Switch to: References

Citations of:

Reflections On Language

Temple Smith (1976)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Reading the Minds of Others: Radical Interpretation and the Empirical Study of Childhood Cognitive Development.Manuela Ungureanu - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (3):527-554.
    RÉSUMÉ: Le point de vue de Davidson sur les concepts de croyance et de signification implicites dans nos pratiques d’attribution de croyance et de signification peut à bon droit être mis à l’épreuve par une élucidation de ses rapports avec la psychologie empirique. Mais une telle mise à l’épreuve n’a de valeur que si elle confronte d’abord l’id’e reçue voulant que sa position a peu ou pas de liens avec l’etude empirique du développement cognitif. Je défends ici une approche du (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Process of Reflective Teaching.Peter Silcock - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (3):273 - 285.
    The process of reflection is analysed into three components - an ego-driven purpose, a restructuring capability, and a transforming perspective. Different types of reflection are argued to be instances of cognitive restructuring determined by purpose and by context. Procedures for resolving contradictions in the literature concerning ways in which 'reflective teaching' can be fostered are also suggested. It is argued that adopting any single model of 'reflective practice' can be unnecessarily restrictive given the ubiquity of the reflective process. Finally, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Modelling, Dialogism and the Functional Cycle: Biosemiotic and Philosophical Insights.Susan Petrilli & Augusto Ponzio - 2013 - Sign Systems Studies 41 (1):93-113.
    Charles Peirce, Mikhail Bakhtin and Thomas Sebeok all develop original research itineraries around the sign and, despite terminological differences, canbe related with reference to the concept of dialogism and modelling. Jakob von Uexküll’s biosemiosic “functional cycle”, a model for semiosic processes, is alsoimplied in the relation between dialogue and communication.Biological models which describe communication as a self-referential, autopoietic and semiotically closed system contrast with both the linear and the circular paradigms. The theory of autopoietic systems is only incompatible with dialogism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Communication: Where Evolutionary Linguistics Went Wrong.Guillermo Lorenzo & Sergio Balari - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):228-239.
    In this article we offer a detailed assessment of current approaches to the origins of language, with a special foots on their historical and theoretical underpinnings. It is a widely accepted view within evolutionary linguistics that an account of the emergence of human language necessarily involves paying special attention to its communicative function and its relation to other animal communication systems. Ever since Darwin, some variant of this view has constituted the mainstream version in evolutionary linguistics; however, it is our (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Social Learning and Collective Choice.D. N. Osherson, M. Stob & S. Weinstein - 1987 - Synthese 70 (3):319 - 347.
    To be pertinent to democratic practice, collective choice functions need not apply to all possible constellations of individual preference, but only to those that are humanly possible in an appropriate sense. The present paper develops a theory of humanly possible preference within the context of the mathematical theory of learning. The theory of preference is then exploited in an attempt to resolve Arrow's voting paradox through restriction of the domain of majoritarian choice functions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Language Acquisition and EcoDevo Processes: The Case of the Lexicon-Syntax Interface.Sergio Balari, Guillermo Lorenzo & Sonia E. Sultan - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (3):148-160.
    Ecological developmental biology considers the phenotype as actively produced through an environmentally informed process of individual development, rather than predetermined by the genotype. Accordingly, the genotype is viewed as one among many interactants that contribute formative elements; it is understood to do so no differently from the way other organism-internal and environmental resources do. Although the EcoDevo approach is evidently particularly apt to inform approaches to human development, which mostly takes shape in rich cultural environments, it is remarkable that, at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Safe Takeoffs—Soft Landings.Douglas L. Medin, Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Jeffrey Bettger, Judy Florian, Robert Goldstone, Mary Lassaline, Arthur Markman, Joshua Rubinstein & Edward Wisniewski - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):169-178.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Økonomi Som En Videnskab Om Bevidstheden Og Interaktion.Michael Fast, Frederik Hertel & Woodrow Clark - unknown
    In understanding economics and the organisation of economics, the questions are what constituteeconomics and the thinking behind economics today? In short what is the field of economics? And in what ways can we connect to and understand this field of study? Of course, the answer to this depends upon the perspective chosen, in which one sees and thinks of economics from a particular philosophical and even political position and perspective. If one takes the perspective on economics from a qualitative paradigm (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Language as a Phenomenon of the Third Kind.Ewa Dąbrowska - 2020 - Cognitive Linguistics 31 (2):213-229.
