons behind the low participation in the pilot with particular attention to challenges related to the community engagement and (...)
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  • Ethics of Task Shifting in the Health Workforce: Exploring the Role of Community Health Workers in HIV Service Delivery in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.Hayley Mundeva, Jeremy Snyder, David Paul Ngilangwa & Angela Kaida - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):71.
    Task shifting is increasingly used to address human resource shortages impacting HIV service delivery in low- and middle-income countries. By shifting basic tasks from higher- to lower-trained cadres, such as Community Health Workers, task shifting can reduce overhead costs, improve community outreach, and provide efficient scale-up of essential treatments like antiretroviral therapies. Although there is rich evidence outlining positive outcomes that CHWs bring into HIV programs, important questions remain over their place in service delivery. These challenges often reflect concerns over (...)
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  • Compulsory Moral Bioenhancement Should Be Covert.Parker Crutchfield - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):112-121.
    Some theorists argue that moral bioenhancement ought to be compulsory. I take this argument one step further, arguing that if moral bioenhancement ought to be compulsory, then its administration ought to be covert rather than overt. This is to say that it is morally preferable for compulsory moral bioenhancement to be administered without the recipients knowing that they are receiving the enhancement. My argument for this is that if moral bioenhancement ought to be compulsory, then its administration is a matter (...)
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  • Public Health and Public Goods.Jonny Anomaly - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and political commitments to endorse public health measures, even if they disagree about precisely why they (...)
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  • Infant Male Circumcision and the Autonomy of the Child: Two Ethical Questions.Akim McMath - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):687-690.
  • Ethical Challenges in Research on Post-Abortion Care with Adolescents: Experiences of Researchers in Zambia.Joseph M. Zulu, Joseph Ali, Kristina Hallez, Nancy E. Kass, Charles Michelo & Adnan A. Hyder - forthcoming - Global Bioethics:1-16.
    ABSTRACTPost-abortion care research is increasingly being conducted in low- and middle-income countries to help reduce the high burden of unsafe abortion. This study aims to help addr...
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  • Adapting the Principles of Biomedical Ethics to Islamic Principles and Values in the Context of Public Health Policy.Forouzan Akrami, Abbas Karimi, Mahmoud Abbasi & Akbar Shahrivari - 2018 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 17 (49):46-59.
    Public health ethics is a subfield of bioethics that focuses on population health. This study aims to conform the principles of biomedical ethics to Islamic values in the context of public health. It culturally helps to optimize health care delivery. The approach is based on the method of immanent critique. The principle of the common good in Islam has a rational justification to draw public interests and ward off harms. The rule of “no harm”, with an emphasis on the preferability (...)
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  • A Public Health Perspective on Research Ethics.D. R. Buchanan & F. G. Miller - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):729-733.
    Ethical guidelines for conducting clinical trials have historically been based on a perceived therapeutic obligation to treat and benefit the patient-participants. The origins of this ethical framework can be traced to the Hippocratic oath originally written to guide doctors in caring for their patients, where the overriding moral obligation of doctors is strictly to do what is best for the individual patient, irrespective of other social considerations. In contrast, although medicine focuses on the health of the person, public health is (...)
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  • Assessment Model for the Justification of Intrusive Lifestyle Interventions: Literature Study, Reasoning and Empirical Testing.Michiel Wesseling, Lode Wigersma & Gerrit van der Wal - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundIn many countries health insurers, employers and especially governments are increasingly using pressure and coercion to enhance healthier lifestyles. For example by ever higher taxes on cigarettes and alcoholic beverages, and ever stricter smoke-free policies. Such interventions can enhance healthier behaviour, but when they become too intrusive, an unfree society can emerge. Which lifestyle interventions that use pressure or coercion are justifiable and which are not? We tried to develop an assessment model that can be used for answering this question, (...)
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  • The Ethics of Menu Labelling.Stacy M. Carter - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (1):94-97.
    In this commentary, I explore the ethically relevant dimensions of menu labelling. The evidence that menu labelling changes purchasing or consumption behaviour is contentious and inconclusive; there is some suggestion that menu labelling may preferentially influence the behaviour of healthier and wealthier citizens. Some suggest that menu labelling is unjust, as it fails to direct resources towards those who most need them. An alternative is to see menu labels as just one of a set of strategies that can increase people’s (...)
