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  1. Cosmopolitan Regard and the Particularity Problem.Neil Hibbert - 2013 - Journal of International Political Theory 9 (1):78-91.
    This paper addresses Richard Vernon's approach to reconciling cosmopolitan political morality with particularized political obligations in his work, Cosmopolitan Regard. It situates his approach in his critical treatment of competing transactional theories of obligation, particularly reciprocity for benefits received, and presents his justification of particularized political obligations towards fellow members of persons’ own state, based on complicity in unique systems of risk exposure. The paper also presents a critical treatment of his theory, and goes on to outline an alternate conception (...)
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  • Justice in Finance: The Normative Case for an International Financial Transaction Tax.Gabriel Wollner - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (4):458-485.
    There has recently been much debate about the idea of levying a tax on particular transactions on international financial markets. Economists have argued about how much revenue such an international financial transaction tax would raise and they disagree about what effects it would have on trade volumes, financial stability, and overall growth. Politicians have argued about the feasibility of introducing such a tax internationally and they disagree on its adequacy as a policy response to the current financial and economic crisis. (...)
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  • Are Liberal Peoples Peaceful?Leif Wenar & Branko Milanovic - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (4):462-486.
  • International Law and Political Philosophy: Uncovering New Linkages.Steven Ratner - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (2):e12564.
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  • Justice and Taxation.Daniel Halliday - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (12):1111-1122.
    This article provides a survey of various topics in which questions about taxation feature alongside questions about justice. It seeks to argue mainly that taxation is a rather fragmentary domain of inquiry about which it is hard to envisage the development of views about what justice requires with respect to tax policy in general. Guided by this idea, the article attempts to highlight some aspects of taxation whose connection with justice has been under-explored by philosophers, as well as to acquaint (...)
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  • What's Special About the State?Helena de Bres - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (2):140-160.
    any of us think that we have duties of distributive justice towards our fellow citizens that we do not have towards foreigners. Is that thought justified? This paper considers the nature of the state's relationship to distributive justice from the perspective of utilitarianism, a theory that is barely represented in contemporary philosophical debates on this question. My strategy is to mount a utilitarian case for state-specific duties of distributive justice that is similar in its basic structure to the one that (...)
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  • Why Outcomes Matter: Reclaiming Distributive Justice.Peter Lindsay - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-23.
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  • The Limits of Background Justice.Thomas Porter Sinclair - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):352-372.
    The argument from background justice is that conformity to Lockean principles of justice in agreements and transactions does not preclude the development of inequalities that undermine the freedom and fairness of those very transactions, and that, therefore, special principles are needed to regulate society's Rawls offers this argument as his for taking the basic structure to be the primary subject of justice. Here I explore the background justice argument and its implications for questions about the scope of distributive justice. As (...)
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  • GMOs and Global Justice: Applying Global Justice Theory to the Case of Genetically Modified Crops and Food. [REVIEW]Kristian Toft - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):223-237.
    Proponents of using genetically modified (GM) crops and food in the developing world often claim that it is unjust not to use GMOs (genetically modified organisms) to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. In reply, the critics of GMOs claim that while GMOs may be useful as a technological means to increase yields and crop quality, stable and efficient institutions are required in order to provide the benefits from GMO technology. In this debate, the GMO proponents tend to rely (...)
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  • Justice, Authority, and the World Order.A. Walton - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):215 – 230.
    This paper defends the pertinence of global justice in the contemporary world. It accepts, for the sake of argument, Nagel's view that matters of justice arise only when political authority is asserted or exercised and, connectedly, his rejection of the cosmopolitan thesis. However, it challenges his conclusion that considerations of justice do not apply beyond the state. It argues that on any plausible account of the relationship between authority and justice international institutions, such as the World Trade Organisation, are now (...)
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  • Equality and the Significance of Coercion.Gabriel Wollner - 2011 - Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (4):363-381.
    Some political philosophers believe that equality emerges as a moral concern where and because people coerce each other. I shall argue that they are wrong. The idea of coercion as a trigger of equality is neither as plausible nor as powerful as it may initially appear. Those who rely on the idea that coercion is among the conditions that give rise to equality as a moral demand face a threefold challenge. They will have to succeed in jointly (a) offering a (...)
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  • Global Justification and Local Legitimation.Sebastiano Maffettone - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (2):239-257.
    This paper distinguishes between the concepts of justification and legitimation with a view to offering a normative standard for global justice compatible with cultural pluralism. According to this distinction, justification is presented as an idealized, substantive and top-down enterprise rooted in the moral and metaphysical substrate of a specific culture. On the other hand, legitimation has a procedural and factual connotation and derives its strength from the success of some culturally independent but historically situated practice (bottom-up approach). Building on this (...)
