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  1. Interculturality as a Source of Organisational Positivity in Expatriate Work Teams: An Exploratory Study.Alexandre Anatolievich Bachkirov - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (3):391-405.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • An Inquiry Into Pseudo‐Legitimations: A Framework to Investigate the Clash of Managerial Legitimations and Employees' Unfairness Claims.Rasim Serdar Kurdoglu - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (1):129-138.
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  • A Complementary Perspective on Business Ethics in South Korea: Civil Religion, Common Misconceptions, and Overlooked Social Structures.Sven Horak & Inju Yang - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (1):1-14.
    Following the recent call for advancement in knowledge about business ethics in East Asia, this study proposes a complementary perspective on business ethics in South Korea. We challenge the conventional view that South Korea is a strictly collectivist country, where group norms and low trust determine the norms and values of behavior. Using the concept of civil religion, we suggest that the center of the South Korean civil religion can be seen in the affective ties and networks pervading the economic, (...)
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  • Ethical Consumer Decision‐Making: The Role of Need for Cognition and Affective Responses.Omneya Mokhtar Yacout & Scott Vitell - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (2):178-194.
    Most of the academic research in the field of consumer ethics has focused on the cognitive antecedents and processes of unethical consumer behavior. However, the specific roles of discrete emotions such as fear have not yet been investigated thoroughly. This research examines the role of the need for cognition, the three affective responses—fear, power, and excitement—and perceived issue importance on moral intensity, ethical perceptions, and ethical intentions for four types of unethical consumer behaviors. A sample of consumers from the two (...)
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