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  1. Theory in Psychology: A Review Essay of Andre Kukla's Methods of Theoretical Psychology. [REVIEW]Huib Looren de Jong, Sacha Bem & Maurice Schouten - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):275 – 295.
    This review essay critically discusses Andre Kukla's Methods of theoretical psychology. It is argued that Kukla mistakenly tries to build his case for theorizing in psychology as a separate discipline on a dubious distinction between theory and observation. He then argues that the demise of empiricism implies a return of some form of rationalism, which entails an autonomous role for theorizing in psychology. Having shown how this theory-observation dichotomy goes back to traditional and largely abandoned ideas in epistemology, an alternative (...)
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  • Introduction: Reappraising Paul Feyerabend.Matthew J. Brown & Ian James Kidd - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 57:1-8.
    This volume is devoted to a reappraisal of the philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. It has four aims. The first is to reassess his already well-known work from the 1960s and 1970s in light of contemporary developments in the history and philosophy of science. The second is to explore themes in his neglected later work, including recently published and previously unavailable writings. The third is to assess the contributions that Feyerabend can make to contemporary debate, on topics such as perspectivism, realism, (...)
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  • Restoring Misplaced Epistemology.Christopher J. Preston - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):373 – 384.
  • Pluralism and Naturalism: Why the Proliferation of Theories is Good for the Mind.Christopher J. Preston - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (6):715 – 735.
    A number of those that have advocated for theoretical pluralism in epistemology suggest that naturalistic arguments from cognitive science can support their case. Yet these theorists have traditionally faced two pressing needs. First, they have needed a cognitive science adequate to the task. Second, they have needed a bridge between whatever scientific account of cognition they favor and the normative claims of a pluralistic epistemology. Both of these challenges are addressed below in an argument for theoretical pluralism that brings together (...)
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