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  • Contemporary Cosmopolitanism: Some Current Issues.Gillian Brock - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (8):689-698.
    In this article, we survey some current debates among cosmopolitans and their critics. We begin by surveying some distinctions typically drawn among kinds of cosmopolitanisms, before canvassing some of the diverse varieties of cosmopolitan justice, exploring positions on the content of cosmopolitan duties of justice, and a prominent debate between cosmopolitans and defenders of statist accounts of global justice. We then explore some common concerns about cosmopolitanism – such as whether cosmopolitan commitments are necessarily in tension with other affiliations people (...)
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  • Institutional Consequentialism and Global Governance.Attila Tanyi & András Miklós - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):279-297.
    Elsewhere we have responded to the so-called demandingness objection to consequentialism – that consequentialism is excessively demanding and is therefore unacceptable as a moral theory – by introducing the theoretical position we call institutional consequentialism. This is a consequentialist view that, however, requires institutional systems, and not individuals, to follow the consequentialist principle. In this paper, we first introduce and explain the theory of institutional consequentialism and the main reasons that support it. In the remainder of the paper, we turn (...)
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  • Deliberation Beyond Borders: The Public Reason of a Society of Peoples.William Smith - 2011 - Journal of International Political Theory 7 (2):117-139.
    The aim of this article is to contribute to the elaboration of a deliberative approach to global institutional design. A deliberative approach aims to embed processes of mutual reason-giving at the heart of international relations and global decision-making. The theoretical framework that orientates this discussion is the liberal approach to international law developed by John Rawls. It may seem strange to invoke this model: after all, Rawls does not specifically discuss the issue of global institutional design and indeed has been (...)
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  • Fairness to Non-Participants: A Case for a Practice-Independent Egalitarian Baseline.Merten Reglitz - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 20 (4): 466-485.
    Proponents of practice-dependent egalitarianism argue that egalitarian duties and entitlements only apply among participants in morally relevant practices. In this paper, I argue that these views are implausible because they allow for objectionable treatment of non-participants. I show that it is impossible, on the basis of practice-internal considerations alone, to determine the extent to which the pursuit of practices can permissibly limit the opportunities of non-participants. There are opportunities beyond the current holdings of practices to which no one has a (...)
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  • Disaggregated Pluralistic Theories of Global Distributive Justice – a Critique.Julian Culp - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):168-186.
    Pluralistic theories of global distributive justice aim at justifying a plurality of principles for various subglobal contexts of distributive justice. Helena de Bres has recently proposed the class of disaggregated pluralistic theories, according to which we should refrain from defending principles that apply to the shared background conditions of such subglobal contexts. This article argues that if one does not justify how these background conditions should be regulated by principles of a just global basic structure, then the realization of the (...)
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  • No Justice Without Democracy: A Deliberative Approach to the Global Distribution of Wealth.Stefan Rummens - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (5):657-680.
    The debate about global distributive justice is characterized by an often stark opposition between universalistic approaches, advocating an egalitarian global redistribution of wealth (Beitz, Pogge, Barry, Tan), and particularistic positions, aiming to justify a restriction of redistribution to the domestic community (D. Miller, R. Miller, Blake, Nagel, Rawls). I argue that an approach starting from the deliberative model of democracy (Habermas) can overcome this opposition. On the one hand, the increasingly global scope of economic interactions implies that the range of (...)
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  • Transnational Citizenship and the Democratic State: Modes of Membership and Voting Rights.David Owen - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (5):641-663.
    This article addresses two central topics in normative debates on transnational citizenship: the inclusion of resident non-citizens and of non-resident citizens within the demos. Through a critical review of the social membership (Carens, Rubio-Marin) and stakeholder (Baubock) principles, it identifies two problems within these debates. The first is the antinomy of incorporation, namely, the point that there are compelling arguments both for the mandatory naturalization of permanent residents and for making naturalization a voluntary process. The second is the arbitrary demos (...)
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  • The Wto and the Limits of Distributive Justice.Pietro Maffettone - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):243-267.
    In this article I rethink Rawls' conception of international economic justice, with a particular focus on international trade. I ground my normative argument on a different interpretation of the concepts of basic structure and of basic institution. I use the contemporary international trading system to illustrate my normative interpretation. I use the Law of Peoples to discuss the Rawlsian concept of basic structure. I contest Samuel Freeman's interpretation of this concept as one that pertains exclusively to the domestic realm. As (...)
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  • Global Cities, Global Justice?Loren King & Michael Blake - forthcoming - Journal of Global Ethics:1-21.
