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  1. Robert Boyle's Coat of Many Colours.Jan Golinski - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (1):209-217.
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  • Chemical-Medical Studies on Urinary Calculi in 17th Century English Literature.Ana M. Alfonso-Goldfarb & Marica Helena Mendes Ferraz - 2014 - Circumscribere: International Journal for the History of Science 14:73-82.
    vincenzo Galilei - father of Galileo Galilei- was a music theorist and lutenist. In his treatises he advocated that music was primarily based on physical phenomena, namely sound, and dismissed the Pythagorean-Platonic musical tradition based.
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  • Alchemical Theories of Matter.Antonio Clericuzio - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (2):369-375.
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  • Morbus-Locke's Early Essay On Disease.Jonathan Walmsley - 2000 - Early Science and Medicine 5 (4):367-393.
    John Locke engaged in a systematic study of medicine from the late 1650's. In this period he acquainted himself with the three main competing natural philosophical theories of the time-Galenism, Paracelsianism and Mechanism. He was particularly interested in the work of Sennert, Helmont and Boyle. In 1666, just after the publication of Boyle's The Origine of Formes and Qualities, Locke wrote a short paper entitled Morbus. This paper gave Locke's own view of the nature of disease. Locke went out of (...)
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  • Van Helmont’s Hybrid Ontology and its Influence on the Chemical Interpretation of Spirit and Ferment.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):103-112.
    This essay proposes to discuss the manner in which Jan Baptista van Helmont helped to transform the Neoplatonic notions of vital spirit and of ferment by giving these notions an unambiguously chemical interpretation, thereby influencing the eventual naturalization of these ideas in the work of late seventeenth century chymists. This chemical interpretation of vital spirit and ferment forms part of Helmont’s hybrid ontology, which fuses a corpuscular conception of minima naturalia with a non-corporeal conception of semina rerum. For Helmont, chemical (...)
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  • “Sooty Empiricks” and Natural Philosophers: The Status of Chemistry in the Seventeenth Century.Antonio Clericuzio - 2010 - Science in Context 23 (3):329-350.
  • Robert Boyle and Seventeenth-Century Chemistry: A Second Look.Antonio Clericuzio - 2016 - Metascience 25 (1):103-110.
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  • The Alchemical Sources of Robert Boyle's Corpuscular Philosophy.William R. Newman - 1996 - Annals of Science 53 (6):567-585.
    Summary Robert Boyle is remembered largely for his integration of experiment and the ?mechanical philosophy?. Although Boyle is occasionally elusive as to what he means precisely by the ?mechanical philosophy?, it is clear that a major portion of it concerned his corpuscular theory of matter. Historians of science have traditionally viewed Boyle's corpuscular philosophy as the grafting of a physical theory onto a previously incoherent body of alchemy and iatrochemistry. As this essay shows, however, Boyle owed a heavy debt to (...)
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  • Robert Boyle on God's “Experiments”: Resurrection, Immortality and Mechanical Philosophy.Salvatore Ricciardo - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (1):97-113.