    While many linguists view language as either a cognitive or a social phenomenon, it is clearly both: a language can live only in individual minds, but it is learned from examples of utterances produced by speakers engaged in communicative interaction. In other words, language is what calls a “phenomenon of the third kind”, emerging from the interaction of a micro-level and a macro-level. Such a dual perspective helps us understand some otherwise puzzling phenomena, including “non-psychological” generalizations, or situations where a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • ([How/Why]) Does Linguistics Matter to Philosophy?Francis Jeffry Pelletier - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):393-426.
  • A Defense of Materialism Against Attacks Based on Qualia.Jeffrey Charles Beall - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Qualia--the "what it's like features" of minds--pose a great challenge to a materialist view of the world. The two strongest and most popular objections to materialism based on qualia are the Zombie Argument and the Knowledge Argument. The current dissertation defends materialism against these two popular arguments. ;I argue that if zombie worlds exist, then qualia cause no physical events--they're epiphenomenal$\sb{\rm p},$ or epiphenomenal with respect to the physical domain of our world. I argue, however, that there is good reason (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Innateness and the Sciences.Matteo Mameli & Patrick Bateson - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):155-188.
    The concept of innateness is a part of folk wisdom but is also used by biologists and cognitive scientists. This concept has a legitimate role to play in science only if the colloquial usage relates to a coherent body of evidence. We examine many different candidates for the post of scientific successor of the folk concept of innateness. We argue that none of these candidates is entirely satisfactory. Some of the candidates are more interesting and useful than others, but the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  • Connectionism, Modularity, and Tacit Knowledge.Martin Davies - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (December):541-55.
    In this paper, I define tacit knowledge as a kind of causal-explanatory structure, mirroring the derivational structure in the theory that is tacitly known. On this definition, tacit knowledge does not have to be explicitly represented. I then take the notion of a modular theory, and project the idea of modularity to several different levels of description: in particular, to the processing level and the neurophysiological level. The fundamental description of a connectionist network lies at a level between the processing (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Can Empirical Theories of Semantic Competence Really Help Limn the Structure of Reality?Steven Gross - 2006 - Noûs 40 (1):43–81.
    There is a long tradition of drawing metaphysical conclusions from investigations into language. This paper concerns one contemporary variation on this theme: the alleged ontological significance of cognitivist truth-theoretic accounts of semantic competence. According to such accounts, human speakers’ linguistic behavior is in part empirically explained by their cognizing a truth-theory. Such a theory consists of a finite number of axioms assigning semantic values to lexical items, a finite number of axioms assigning semantic values to complex expressions on the basis (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The Mindreader and the Scientist.Heidi Maibom - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (3):296-315.
    Among theory theorists, it is commonly thought that folk psychological theory is tacitly known. However, folk psychological knowledge has none of the central features of tacit knowledge. But if it is ordinary knowledge, why is it that we have difficulties expressing anything but a handful of folk psychological generalisations? The reason is that our knowledge is of theoretical models and hypotheses, not of universal generalisations. Adopting this alternative view of (scientific) theories, we come to see that, given time and reflection, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Causality.Jessica M. Wilson - 2006 - In Jessica Pfeifer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. pp. 90--100.
    Arguably no concept is more fundamental to science than that of causality, for investigations into cases of existence, persistence, and change in the natural world are largely investigations into the causes of these phenomena. Yet the metaphysics and epistemology of causality remain unclear. For example, the ontological categories of the causal relata have been taken to be objects (Hume 1739), events (Davidson 1967), properties (Armstrong 1978), processes (Salmon 1984), variables (Hitchcock 1993), and facts (Mellor 1995). (For convenience, causes and effects (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Meno—a Cognitive Psychological View.Benny Shanon - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (2):129-147.
  • Consequences of a Simple Extension of the Dutch Book Argument.J. M. Ryder - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):164-167.
  • Can Popperians Learn to Talk?Stephen P. Stich - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):157-164.
