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  1. Equal Representation Does Not Mean Equal Opportunity: Women Academics Perceive a Thicker Glass Ceiling in Social and Behavioral Fields Than in the Natural Sciences and Economics.Ruth van Veelen & Belle Derks - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    In the study of women in academia, the focus is often particularly on women’s stark underrepresentation in the math-intensive fields of natural sciences, technology, and economics. In the non-math-intensive of fields life, social and behavioral sciences, gender issues are seemingly less at stake because, on average, women are well-represented. However, in the current study, we demonstrate that equal gender representation in LSB disciplines does not guarantee women’s equal opportunity to advance to full professorship—to the contrary. With a cross-sectional survey among (...)
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  • Do Corporate Customers Prefer Socially Responsible Suppliers? An Instrumental Stakeholder Theory Perspective.Ran Tao, Jian Wu & Hong Zhao - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    This paper studies the way supplier firms’ corporate social responsibility affects their likelihood of being selected as new suppliers. Using a large sample of US public firms with detailed supply chain and CSR data, we provide empirical evidence that corporate customers prefer socially responsible suppliers, and that the effect is more prominent when the supplier industry is more competitive, the customer’s own CSR performance is better, or the supplier and the customer have more similar CSR focuses. Our paper contributes to (...)
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  • The Effect of Gender on Investors’ Judgments and Decision-Making.Yi Luo & Steven E. Salterio - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):237-258.
    We examine whether an unsophisticated investor’s own gender interacts with gender of a sell-side equity analyst to affect the investor’s judgment. Prior research shows two potential sources of gender-based discrimination that affect female investors. First, female investors’ advisors offer less risky hence lower return portfolios to female investors than to male investors with similar risk preferences as female investors are perceived as more risk adverse. Second, female equity analysts are subject to greater barriers to enter and advance in investment firms (...)
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  • The Glass Ceiling for Women Managers: Antecedents and Consequences for Work-Family Interface and Well-Being at Work.Audrey Babic & Isabelle Hansez - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Despite significant promotion of diversity in companies, as well as legislation for equal opportunities for women and men, it must be noted that women still remain largely in the minority in decision-making positions. This observation reflects the phenomenon of the glass ceiling that constitutes vertical discrimination within companies against women. Although the glass ceiling has generated research interest, some authors have pointed out that theoretical models have made little attempt to develop an understanding of this phenomenon and its implications. Therefore, (...)
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  • Partner Gender Differences in Prestige of Clients Served at the Largest U.S. Audit Firms.Elizabeth D. Almer, M. Kathleen Harris, Julia L. Higgs & Joseph R. Rakestraw - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):401-421.
    Despite tremendous investment to promote gender equity, U.S. public accounting firms continue to be gendered organizations. Our archival study examines gender equity within the partnership of these large firms for a one-year period. We find female partners are clustered in lower prestige client types including investment funds, benefit plans, and single audits, rather than higher prestige public company clients. Second, we consider whether there is gender bias in prestige of client served by female partners who lead public company audits. In (...)
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