    The global city is a contested site of economic innovation and cultural production, as well as profound inequalities of wealth and life chances. These cities, and large cities that aspire to ‘global’ status, are often the point of entry for new immigrants. Yet for political theorists (and indeed many scholars of global institutions), these critical sites of global influence and inequality have not been a significant focus of attention. This is curious. Theorists have wrestled with the nature and demands of (...)
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  • Ideals of Egalitarianism and Sufficiency Global Justice.Debra Satz - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (S1):53-71.
  • Rising Powers' Responsibility for Reducing Global Distributive Injustice.Julian Culp - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):274-282.
    Rising powers like India and Brazil have recently been gaining considerable economic and political power. This has led to the emergence of a nascent multipolarity in global affairs. Theorists of global distributive justice, however, continue to focus almost exclusively on the responsibility of the established powers for combating global poverty and neglect whether there is a similar responsibility of rising powers. That focus neglects that great shifts have occurred in the distribution of the economically severely poor over the past three (...)
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  • Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
    Poor working conditions remain a serious problem in supplier facilities in developing countries. While previous research has explored this from the developed buyers’ side, we examine this phenomenon from the perspective of developing countries’ suppliers and subcontractors. Utilizing qualitative data from a major knitwear exporting cluster in India and a stakeholder management lens, we develop a framework that shows how the assumptions of conventional, buyer-driven voluntary governance break down in the dilution of buyer power and in the web of factors (...)
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  • A Normative Foundation for Statism.Patrick Taylor Smith - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  • Global Migratory Potential and the Scope of Justice.R. Child - 2011 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (3):282-300.
    We live in an era of global migratory potential — a time when a vast number of people have the physical capacity to move relatively quickly and easily between states. In this article, I use this fact to motivate a powerful objection to ‘statism’, the view that the egalitarian principles of justice which apply to citizens have no application outside the boundaries of the state. I argue that, in a world characterized by global migratory potential, the supposed contrast between the (...)
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  • The Many, Not the Few: Pluralism About Global Distributive Justice.Helena de Bres - 2012 - Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (3):314-340.
  • Comparative Assessments of Justice, Political Feasibility, and Ideal Theory.Pablo Gilabert - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):39-56.
    What should our theorizing about social justice aim at? Many political philosophers think that a crucial goal is to identify a perfectly just society. Amartya Sen disagrees. In The Idea of Justice, he argues that the proper goal of an inquiry about justice is to undertake comparative assessments of feasible social scenarios in order to identify reforms that involve justice-enhancement, or injustice-reduction, even if the results fall short of perfect justice. Sen calls this the “comparative approach” to the theory of (...)
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  • Fairness in International Economic Cooperation: Moving Beyond Rawls’s Duty of Assistance.Sylvie Loriaux - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (1):19-39.
    In this paper, I will argue that Rawls?s duty of assistance offers an incomplete picture of our international social and economic responsibilities. I will start by presenting the two main interpretations of the ?Rawlsian circumstances of egalitarian distributive justice? ? the first requiring the existence of a ?certain kind? of cooperation, the second the existence of a ?certain kind? of interaction with the will ? and then show that none of them rules out the applicability of international principles of egalitarian (...)
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  • The Distributive Justice of a Global Basic Structure: A Category Mistake?A. Follesdal - 2011 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (1):46-65.
  • Rigorist Cosmopolitanism.Shmuel Nili - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):260-287.
    What counts as global ‘harm’? This article explores this question through critical engagement with Thomas Pogge’s conception of negative duties not to harm. My purpose here is to show that while Pogge is right to orient global moral claims around negative duties not to harm, he is mistaken in departing from the standard understanding of these duties. Pogge ties negative duties to global institutions, but I argue that truly negative duties cannot apply to such institutions. In order to retain the (...)
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  • Global Justice, Reciprocity, and the State.Andrea Sangiovanni - 2007 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (1):3–39.
  • Realism, Moralism, Models and Institutions.C. Bertram - 2016 - Journal of International Political Theory 12 (2):185-199.
  • Justice and International Trade.de Bres Helena - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):570-579.
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  • The Liberal Constitution and Foreign Affairs.Fernando R. Tesón - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):115-149.
    Scholars have debated the meaning of the foreign-relations clauses in the U.S. Constitution. This essay attempts to outline the foreign-relations clauses that an ideal constitution should have. A liberal constitution must enable the government to implement a morally defensible foreign policy. The first priority is the defense of liberty. The constitution must allow the government to effectively defend persons, territory, and liberal institutions themselves. The liberal government should also contribute to the advancement of global freedom, subject to a number of (...)
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  • Risse on Justice in Trade.Helena de Bres - 2014 - Ethics and International Affairs 28 (4):489-499.
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