  • Between Chomskian Rationalism and Popperian Empiricism.Stephen P. Stich - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (December):329-47.
  • Knowledge of Language. [REVIEW]F. B. D'agostino - 1977 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (1):74-80.
  • On Anthropological Knowledge.Dan Sperber - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
  • Knowledge and Lotteries. [REVIEW]Steffen Borge - 2006 - Disputatio 1 (20):361-368.
  • Intuitions in Linguistics.Michael Devitt - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (3):481-513.
    Linguists take the intuitive judgments of speakers to be good evidence for a grammar. Why? The Chomskian answer is that they are derived by a rational process from a representation of linguistic rules in the language faculty. The paper takes a different view. It argues for a naturalistic and non-Cartesian view of intuitions in general. They are empirical central-processor responses to phenomena differing from other such responses only in being immediate and fairly unreflective. Applying this to linguistic intuitions yields an (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Emerging Technologies and the Future of Philosophy.Philippe Verdoux - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (5):682-707.
    This article examines how a class of emerging technologies—specifically, radical cognitive enhancements and artificial intelligence—has the potential to influence the future of philosophy. The article argues that progress in philosophy has been impeded, in part, by two specific constraints imposed on us by the natural architecture of our cognitive systems. Both of these constraints, though, could in principle be overcome by certain cognitive technologies currently being researched and/or developed. It surveys a number of these technologies, and then looks at a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Music, Mind and Programs.Lelio Camilleri - 1986 - Diogenes 34 (133):47-59.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Five Marks of the Mental.Tuomas K. Pernu - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    The mental realm seems different to the physical realm; the mental is thought to be dependent on, yet distinct from the physical. But how, exactly, are the two realms supposed to be different, and what, exactly, creates the seemingly insurmountable juxtaposition between the mental and the physical? This review identifies and discusses five marks of the mental, features that set characteristically mental phenomena apart from the characteristically physical phenomena. These five marks (intentionality, consciousness, free will, teleology, and normativity) are not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Reorganization of the Connectivity Between Elementary Functions – A Model Relating Conscious States to Neural Connections.Jesper Mogensen & Morten Overgaard - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  • Bringing Back the Body Into the Mind: Gestures Enhance Word Learning in Foreign Language.Manuela Macedonia - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Children’s Interpretation of Ambiguous Wh-Adjuncts in Mandarin Chinese.Jing Li & Peng Zhou - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Exactly is Universal Grammar, and has Anyone Seen It?Ewa Dąbrowska - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Is Cognition Enough to Explain Cognitive Development?Linda B. Smith & Adam Sheya - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):725-735.
    Traditional views separate cognitive processes from sensory–motor processes, seeing cognition as amodal, propositional, and compositional, and thus fundamentally different from the processes that underlie perceiving and acting. These were the ideas on which cognitive science was founded 30 years ago. However, advancing discoveries in neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, and psychology suggests that cognition may be inseparable from processes of perceiving and acting. From this perspective, this study considers the future of cognitive science with respect to the study of cognitive development.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Facilitation by Variation: Right‐to‐Left Learning of English Yes/No Questions.Bruno Estigarribia - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (1):68-93.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Understanding How Input Matters: Verb Learning and the Footprint of Universal Grammar.Jeffrey Lidz, Henry Gleitman & Lila Gleitman - 2003 - Cognition 87 (3):151-178.
  • Productivity of Noun Slots in Verb Frames.Anna L. Theakston, Paul Ibbotson, Daniel Freudenthal, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1369-1395.
    Productivity is a central concept in the study of language and language acquisition. As a test case for exploring the notion of productivity, we focus on the noun slots of verb frames, such as __want__, __see__, and __get__. We develop a novel combination of measures designed to assess both the flexibility and creativity of use in these slots. We do so using a rigorously controlled sample of child speech and child directed speech from three English-speaking children between the ages of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Representation of Principled Connections: A Window Onto the Formal Aspect of Common Sense Conception.Sandeep Prasada & Elaine M. Dillingham - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (3):401-448.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Constraints on Constraints: Surveying the Epigenetic Landscape.Frank C. Keil - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):135-168.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition: A Probabilistic Perspective.Anne S. Hsu & Nick Chater - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):972-1016.