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  • Paternalistic Food and Beverage Policies: A Response to Conly.David B. Resnik - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):170-177.
    Sarah Conly defends paternalistic public health policies, such as New York City’s soft drink ban, on the grounds that they promote values that people accept but have difficulty realizing, owing to their cognitive biases. In this commentary, I criticize Conly’s defense of the soft drink ban and offer my own view of the justification for paternalistic food and beverage policies. I propose that paternalistic government restrictions on food and beverage choices should address a significant health problem pertaining to a specific (...)
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  • Public Bioethics.Jessica Flanigan - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (2):170-184.
    In this essay I argue that the same considerations that justify the strong commitment to anti-paternalism that has been affirmed in bioethics over the past half century, also calls for anti-paternalistic public health policies. First, I frame the puzzle—why are citizens morally entitled to make unhealthy and medically inadvisable decisions as patients but not as consumers? I then briefly sketch the reasons why bioethicists typically reject paternalism. Next, I argue that those same reasons tell against paternalism in public health ethics (...)
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  • Obesity, Identity and Community: Leveraging Social Networks for Behavior Change in Public Health.Norah Mulvaney-Day & Catherine A. Womack - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (3):250-260.
    Obesity is a public health problem influenced by behavioral patterns that span an ecological spectrum of individual-level factors, social network factors and environmental factors. Both individual and environmental approaches necessarily include significant influences from social networks, but how and under what conditions social networks influence behavior change is often not clearly mapped out either in the obesity literature or in many intervention designs. In this paper, we provide an analysis of recent empirical work in obesity research that explicates social network (...)
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  • Free Will Skepticism and Criminal Behavior: A Public Health-Quarantine Model.Gregg D. Caruso - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):25-48.
    One of the most frequently voiced criticisms of free will skepticism is that it is unable to adequately deal with criminal behavior and that the responses it would permit as justified are insufficient for acceptable social policy. This concern is fueled by two factors. The first is that one of the most prominent justifications for punishing criminals, retributivism, is incompatible with free will skepticism. The second concern is that alternative justifications that are not ruled out by the skeptical view per (...)
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  • Ethics of Incongruity: Moral Tension Generators in Clinical Medicine.Nicholas Kontos - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):244-248.
    Affectively uncomfortable concern, anxiety, indecisionand disputation over ‘right’ action are among the expressions of moral tension associated with ethical dilemmas. Moral tension is generated and experienced by people. While ethical principles, rules and situations must be worked through in any dilemma, each occurs against a backdrop of people who enact them and stand much to gain or lose depending on how they are applied and resolved. This paper attempts to develop a taxonomy of moral tension based on its intrapersonal and (...)
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  • Population Attitudes Towards Research Use of Health Care Registries: A Population-Based Survey in Finland.Katariina Eloranta & Anssi Auvinen - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):48.
    Register-based research can provide important and valuable contributions to public health research, but involves ethical issues concerning the balance of public health benefits and individual autonomy. This study aimed to describe the opinions of the Finnish public about these issues.
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  • The Public Interest, Public Goods, and Third-Party Access to UK Biobank.B. Capps - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):240-251.
    In 2007, the Ethics and Governance Council of the UK Biobank commissioned a Report on ‘Concepts of Public Good and Pubic Interest in Access Policies’. This study considered the Biobank’s role as a ‘public good’ in respect to supporting and promoting health throughout society. However, the conditions under which access by third parties to UK Biobank are justified in the public interest have not been well considered. In this article, I propose to analyse the conditions that should allow such access. (...)
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  • Pragma-Dialectics and Health Communication: Arguing for Behavioural Change in Advisory Health Brochures.Lotte van Poppel - unknown
    In this paper, it is argued that a pragma-dialectical perspective on advisory health brochures can complement current research in the medical domain and vice versa. Advisory health brochures are characterized as a particular communicative activity type to show how this context influences the argumentative process. It is argued that the quality of argumentation in health communication needs more attention. Insights from behavioural theory and persuasion research may help to detect possibly fallacious manoeuvres.
