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  1. Are Healthcare Workers Obligated to Risk Themselves During the COVID-19 Pandemic According to Jewish Law? A Response to Solnica Et Al.Azgad Gold - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106622.
    Solnica et al argue that “Jewish law and modern secular approaches based on professional responsibilities obligate physicians to care for all patients even those with communicable diseases”. The authors base their viewpoint on the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer Waldenberg and apply it to suggest that physicians are obligated to endanger themselves during epidemics, such as COVID-19. It is argued that Solnica et al’s analysis of Rabbi Waldenberg’s text and their conclusion that healthcare workers are obligated to endanger themselves while treating (...)
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  • ‘Healthcare Heroes’: Problems with Media Focus on Heroism From Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Caitríona L. Cox - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):510-513.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, the media have repeatedly praised healthcare workers for their ‘heroic’ work. Although this gratitude is undoubtedly appreciated by many, we must be cautious about overuse of the term ‘hero’ in such discussions. The challenges currently faced by healthcare workers are substantially greater than those encountered in their normal work, and it is understandable that the language of heroism has been evoked to praise them for their actions. Yet such language can have potentially negative consequences. Here, I (...)
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  • The Healthcare Worker at Risk During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Jewish Ethical Perspective.Amy Solnica, Leonid Barski & Alan Jotkowitz - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):441-443.
    The current COVID-19 pandemic has raised many questions and dilemmas for modern day ethicists and healthcare providers. Are physicians, nurses and other healthcare workers morally obligated to put themselves in harm’s way and treat patients during a pandemic, occurring a great risk to themselves, their families and potentially to other patients? The issue was relevant during the 1918 influenza epidemic and more recently severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in 2003. Since the risk to the healthcare workers was great, there was (...)
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  • ‘Your Country Needs You’: The Ethics of Allocating Staff to High-Risk Clinical Roles in the Management of Patients with COVID-19.Michael Dunn, Mark Sheehan, Joshua Hordern, Helen Lynne Turnham & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):436-440.
    As the COVID-19 pandemic impacts on health service delivery, health providers are modifying care pathways and staffing models in ways that require health professionals to be reallocated to work in critical care settings. Many of the roles that staff are being allocated to in the intensive care unit and emergency department pose additional risks to themselves, and new policies for staff reallocation are causing distress and uncertainty to the professionals concerned. In this paper, we analyse a range of ethical issues (...)
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  • Balancing the Duty to Treat with the Duty to Family in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic.Doug McConnell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):360-363.
    Healthcare systems around the world are struggling to maintain a sufficient workforce to provide adequate care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Staffing problems have been exacerbated by healthcare workers refusing to work out of concern for their families. I sketch a deontological framework for assessing when it is morally permissible for HCWs to abstain from work to protect their families from infection and when it is a dereliction of duty to patients. I argue that it is morally permissible for HCWs to (...)
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  • Duty to Provide Care to Ebola Patients: The Perspectives of Guinean Lay People and Healthcare Providers.Lonzozou Kpanake, Tamba Kallas Tonguino, Paul Clay Sorum & Etienne Mullet - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (9):599-605.
    AimTo examine the views of Guinean lay people and healthcare providers regarding the acceptability of HCPs’ refusal to provide care to Ebola patients.MethodFrom October to December 2015, lay people and HCPs in Conakry, Guinea, were presented with 54 sample case scenarios depicting a HCP who refuses to provide care to Ebola patients and were instructed to rate the extent to which this HCP’s decision is morally acceptable. The scenarios were composed by systematically varying the levels of four factors: the risk (...)
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  • Strangers No More: Genuine Interdisciplinarity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Joseph J. Fins - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):16 – 17.
  • Even Stranger Still: Moral Experience as a Significant Focus for Research Ethics Consultation.Stuart G. Finder - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):22 – 23.
  • Keeping Society From the Benchside.John H. Evans - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):14 – 16.
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  • Experts at the Benchside.Peter T. Saunders - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):20 – 21.
  • Any Help From Strangers at the Benchside?Albert R. Jonsen - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):19 – 20.
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Strangers at the Beachside: Research Ethics Consultation”.Mildred K. Cho, Sara L. Tobin, Henry T. Greely, Jennifer McCormick, Angie Boyce & David Magnus - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):4-6.
    Institutional ethics consultation services for biomedical scientists have begun to proliferate, especially for clinical researchers. We discuss several models of ethics consultation and describe a team-based approach used at Stanford University in the context of these models. As research ethics consultation services expand, there are many unresolved questions that need to be addressed, including what the scope, composition, and purpose of such services should be, whether core competencies for consultants can and should be defined, and how conflicts of interest should (...)
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  • Toward a Better Bioethics.Jason Scott Robert - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):283-291.
    It has been argued that bioethicists too often tend to represent the interests of scientists and not of the broader polity. Indeed, bioethicists seem predisposed to discard the voices and viewpoints of all but the cognoscenti . Focusing particularly on human pluripotent stem cell research, this commentary explores a variety of characterizations of bioethics and bioethicists in relation to forbidding science. Rather than proselytizing or prohibiting, bioethicists should work in partnership with scientists and publics to craft scientifically well-informed and morally (...)
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  • CQ Sources/Bibliography.Bette Anton - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):348-350.
    These CQ Sources were compiled by Bette Anton.
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  • Does Science Need Bioethicists? Ethics and Science Collaboration in Biomedical Research.Angeliki Kerasidou & Michael Parker - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (4):214-226.
    Biomedical research is an increasingly multidisciplinary activity bringing together a range of different academic fields and forms of expertise to investigate diseases that are increasingly understood to be complex and multifactorial. Recently the discipline of ethics has been starting to find a place in large-scale biomedical collaborations. In this article we draw from our experience of working with the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network and other research projects to reflect upon the integration of ethics into biomedical research. We examine the way (...)
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  • Beyond the IRB: Local Service Versus Global Oversight.David Magnus & Molly Havard - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):1-2.
  • From Strangers to Partners: Emerging Forms of Research Ethics Consultation.Michele A. Carter & Susan S. Night - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):29 – 31.
  • Research Ethics Consultation at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.David B. Resnik - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):40 – 42.
  • Stranger at the Consultation: Increasing the Diversity in Research Ethics Consultation.Alan Jotkowitz & Ari Z. Zivotofsky - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):25 – 26.
  • Toward a Comprehensive Research Ethics Consultation Service.Kenneth W. Goodman & Robin N. Fiore - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):31 – 32.
  • Research Ethics Consultations: A Canadian Perspective Using Research Ethicists.Marleen Van Laethem & Blair Henry - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):35 – 37.
  • Sharing Data and Experience: Using the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) “Moral Community” to Improve Research Ethics Consultation.Maureen Kelley, Kelly Fryer-Edwards, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Thomas H. Gallagher & Benjamin Wilfond - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):37 – 39.
  • Being Directly Responsive and Accountable to Human-Research Participants.David A. Fleming & Don Reynolds - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):24 – 25.
  • Conflicts of Interest in Research Ethics Consultation: Where to Go From Here?Bethany Spielman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):17 – 18.
  • Our Two Cents: Research Ethics Consultation at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.Holly A. Taylor & Nancy E. Kass - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):33 – 35.
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  • The Role of Family Liaisons in Research Ethics Consultations.Halle Showalter Salas, Zuraya Aziz & Douglas S. Diekema - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):27 – 28.
  • Expedited Industry-Sponsored Translational Research: A Seductive but Hazardous Cocktail?Jonathan H. Marks - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):56-58.
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  • CQ Sources/Bibliography.Bette Anton - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):155-158.
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