    Natural language is full of patterns that appear to fit with general linguistic rules but are ungrammatical. There has been much debate over how children acquire these “linguistic restrictions,” and whether innate language knowledge is needed. Recently, it has been shown that restrictions in language can be learned asymptotically via probabilistic inference using the minimum description length (MDL) principle. Here, we extend the MDL approach to give a simple and practical methodology for estimating how much linguistic data are required to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Do Grammars Minimize Dependency Length?Daniel Gildea & David Temperley - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (2):286-310.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Literal Meaning and Psychological Theory.Raymond W. Gibbs - 1984 - Cognitive Science 8 (3):275-304.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Poverty of the Stimulus Revisited.Robert C. Berwick, Paul Pietroski, Beracah Yankama & Noam Chomsky - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1207-1242.
    A central goal of modern generative grammar has been to discover invariant properties of human languages that reflect “the innate schematism of mind that is applied to the data of experience” and that “might reasonably be attributed to the organism itself as its contribution to the task of the acquisition of knowledge” (Chomsky, 1971). Candidates for such invariances include the structure dependence of grammatical rules, and in particular, certain constraints on question formation. Various “poverty of stimulus” (POS) arguments suggest that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Shake, Rattle, 'N' Roll: The Representation of Motion in Language and Cognition.Anna Papafragou - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):189-219.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Thinking May Be More Than Computing.Peter Kugel - 1986 - Cognition 22 (2):137-198.
  • Children's Thinking: What Never Develops?Frank Keil - 1981 - Cognition 10 (1-3):159-166.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Is Neurolinguistics Ready for Reductionism?Samuel H. Greenblatt - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):467-467.
  • The Semantics and Acquisition of Number Words: Integrating Linguistic and Developmental Perspectives.Julien Musolino - 2004 - Cognition 93 (1):1-41.
    This article brings together two independent lines of research on numerally quantified expressions, e.g. two girls. One stems from work in linguistic theory and asks what truth conditional contributions such expressions make to the utterances in which they are used--in other words, what do numerals mean? The other comes from the study of language development and asks when and how children learn the meaning of such expressions. My goal is to show that when integrated, these two perspectives can both constrain (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Ahistorical Homology and Multiple Realizability.Sergio Balari & Guillermo Lorenzo - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):881-902.
    The Mind-Brain Identity Theory lived a short life as a respectable philosophical position in the late 1950s, until Hilary Putnam developed his famous argument on the multiple realizability of mental states. The argument was, and still is, taken as the definitive demonstration of the falsity of Identity Theory and the foundation on which contemporary functionalist computational cognitive science was to be grounded. In this paper, in the wake of some contemporary philosophers, we reopen the case for Identity Theory and offer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Faculty Disputes.John Collins - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (5):503-33.
    Jerry Fodor, among others, has maintained that Chomsky's language faculty hypothesis is an epistemological proposal, i.e. the faculty comprises propositional structures known (cognized) by the speaker/hearer. Fodor contrasts this notion of a faculty with an architectural (directly causally efficacious) notion of a module. The paper offers an independent characterisation of the language faculty as an abstractly specified nonpropositional structure of the mind/brain that mediates between sound and meaning—a function in intension that maps to a pair of structures that determine soundmeaning (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Peculiarities in Mind; Or, on the Absence of Darwin.Tanya de Villiers-Botha - 2011 - South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):282-302.
    A key failing in contemporary philosophy of mind is the lack of attention paid to evolutionary theory in its research projects. Notably, where evolution is incorporated into the study of mind, the work being done is often described as philosophy of cognitive science rather than philosophy of mind. Even then, whereas possible implications of the evolution of human cognition are taken more seriously within the cognitive sciences and the philosophy of cognitive science, its relevance for cognitive science has only been (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Syntax and Semantics of Questions.Lauri Karttunen - 1977 - Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (1):3--44.
    W. Labov's & T. Labov's findings concerning their child grammar acquisition ("Learning the Syntax of Questions" in Recent Advances in the Psychology of Language, Campbell, R. & Smith, P. Eds, New York: Plenum Press, 1978) are interpreted in terms of different semantics of why & other wh-questions. Z. Dubiel.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   219 citations