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  1. Explanation and Essence in Posterior Analytics II 16-17.Breno Andrade Zuppolini - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:229-264.
    In Posterior Analytics II 16-17, Aristotle seems to claim that there cannot be more than one explanans of the same scientific explanandum. However, this seems to be true only for “primary-universal” demonstrations, in which the major term belongs to the minor “in itself” and the middle term is coextensive with the extremes. If so, several explananda we would like to admit as truly scientific would be out of the scope of an Aristotelian science. The secondary literature has identified a second (...)
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  • Aristotle on Nous of Simples.Travis Butler & Eric Rubenstein - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):327 - 353.
    In so many of his epistemological writings, Aristotle defends a sensible flavor of gradualism about our cognitive capacities: we start with the partial grasps afforded by what is better known to us, and if things go well, we end up with understandings of those objects better known by nature. The picture is of a step-wise process, rather than a transforming moment of illumination.
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  • ASPECTOS FORMAIS E ONTOLÓGICOS DA FILOSOFIA DA CIÊNCIA DE ARISTÓTELES.Breno Andrade Zuppolini - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Campinas
    Aristotle's theory of demonstration, developed in the Posterior Analytics, is not restricted to determining the formal requirements for formulating probative arguments that establish properly the results of scientific investigation. To the probative aspect of demonstration it shall be added its primarily explanatory character, orientated by theses of strong ontological and metaphysical content and involving notions like substance, essence and causation. We shall analyze the relation between those two ranges of Aristotle's philosophy of science and investigate how the formal features of (...)
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  • Ontological Underpinnings of Aristotle's Philosophy of Science.Breno A. Zuppolini - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Campinas, Brazil
  • Aristotle’s Explanationist Epistemology of Essence.Christopher Hauser - 2019 - Metaphysics 2 (1):26-39.
    Essentialists claim that at least some individuals or kinds have essences. This raises an important but little-discussed question: how do we come to know what the essence of something is? This paper examines Aristotle’s answer to this question. One influential interpretation (viz., the Explanationist Interpretation) is carefully expounded, criticized, and then refined. Particular attention is given to what Aristotle says about this issue in DA I.1, APo II.2, and APo II.8. It is argued that the epistemological claim put forward in (...)
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  • Philosophy of Biology and Metaphysics: Reconsidering the Aristotelian Approach.Federica Bocchi - 2016 - Dissertation, Università Degli Studi di Parma
  • On What Grounds What.Jonathan Schaffer - 2009 - In David Manley, David J. Chalmers & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press. pp. 347-383.
    On the now dominant Quinean view, metaphysics is about what there is. Metaphysics so conceived is concerned with such questions as whether properties exist, whether meanings exist, and whether numbers exist. I will argue for the revival of a more traditional Aristotelian view, on which metaphysics is about what grounds what. Metaphysics so revived does not bother asking whether properties, meanings, and numbers exist (of course they do!) The question is whether or not they are fundamental.
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  • Definition and Essence in Metaphysics Vii 4.Lucas Angioni - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):75-100.
    This paper discusses Aristotle’s notions of essence and definition as they are developed in Metaphysics Z-4, a chapter in which Aristotle seems to hesitate or even to contradict himself about criteria for determining what an essence is. This paper offers a full discussion of Aristotle’s argument and try to show that there is no inconsistency nor hesitation in Aristotle’s approach. Aristotle begins with a more general account of essence and definitions, which is based on merely logical-epistemic requirements, but at 1030a2-17 (...)
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  • On the “Perceptible Bodies” at De Generatione Et Corruptione II.1.Timothy J. Crowley - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:1-26.
    Near the beginning of _De Gen. et Cor. _II.1, Aristotle claims that the generation and corruption of all naturally constituted substances are “not without the perceptible bodies”. It is not clear what he intends by this. In this paper I offer a new interpretation of this assertion. I argue that the assumption behind the usual reading, namely, that these “perceptible bodies” ought to be distinguished from the naturally constituted substances, is flawed, and that the assertion is best understood as a (...)
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  • Explanation and Essence in Posterior Analytics II 16-17.Breno Andrade Zuppolini - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:229-264.
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  • The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Ömer Aygün - 2017 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
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  • Harmonizing Leibniz’s Ontology.Andrew D. H. Stumpf - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (3):467-483.
    I propose a novel compatibilist interpretation of Leibniz’s mature views concerning what is metaphysically basic. Drawing on a compatibilist reading of Aristotle on primary substance in the Categories and Metaphysics Z, I argue that Leibniz is working with two complementary ways of being metaphysically basic—one applying to immaterial monads, the other to corporeal substances. Although corporeal substances derive their status as basic from their dominant monads, they are nevertheless fully real, unified, and genuinely capable of acting. This perspective respects Leibniz’s (...)
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  • The Necessity of Metaphysics.Tuomas E. Tahko - 2008 - Dissertation, Durham University
    The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate that metaphysics is a necessary discipline -- necessary in the sense that all areas of philosophy, all areas of science, and in fact any type of rational activity at all would be impossible without a metaphysical background or metaphysical presuppositions. Because of the extremely strong nature of this claim, it is not possible to put forward a very simple argument, although I will attempt to construct one. A crucial issue here is what (...)
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  • La historia de la filosofía como examen crítico de la filosofía precedente: las objeciones de Aristóteles a la causalidad de las Ideas.Silvana Gabriela di Camilo - 2013 - Cuadernos de Filosofía 60:61-74.
