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  1. Exploring the Perceived Spectrum of Plagiarism: A Case Study of Online Learning.Valerie Denney, Zachary Dixon, Aman Gupta & Eric Hulphers - 2020 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (2):187-210.
    Scholarship on faculty and student perceptions of plagiarism is plagued by a vast, scattered constellation of perspectives, context, and nuance. Cultural, disciplinary, and institutional subtitles, among others in how plagiarism is defined and perspectives about it tested obfuscate consensus about how students and faculty perceive and understand plagiarism and what can or should be done about those perspectives. However, there is clear consensus that understanding how students and faculty perceive plagiarism is foundational to mitigating and preventing plagiarism. This study takes (...)
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  • Students’ Reasoning About Whether to Report When Others Cheat: Conflict, Confusion, and Consequences.Talia Waltzer, Arvid Samuelson & Audun Dahl - forthcoming - Journal of Academic Ethics:1-23.
    Nearly all students believe academic cheating is wrong, yet few students say they would report witnessed acts of cheating. To explain this apparent tension, the present research examined college students’ reasoning about whether to report plagiarism or other forms of cheating. Study 1 examined students’ conflicts when deciding whether to report cheating. Most students gave reasons against reporting a peer as well as reasons in favor of reporting. Study 2 provided experimental confirmation that the contextual factors referenced by Study 1 (...)
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  • A Wake-Up Call? Issues With Plagiarism in Transnational Higher Education.Anne Palmer, Mark Pegrum & Grace Oakley - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (1):23-50.
    The views on plagiarism of 574 students at four Australian universities operating in Singapore were investigated through a survey and interviews. Analysis of students’ responses to different plagiarism scenarios revealed misconceptions and uncertainties about many aspects of plagiarism. Self-plagiarism and reuse of a friend’s work were acceptable to more than one quarter of the students, and nearly half considered collusion to be a legitimate form of collaboration. One quarter of the students also indicated that they would knowingly plagiarize. This should (...)
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  • Plagiarism Intervention Using a Game-Based Tutorial in an Online Distance Education Course.Cheryl A. Kier - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (4):429-439.
    This project assesses the ability of a game tutorial, “Goblin Threat” to increase university students’ ability to recognize plagiarized passages. The game tutorial covers information about how to cite properly, types and consequences of plagiarism, and the differences between paraphrasing and plagiarism. The game involves finding and clicking on “goblins” who ask questions about various aspects of plagiarism. Sound effects and entertaining visuals work to keep students’ attention. One group of 177 students enrolled in an online Psychology of Adolescence course (...)
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  • Students’ Perceptions and Evaluations of Plagiarism: Effects of Text and Context.Talia Waltzer & Audun Dahl - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Education:1-16.