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  1. Cultural Theory as Individualistic Ideology: Rejoinder to Ellis.Jeffrey Friedman - 1993 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 7 (1):129-158.
    How can one examine the sources of people's beliefs, tastes, and preferences without falling into the self‐refuting determinism that has so often characterized the most systematic theory of preferences, Marxism? Cultural Theory's attempt to do so posits five anthropologically derived, competing “ways of life"— individualism, egalitarianism, hierarchism, fatalism, and withdrawal from social life—that are intended to apply to all forms of culture and, therefore, to provide a universal framework for explaining people's preferential biases. Richard Ellis's defense of Cultural Theory, however, (...)
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  • Luck.Richard A. Epstein - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (1):17.
    John Donne's song was hardly written in the tradition of political philosophy, but it has a good deal to say about the theme of luck, both good and bad, which I want to address. There is no doubt but that bad luck has bad consequences for the persons who suffer from it. If there were a costless way in which the consequences of bad luck could be spread across everyone in society at large, without increasing the risk of its occurrence, (...)
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  • How Interesting is the “Boring Problem” for Luck Egalitarianism?Gerald Lang - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):698-722.
    Imagine a two-person distributive case in which Ernest's choices yield X and Bertie's choices yield X + Y, producing an income gap between them of Y. Neither Ernest nor Bertie is responsible for this gap of Y, since neither of them has any control over what the other agent chooses. This is what Susan Hurley calls the “Boring Problem” for luck egalitarianism. Contrary to Hurley's relatively dismissive treatment of it, it is contended that the Boring Problem poses a deep problem (...)
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  • Rawls and the Colledive Ownership of Natural Abilities.Andrew Kernohan - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):19-28.
    In two passages of A Theory of Justice Rawls suggests that, as a consequence of his egalitarian theory, the natural talents of persons are common property.We see then that the difference principle represents, in effect, an agreement to regard the distribution of natural talents as a common asset and to share in the benefits of this distribution whatever it turns out to be. The two principles are equivalent, as I have remarked, to an undertaking to regard the distribution of natural (...)
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  • G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality.Tom G. Palmer - 1998 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 12 (3):225-251.
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
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  • The Libertarian Idea.Grant Brown - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):417-447.
  • A Challenge to Neo-Lockeanism.John E. Roemer - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):697 - 710.
    The neo-Lockean justification of the highly unequal distribution of income in capitalist societies is based upon two key premises: that people are the rightful owners of their labor and talents, and that the external world was, in the state of nature, unowned, and therefore up for grabs by people, who could rightfully appropriate parts of it subject to a ‘Lockean proviso.’ The argument is presented by Nozick. Counter-proposals to Nozick’s, for the most part, have either denied the premise that people (...)
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  • Liberalism and Communitarianism.Will Kymlicka - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):181 - 203.
    It is a commonplace amongst communitarians, socialists and feminists alike that liberalism is to be rejected for its excessive ‘individualism’ or ‘atomism,’ for ignoring the manifest ways in which we are ‘embedded’ or ‘situated’ in various social roles and communal relationships. The effect of these theoretical flaws is that liberalism, in a misguided attempt to protect and promote the dignity and autonomy of the individual, has undermined the associations and communities which alone can nurture human flourishing.My plan is to examine (...)
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  • Critical Notice.Grant Brown - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):417-447.
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  • Equality.David Miller - 1989 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 26:77-98.
    It is a distinctive and unprecedented feature of modern societies that the idea of equality should hold a central place in their political thinking. I want to begin my enquiry by considering why this should be and what its significance is. For if there is indeed an important sense in which egalitarianism is written in to contemporary conditions of life, it makes no sense to think of oneself as taking a stand for or against equality. Now to say this is (...)
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  • A Public Ownership Resolution of the Tragedy of the Commons*: JOHN E. ROEMER.John E. Roemer - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (2):74-92.
    Imagine a society of fisherfolk, who, in the state of nature, fish on a lake of finite size. Fishing on the lake is characterized by decreasing returns to scale in labor, because the lake's finite size imply that each successive hour of fishing labor is less effective than the previous one, as the remaining fish become less dense in the lake. In the state of nature, the lake is commonly owned: each fishes as much as he pleases, and, we might (...)