    Frente a quienes sostienen una incompatibilidad entre historia de la filosofía y filosofía, en cuanto plantean una disyuntiva entre una práctica descriptiva y una argumentativa, en este trabajo nos proponemos mostrar, examinando la labor histórico-filosófica de Aris- tóteles, que esa disyuntiva no es excluyente. Para ello, en primer lugar, examinaremos algunos pasajes de su obra en los que ofrece indicaciones metodológicas que permiten comprender la doble función que cumplen las exposiciones críticas de los filósofos precedentes en la constitución misma de (...)
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  • Essence and Cause: Making Something Be What It Is.Riin Sirkel - 2018 - Discipline Filosofiche 28 (1):89-112.
    Aristotle frequently describes essence as a “cause” or “explanation”, thus ascribing to essence some sort of causal or explanatory role. This explanatory role is often explicated by scholars in terms of essence “making the thing be what it is” or “making it the very thing that it is”. I argue that this is problematic, at least on the assumption that “making” expresses an explanatory relation, since it violates certain formal features of explanation. I then consider whether Aristotle is vulnerable to (...)
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  • Things Are the Same as Their “Essences”? Notes on Aristotle’s Metaphysics Z-6.Lucas Angioni - 2012 - Analytica (Rio) 16 (1):37-66.
    I discuss Aristotle’s views in Metaphysics VII-6 (Z-6) on the issue whether each thing is the same as its essence. I propose a deflationary interpretation according to which Z-6 develops a “logical approach” (logikos) in which “sameness” amounts only to coextensiveness between definiendum and definiens with no attention to more specific issues about ontological and explanatory features of definitions.
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  • Ontological Separation in Aristotle’s Metaphysics.Emily Katz - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (1):26-68.
    _ Source: _Volume 62, Issue 1, pp 26 - 68 Ontological separation plays a key role in Aristotle’s metaphysical project: substances alone are ontologically χωριστόν. The standard view identifies Aristotelian ontological separation with ontological independence, so that ontological separation is a non-symmetric relation. I argue that there is strong textual evidence that Aristotle employs an asymmetric notion of separation in the _Metaphysics_—one that involves the dependence of other entities on the independent entity. I argue that this notion allows Aristotle to (...)
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  • Alteration and Persistence: Form and Matter in the Physics and Gen. Et Corr.S. Marc Cohen - 2012 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oup Usa. pp. 205.
    Aristotle takes up the topic of change (or coming-to-be and ceasing-to-be) in both the Physics and De Generatione et Corruptione. He distinguishes between simple coming-to-be (substantial change), as when something comes into existence, and qualified coming-to-be (accidental change), as when an already existing thing alters, or moves, or changes in some other way. But he also maintains a persistence principle: that in every change, whether simple or qualified, there is something that persists throughout the change. I examine the question of (...)
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  • The Underlying Argument of Aristotle’s Metaphysics Z.3.Jerry Green - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (4):321-342.
    This paper argues that Aristotle’s Metaphysics Z.3 deploys a reductio against the claim that ‘substances underlie by being the subjects of predication’, in order to demonstrate the need for a new explanation of how substances underlie. Z.13 and H.1 corroborate this reading: both allude to an argument originally contained in Z.3, but now lost from our text, that form, matter and compound ‘underlie’ in different ways. This helps explain some of Z’s peculiarities—and it avoids committing Aristotle to self-contradiction about whether (...)
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  • Sustancia E Individuación En El Organon de Aristóteles.Fabián Mié - 2013 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 39 (2):151-185.
    Me propongo explicar que los términos sustanciales usados individuadoramente constituyen la expresión lingüística que fija la referencia a un objeto en el Organon de Aristóteles, y mostrar que esa expresión opera allí como principium individuationis. El artículo desarrolla dos tesis principales: Es legítimo adjudicar a Aristóteles una teoría descriptiva de la referencia, en la cual las propiedades esenciales incluidas en la definición constituyen condiciones suficientes para referir, dado un contexto donde los términos sustanciales se usan para individuar. Los individuos sustanciales (...)
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  • El argumento de" Lo Uno sobre lo múltiple" en el Tratado sobre las Ideas de Aristóteles.Silvana Gabriela Di Camillo - 2010 - Synthesis (la Plata) 17:47-63.
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  • Colloquium 5: Aristotle on the Form and Definition of a Human Being: Definitions and Their Parts in Metaphysics Ζ 10 and 11. [REVIEW]Devereux Daniel - 2011 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):167-210.
  • Commentary on Lewis.Mary Louise Gill - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):129-136.
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  • Commentary on Ferejohn.John J. Cleary - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):59-66.
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  • Unity, Plurality, and Hylomorphic Composition in Aristotle's Metaphysics.Anne Siebels Peterson - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):1-13.
    How should we understand the relationship, for Aristotle, between matter, form, and hylomorphic composite? Are matter and form distinct from each other, so that each hylomorphic unity harbours a plurality within it, or would such a plurality undermine the unity of the composite? A recent strand of argument in both Aristotelian and contemporary literature on hylomorphism has concluded that no genuine unity can be composed of a plurality. I will argue that the objection motivating this conclusion falls away as improperly (...)
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  • De Generatione Et Corruptione 2.3: Does Aristotle Identify The Contraries As Elements?Timothy J. Crowley - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):161-182.
    It might seem quite commonplace to say that Aristotle identifies fire, air, water and earth as the στοιχεῖα, or ‘elements’ – or, to be more precise, as the elements of bodies that are subject to generation and corruption. Yet there is a tradition of interpretation, already evident in the work of the sixth-century commentator John Philoponus and widespread, indeed prevalent, today, according to which Aristotle does not really believe that fire, air, water and earth are truly elemental. The basic premise (...)
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  • Totalizing Identities: The Ambiguous Legacy of Aristotle and Hegel After Auschwitz.Christopher Philip Long - 2003 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (2):209-240.