Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Logic of Deferral: Educational Aims and Intellectual Disability.Ashley Taylor - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):265-285.
    The educational aims described by educational philosophers rarely embrace the full range of differences in intellectual ability, adaptive behavior, or communication that children exhibit. Because envisioned educational aims have significant consequences for how educational practices, pedagogy, and curricula are conceptualized, the failure to acknowledge and embrace differences in ability leaves open the question of the extent to which students with intellectual disabilities are subject to the same aims as their “typically-developing” peers. In articulating and defending valued aims of education, educational (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Democratizing Disability: Achieving Inclusion Through “Participatory Parity”.Amber Knight - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):97-114.
    More than two decades after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act , people with disabilities continue to live at the margins of American democracy and capitalist society. This persistent exclusion poses a conundrum to political theorists committed to disability rights, multiculturalism, and social justice. Drawing from feminist insights, specifically the work of Nancy Fraser, among others, I examine the necessary conditions for meaningful inclusion to be realized within a deliberative democracy. Using Fraser's concept of “participatory parity” as a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Care, Disability, and Violence: Theorizing Complex Dependency in Eva Kittay and Judith Butler.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):217-233.
    How do we theorize the experiences of caregivers abused by their children with autism without intensifying stigma toward disability? Eva Kittay emphasizes examples of extreme vulnerability to overturn myths of independence, but she ignores the possibility that dependents with disabilities may be vulnerable and aggressive. Instead, her work over-emphasizes caregivers' capabilities and the constancy of disabled dependents' vulnerability. I turn to Judith Butler's ethics and her conception of the self as opaque to rethink care amid conflict. Person-centered planning approaches, pioneered (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Reply to Svärd, Nurse, and Ryland. Donaldson & Kymlicka - 2013 - Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (2):208.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark