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Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care

Oxford University Press (1982)

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  1. Advance Directives in Psychiatric Care: A Narrative Approach.G. Widdershoven - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):92-97.
    Advance directives for psychiatric care are the subject of debate in a number of Western societies. By using psychiatric advance directives , it would be possible for mentally ill persons who are competent and with their disease in remission, and who want timely intervention in case of future mental crisis, to give prior authorisation to treatment at a later time when they are incompetent, have become non-compliant, and are refusing care. Thus the devastating consequences of recurrent psychosis could be minimised.Ulysses (...)
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  • Is Posthumous Semen Retrieval Ethically Permissible?R. D. Orr - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):299-302.
    It is possible to retrieve viable sperm from a dying man or from a recently dead body. This sperm can be frozen for later use by his wife or partner to produce his genetic offspring. But the technical feasibility alone does not morally justify such an endeavour. Posthumous semen retrieval raises questions about consent, the respectful treatment of the dead body, and the welfare of the child to be.We present two cases, discuss these three issues, and conclude that such requests (...)
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  • Ethical Values and Social Care Robots for Older People: An International Qualitative Study.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (1):49-68.
  • What the Eye Doesn't See: An Analysis of Strategies for Justifying Acts by an Appeal for Concealing Them.Agnes E. Tellings - 2006 - Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):363 – 375.
    This article analyzes the moral reasoning implied in a very commonly used expression, namely, "What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over", or "What you don't know won't hurt you." It especially deals with situations in which it is used for trying to justify acts that are, in themselves, reprehensible. For instance, when a cheating husband tries to justify his adultery by appealing to the alleged fact that he does not tell his wife about it and thus she (...)
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  • Paternalism Modernised.G. B. Weiss - 1985 - Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (4):184-187.
    The practice of paternalism has changed along with developments in medicine, philosophy, law, sociology and psychology. Physicians have learned that a patient's values are a factor in determining what is best for that patient. Modern paternalism continues to be guided by the principle that the physician decides what is best for the patient and pursues that course of action, taking into account the values and interests of the patient. In the autonomy model of the doctor-patient relationship, patient values are decisive. (...)
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  • Medical Paternalism - Part 1.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  • Technological Paternalism: On How Medicine has Reformed Ethics and How Technology Can Refine Moral Theory.Bjørn Hofmann - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):343-352.
    The objective of this article is to investigate ethical aspects of technology through the moral term “paternalism”. The field of investigation is medicine. The reason for this is twofold. Firstly, “paternalism” has gained moral relevance through modern medicine, where physicians have been accused of behaving paternalistic and threatening patients’ autonomy. Secondly, medicine is a brilliant area to scrutinise the evaluative aspects of technology. It is argued that paternalism is a morally relevant term for the ethics of technology, but that its (...)
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  • Governing [Through] Autonomy. The Moral and Legal Limits of “Soft Paternalism”.Bijan Fateh-Moghadam & Thomas Gutmann - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):383-397.
    Legal restrictions of the right to self-determination increasingly pretend to be compatible with the liberal concept of autonomy: they act upon a ‘soft’ or autonomy-orientated paternalistic rationale. Conventional liberal critique of paternalism turns out to be insensitive to the intricate normative problems following from ‘soft’ or ‘libertarian’ paternalism. In fact, these autonomy-oriented forms of paternalism could actually be even more problematic and may infringe liberty rights even more intensely than hard paternalistic regulation. This paper contributes to the systematic differentiation of (...)
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  • The Justification of Paternalistic Actions in Psychotherapy.Kerry Brace & Leon VandeCreek - 1991 - Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):87 – 103.
    This article defines the nature of paternalistic interventions in psychotherapy and discusses reasons why the client's right to consent to treatment is important. We describe a reasoning process developed by Culver and Gert (1982) that can be used to determine when paternalistic actions are and are not ethically justifiable in mental health practice. We demonstrate how this procedure may be applied to psychotherapy by using a number of case illustrations.
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  • Injury, Community and the Republic.Dan E. Beauchamp - 1989 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (1):42-49.
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  • Autonomy and Paternalism: Two Goals in Conflict.Elias S. Cohen - 1985 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (4):145-150.
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  • Autonomy and Paternalism: Two Goals in Conflict.Elias S. Cohen - 1985 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (4):145-150.