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  1. “Say Your Favorite Poet in the World is Lying There”: Eileen Myles, James Schuyler, and the Queer Intimacies of Care.Libbie Rifkin - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (1):79-88.
    This article closely reads “Chelsea Girls,” an autobiographical short story by Eileen Myles that depicts her experience caring for the diabetic, bipolar poet James Schuyler when she was a young writer getting started in East Village in the late 1970s. Their dependency relationship is a form of queer kinship, an early version of the caring relations between lesbians and gay men that HIV/aids would demand over the next two decades as chosen families emerged to nurture gay men and lesbians rejected (...)
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  • Timing Problems: When Care and Violence Converge in Stephen King's Horror Novel Christine.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):397-414.
    Judith Butler, Joan Tronto, and Stephen King all hinge human experience on shared ontological vulnerability, but whereas Butler and Tronto use vulnerability to build ethical commitments, King exploits aging, disability, and death to frighten us. King's horror genre is provocative for the imaginative landscape of feminist theory precisely because he uses vulnerability to magnify the anxieties of mass culture. In Christine, the characters' shared susceptibility to psychic and physical injury blurs the boundary between care and violence. Like Butler, King depicts (...)
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