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  1. The Woman in Black: Exposing Sexist Beliefs About Female Officials in Elite Men’s Football.Carwyn Jones & Lisa Louise Edwards - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):202-216.
    In this paper, we argue that there are important differences between playing and non-playing roles in sport. The relevance of sex differences poses genuine philosophical and ethical difficulties for feminism in the context of playing sport. In the case of non-playing roles in general, and officiating in particular, we argue that reference to essential differences between men and women is irrelevant. Officiating elite men?s football is not a role for which ?essential? (psychological and biological) differences are causally implicated neither in (...)
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  • Something’s Got to Give: Reconsidering the Justification for a Gender Divide in Sport.Andria Bianchi - 2019 - Philosophies 4 (2):23-0.
    The question of whether transgender athletes should be permitted to compete in accordance with their gender identity is an evolving debate. Most competitive sports have male and female categories. One of the primary challenges with this categorization system, however, is that some transgender athletes may be prevented from competing in accordance with their gender identity. The reason for this restriction is because of the idea that transgender women have an unfair advantage over their cisgender counterparts; this is seen as a (...)
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  • Is It Defensible for Women to Play Fewer Sets Than Men in Grand Slam Tennis?Paul Davis & Lisa Edwards - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):388-407.
    Lacking in the philosophy of sport is discussion of the gendered numbers of sets played in Grand Slam tennis. We argue that the practice is indefensible. It can be upheld only through false beliefs about women or repressive femininity ideals. It treats male tennis players unfairly in forcing them to play more sets because of their sex. Its ideological consequences are pernicious, since it reinforces the respective identifications of the female and male with physical limitation and heroism. Both sexes have (...)
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  • Beyond Fairness: The Ethics of Inclusion for Transgender and Intersex Athletes.John Gleaves & Tim Lehrbach - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (2):311-326.
    Sporting communities remain entangled in debate over whether and how to include transgender and intersex athletes in competition with cisgender athletes. Of particular concern is that transgender and intersex athletes may have unfair physiological advantages over their cisgender opponents. Arguments for inclusion of transgender and intersex athletes in sport attempt to demonstrate that such inclusion does not threaten the presumed physiological equivalence among competitors and is therefore fair to all. This article argues that the physiological equivalency rationale has significant limitations, (...)
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  • The Onus of Inclusivity: Sport Policies and the Enforcement of the Women’s Category in Sport.Sarah Teetzel - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):113-127.
    With recent controversies surrounding the eligibility of athletes with disorders of sex development and hyperandrogenism, as well as continued discussion of the conditions transgender athletes must meet to compete in high-performance sport, a wide array of scholars representing a diverse range of disciplines have weighed in on both the appropriateness of classifying athletes into the female and male categories and the best practices of doing so. In response to cases of high-profile athletes’ sex being called into question, the International Olympic (...)
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  • Mixed Competition and Mixed Messages.Pam R. Sailors - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):65-77.
    A survey of the philosophy of sport literature reveals that arguments regarding the issue of sex segregation in athletics have been advanced from time to time, but there has been little sustained discussion, no consensus, and no change in existing practice. In this paper, an effort to advance the conversation, I begin with Jane English’s seminal 1978 article as a springboard and employ existing literature on the question of sex segregation in order to raise difficulties with English’s analysis and outline (...)
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  • Sport and the Obligation of Solidarity.Wivi Andersen & Sigmund Loland - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (3):243-256.
    The paper departs from an analysis of the case of Michelle Dumaresq, a transgender female downhill mountain biker who experienced marginalization within her sport. The analysis is based on Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition. The Dumaresq case is particularly relevant to Honneth’s ideas of solidarity, which provide insight into the dynamics of social integration. Honneth’s theory of recognition also provides a conceptual framework and a methodology that gives new perspectives on the ethical significance of sport. In the paper, an analysis (...)
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  • The New IOC and IAAF Policies on Female Eligibility: Old Emperor, New Clothes?Paul Davis & Lisa Edwards - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (1):44-56.
    The Caster Semenya debacle touched off by the 2009 Berlin World Athletics Championships resulted finally in IOC and IAAF abandonment of sex testing, which gave way to procedures that make female competition eligibility dependent upon the level of serum testosterone, which must be below the male range or instrumentally countered by androgen resistance. We argue that the new policy is unsustainable because (i) the testosterone-performance connection it posits is uncompelling; (ii) testosterone-induced female advantage is not ipso facto unfair advantage; (iii) (...)
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  • On Being 'Probably Slightly on the Wrong Side of the Cheating Thing'.Mike McNamee - 2009 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (3):283-285.
    (2009). On being ‘probably slightly on the wrong side of the cheating thing’. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 283-285. doi: 10.1080/17511320903364063.
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  • In the Halfway House of Ill Repute: Gender Verification Under a Different Name, Still No Contribution to Fair Play.Maren Behrensen - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (4):450-466.
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