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  • Property Rights in Persons: RICHARD J. ARNESON.Richard J. Arneson - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):201-230.
    In contemporary market societies, the laws do not place individuals under enforceable obligations to aid others. Perhaps the most striking exception to this broad generalization is the practice of conscription of able-bodied males into military service, particularly in time of war. Another notable exception is the legal enforcement in some contemporary societies of “Good Samaritan” obligations — obligations to provide temporary aid to victims of emergencies, such as car accident victims. The obligation applies to those who are in the immediate (...)
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  • Self‐Ownership and Equality: A Lockean Reconciliation.Michael Otsuka - 1998 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (1):65-92.
    I thank the members of the Law and Philosophy Discussion Group in Los Angeles and those who attended a talk sponsored by the philosophy department at New York University, where I presented earlier versions of this paper. I would also like to thank G. A. Cohen, Stephen Munzer, Seana Shiffrin, Peter Vallentyne, Andrew Williams, and the editors of Philosophy & Public Affairs, who read and provided written commentary on earlier drafts.
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  • Egalitarianism, Responsibility, and Information: John E. Roemer.John E. Roemer - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (2):215-244.
    Radical and liberal theories of egalitarianism are distinguished, in large part, by the differing degrees to which they hold people responsible for their own well-being. The most liberal or individualistic theory calls for equality of opportunity. Once such “starting gate equality,” as Dworkin calls it, is guaranteed, then any final outcome is justified, provided certain rules, such as voluntary trading, are observed. At the other pole, the most radical egalitarianism calls for equality of welfare. In between these two extremes are (...)
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  • Capitalism and Self-Ownership.Andrew Kernohan - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (1):60.
    From the standpoint of libertarian ideology, capitalism is a form of liberation. In contrast to the slave, whose productive powers are wholly owned by his master, and the serf, whose productive powers are partially owned by his lord, the worker under capitalism is presented as possessing the fullest possible self-ownership. That capitalism fosters self-ownership is a false and stultifying myth. Exposing its errors from within capitalism's own conceptual framework requires a careful analysis of the concept of a person's “ownership” bodh (...)
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  • Capitalist Persons.Andrew Levine - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (1):39.
    In what follows, “persons” are ideal-typical concepts of human beings, deployed expressly or supposed implicitly in particular theoretical contexts. Thus, the person of Kantian moral philosophy is a pure bearer of moral predicates, bereft of all properties that empirically distinguish human beings from one another: properties that, in Kant's view, are irrelevant to moral deliberation. No man or woman, actual or possible, could be so starkly featureless. But Kant's aim was not to describe human beings in actual or possible deliberations, (...)
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  • Justice, Self-Ownership, and Natural Assets.Michael Gorr - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):267-291.
    A question that has recently attracted considerable attention is this: What is the nature and significance of the normative relationship a person bears to herself ? On one view, it is held that persons are self-owners : as Locke put it in one of the more famous passages in the Second Treatise : [E]very man has a property in his own person : this no body has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of (...)
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  • Markets, Choice and Agency.Timothy Fowler - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):347-361.
    John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness introduces several powerful arguments in favour of a novel and surprising thesis: the best way to realize Rawls’s principles of justice is a free market society, rather than the arrangements that Rawls himself believed would best promote justice. In this paper, I adduce three arguments against Tomasi. First, I suggest that his view rests on a faulty understanding of what constitutes conventional property rights. Second, I argue that many market solutions generate choices which are not (...)
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  • Parental Autonomy.John Bigelow, John Campbell, Susan M. Dodds, Robert Pargetter, Elizabeth W. Prior & Robert Young - 1988 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (2):183-196.
  • Solidarity and Social Rights.Margaret Kohn - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-15.
  • An Egalitarian Law of Peoples.Thomas W. Pogge - 1994 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (3):195-224.
  • Historical Materialism and More.William H. Shaw - 1989 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):437 – 453.