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  • The Meaning, Limitations and Possibilities of Making Palliative Care a Public Health Priority by Declaring It a Human Right.T. W. Kirk - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):84-92.
    There is a growing movement to increase access to palliative care by declaring it a human right. Calls for such a right—in the form of articles in the healthcare literature and pleas to the United Nations and World Health Organization—rarely define crucial concepts involved in such a declaration, in particular ‘palliative care’ and ‘human right’. This paper explores how such concepts might be more fully developed, the difficulties in using a human rights approach to promote palliative care, and the relevance (...)
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  • Payments to Normal Healthy Volunteers in Phase 1 Trials: Avoiding Undue Influence While Distributing Fairly the Burdens of Research Participation.A. S. Iltis - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):68-90.
    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups (...)
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  • Using Drones to Study Human Beings: Ethical and Regulatory Issues.David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (3):707-718.
    Researchers have used drones to track wildlife populations, monitor forest fires, map glaciers, and measure air pollution but have only begun to consider how to use these unmanned aerial vehicles to study human beings. The potential use of drones to study public gatherings or other human activities raises novel issues of privacy, confidentiality, and consent, which this article explores in depth. It argues that drone research could fall into several different categories: non-human subjects research, exempt HSR, or non-exempt HSR. In (...)
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  • Inclusion of Adolescent Women in Microbicide Trials: A Public Health Imperative!S. Pomfret, Q. A. Karim & S. R. Benatar - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):39-50.
    Conventional and well-established guidelines for the ethical conduct of clinical research are necessary but not sufficient for addressing research dilemmas related to public health research. There is a particular need for a public health ethics framework when, in the face of an epidemic, research is urgently needed to promote the common good. While there is limited experience in the use of a public health ethics framework, the value and potential of such an approach is increasingly being appreciated. Here we use (...)
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  • Ethical Aspects of Directly Observed Treatment for Tuberculosis: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW]Mette Sagbakken, Jan Frich, Gunnar Bjune & John Porter - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):25.
    Tuberculosis is a major global public health challenge, and a majority of countries have adopted a version of the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis, Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS). Drawing on results from research in Ethiopia and Norway, the aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss ethical aspects of the practice of Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) in a cross-cultural perspective.
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  • Ethical Frameworks in Public Health Decision-Making: Defending a Value-Based and Pluralist Approach.Kalle Grill & Angus Dawson - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (4):291-307.
    A number of ethical frameworks have been proposed to support decision-making in public health and the evaluation of public health policy and practice. This is encouraging, since ethical considerations are of paramount importance in health policy. However, these frameworks have various deficiencies, in part because they incorporate substantial ethical positions. In this article, we discuss and criticise a framework developed by James Childress and Ruth Bernheim, which we consider to be the state of the art in the field. Their framework (...)
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  • The Trade-Off Between Chicken Welfare and Public Health Risks in Poultry Husbandry: Significance of Moral Convictions.M. Van Asselt, E. D. Ekkel, B. Kemp & E. N. Stassen - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (2):293-319.
    Welfare-friendly outdoor poultry husbandry systems are associated with potentially higher public health risks for certain hazards, which results in a dilemma: whether to choose a system that improves chicken welfare or a system that reduces these public health risks. We studied the views of citizens and poultry farmers on judging the dilemma, relevant moral convictions and moral arguments in a practical context. By means of an online questionnaire, citizens and poultry farmers judged three practical cases, which illustrate the dilemma of (...)
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  • Professional Values in Community and Public Health Pharmacy.David Badcott - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):187-194.
    General practice (community) pharmacy as a healthcare profession is largely devoted to therapeutic treatment of individual patients whether in dispensing medically authorised prescriptions or by providing members of the public with over-the-counter advice and service for a variety of common ailments. Recently, community pharmacy has been identified as an untapped resource available to undertake important aspects of public health and in particular health promotion. In contrast to therapeutic treatment, public health primarily concerns the health of the entire population, rather than (...)
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  • An Ethical Analysis of Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Health Care Personnel: Implementing Fairly and Balancing Benefits and Burdens.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):30-37.
    Health care institutions have paid increasing attention to preventing nosocomial transmission of influenza through vaccination of health care personnel. While multifaceted voluntary interventions have increased vaccination rates, proponents of mandatory programs contend the rates remain unacceptably low. Conventional bioethical analyses of mandatory programs are inadequate; they fail to account for the obligations of nonprofessional personnel or to justify the weights assigned to different ethical principles. Using an ethics framework for public health permits a fuller analysis. The framework's focus on fairness (...)
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  • Mandatory Influenza Vaccination: How Far to Go and Whom to Target Without Evidence?Jean-Christophe Bélisle Pipon & Marjolaine Frenette - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):48-50.
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  • Evidence and Ethics in Mandatory Vaccination Policies.Jason L. Schwartz - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):46-48.
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  • The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials.Jim McCambridge, Kypros Kypri, Preben Bendtsen & John Porter - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):39-47.
    Some public health behavioral intervention research studies involve deception. A methodological imperative to minimize bias can be in conflict with the ethical principle of informed consent. As a case study, we examine the specific forms of deception used in three online randomized controlled trials evaluating brief alcohol interventions. We elaborate our own decision making about the use of deception in these trials, and present our ongoing findings and uncertainties. We discuss the value of the approach of pragmatism for examining these (...)
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  • In the Wake of Katrina: Has “Bioethics” Failed?Jonathan D. Moreno - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):W18-W19.
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  • Trans Fat Bans and Human Freedom.David Resnik - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):27-32.
    A growing body of evidence has linked consumption of trans fatty acids to cardiovascular disease. To promote public health, numerous state and local governments in the United States have banned the use of artificial trans fats in restaurant foods, and additional bans may follow. Although these policies may have a positive impact on human health, they open the door to excessive government control over food, which could restrict dietary choices, interfere with cultural, ethnic, and religious traditions, and exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities. (...)
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  • Cut the Fat! Defending Trans Fats Bans.Nathan Nobis & Molly Gardner - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):39 - 40.
    Is banning trans fat a bad policy? Resnik (2010) offers two general reasons for thinking so. First, because trans fat bans could lead to the government’s placing other objectionable restrictions upon food choices. Second, that, because we can adequately reduce trans fat consumption through education and mandatory labeling, bans are unnecessary. There are good reasons to reject both claims. First, since any slippery slope towards further restrictions on food choices is easily avoided, trans fat bans do not give the cause (...)
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  • Public Health Interventions Need to Meet the Same Standards of Medical Ethics as Individual Health Interventions.Michael Keane - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):36-38.
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  • “Listen to the People”: Public Deliberation About Social Distancing Measures in a Pandemic.Nancy Baum, Peter Jacobson & Susan Goold - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):4-14.
    Public engagement in ethically laden pandemic planning decisions may be important for transparency, creating public trust, improving compliance with public health orders, and ultimately, contributing to just outcomes. We conducted focus groups with members of the public to characterize public perceptions about social distancing measures likely to be implemented during a pandemic. Participants expressed concerns about job security and economic strain on families if businesses or school closures are prolonged. They shared opposition to closure of religious organizations, citing the need (...)
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  • Why Public Health and Politics Don't Mix.Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):3 – 4.
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  • Serious Ethical Violations in Medicine: A Statistical and Ethical Analysis of 280 Cases in the United States From 2008–2016. [REVIEW]Heidi A. Walsh, Jessica Mozersky, John T. Chibnall, Emily E. Anderson & James M. DuBois - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):16-34.
    Serious ethical violations in medicine, such as sexual abuse, criminal prescribing of opioids, and unnecessary surgeries, directly harm patients and undermine trust in the profession of medicine. We review the literature on violations in medicine and present an analysis of 280 cases. Nearly all cases involved repeated instances of intentional wrongdoing, by males in nonacademic medical settings, with oversight problems and a selfish motive such as financial gain or sex. More than half of cases involved a wrongdoer with a suspected (...)
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  • The Role of Screenings Methods and Risk Profile Assessments in Prevention and Health Promotion Programmes: An Ethnographic Analysis.Yvonne J. F. M. Jansen & Antoinette A. de Bont - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (4):389-401.
    In prevention and health promotion interventions, screening methods and risk profile assessments are often used as tools for establishing the interventions’ effectiveness, for the selection and determination of the health status of participants. The role these instruments fulfil in the creation of effectiveness and the effects these instruments have themselves remain unexplored. In this paper, we have analysed the role screening methods and risk profile assessments fulfil as part of prevention and health promotion programmes in the selection, enrolment and participation (...)
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  • Ethics of Health Care Practice in Humanitarian Crises.Matthew Robert Hunt - unknown
    Humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters can overwhelm the capacity of local and national agencies to respond to the needs of affected populations. In such cases, international relief organizations are frequently involved in the provision of emergency assistance. Health care professionals play a key role in these interventions. This practice environment is significantly different from the context of health care delivery in the home countries of expatriate health care professionals. Clinicians who travel from a developed nation to a resource-poor setting where (...)
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  • Omnipresent Health Checks May Result in Over-Responsibilization.Yrrah H. Stol, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Eva C. A. Asscher - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    Health checks identify disease in individuals without a medical indication. More and more checks are offered by more providers on more risk factors and diseases, so we may speak of an omnipresence of health checks. Current ethical evaluation of health checks considers checks on an individual basis only. However, omnipresent checks have effects over and above the effects of individual health checks. They might give the impression that health is entirely manageable by individual actions and strengthen the norm of individual (...)
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  • A Relational Account of Public Health Ethics.Françoise Baylis, Nuala P. Kenny & Susan Sherwin - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):196-209.
    oise Baylis, 1234 Le Marchant Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3P7. Tel.: (902)-494–2873; Fax: (902)-494-2924; Email: francoise.baylis{at}dal.ca ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Recently, there has been a growing interest in public health and public health ethics. Much of this interest has been tied to efforts to draw up national and international plans to deal with a global pandemic. It is common for these plans to state the importance of drawing upon a well-developed (...)
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  • Assuring Adequate Protections in International Health Research: A Principled Justification and Practical Recommendations for the Role of Community Oversight.D. Buchanan, S. Sifunda, N. Naidoo, S. James & P. Reddy - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):246-257.
    The analysis presented here lays out the ethical warrants for requiring community oversight of health research conducted in international settings. It reviews the inadequacies with the current standards of individual informed consent and research ethics committee review, and then, shows how a broader population-based public health perspective raises new demands on justice involving due consideration of the rights, harms and benefits to the community as a whole. As developed here, an ethical standard that requires community oversight of health research is (...)
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  • Global Child Health Ethics: Testing the Limits of Moral Communities.A. E. Denburg - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (3):239-258.
    This article attempts to map the broad ethical and legal contours of global child health realities. Its interest is in international duties to reduce disparities in the health of children. Specifically, it inquires into loci of collective rights and responsibilities in this context. Clarity on the sources of this responsibility and the nature of such rights will, it is hoped, contribute to enhanced and sustained action to attenuate these inequalities. A review and critique of the current topography of global health (...)
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  • Social Justice and Pandemic Influenza Planning: The Role of Communication Strategies.Connal Lee, Wendy A. Rogers & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):223-234.
    Department of Medical Education, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001. Tel. : +61-8-7225-1111; Fax: +61-8-8204-5675; Email: lee0359{at}flinders.edu.au ' + u + '@ ' + d + ' '/ /- ->.This paper analyses the role of communication strategies in pandemic influenza planning. Our central concern is with the extent to which nations are using communication to address issues of social justice. Issues associated with disadvantage and vulnerability to infection in the event of an influenza pandemic raise (...)
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  • Ethical Implications of Active Surveillance Cultures and Contact Precautions for Controlling Multidrug Resistant Organisms in the Hospital Setting.Michael Edmond, Laurie Lyckholm & Daniel Diekema - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):235-245.
    Healthcare-associated infections due to multidrug-resistant organisms continue to increase in incidence. To control the transmission of these pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , some have advocated active surveillance cultures of all hospitalized patients, followed by institution of contact precautions. While there has been extensive debate about the effectiveness of this approach in reducing infections, little attention has been given to the ethical issues raised by the intervention. Active surveillance for multidrug-resistant organisms is a quality improvement measure and ethical implications (...)
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