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  1. I just need an opiate refill to get me through the weekend.Eric Yan & Dennis John Kuo - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):219-224.
    In this article, we discuss the ethical dimensions for the prescribing behaviours of opioids for a chronic pain patient, a scenario commonly witnessed by many physicians. The opioid epidemic in the USA and Canada is well known, existing since the late 1990s, and individuals are suffering and dying as a result of the easy availability of prescription opioids. More recently, this problem has been seen outside of North America affecting individuals at similar rates in Australia and Europe. We argue that (...)
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  • Addiction, responsibility and moral psychology.A. M. Viens - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):17 – 19.
    The author comments on several articles on addiction. Recent developments in neuroscience suggest that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in the cognitive control of voluntary behavior. The author differs on the observations that addicts either act on desires that are not conducive to rational action. The author also states that addiction seems to be a prime manifestation of akrasia, in which one fails to be motivated to act in accordance with what one judges ought to be done. Accession Number: 24077920; (...)
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  • Our Life Depends on This Drug: Competence, Inequity, and Voluntary Consent in Clinical Trials on Supervised Injectable Opioid Assisted Treatment.Daniel Steel, Kirsten Marchand & Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):32-40.
    Supervised injectable opioid assisted treament prescribes injectable opioids to individuals for whom other forms of addiction treatment have been ineffective. In this article, we examine arguments that opioid-dependent people should be assumed incompetent to voluntarily consent to clinical research on siOAT unless proven otherwise. We agree that concerns about competence and voluntary consent deserve careful attention in this context. But we oppose framing the issue solely as a matter of the competence of opioid-dependent people and emphasize that it should be (...)
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  • Decision-making capacity for research participation among addicted people: a cross-sectional study.Inés Morán-Sánchez, Aurelio Luna, Maria Sánchez-Muñoz, Beatriz Aguilera-Alcaraz & Maria D. Pérez-Cárceles - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundInformed consent is a key element of ethical clinical research. Addicted population may be at risk for impaired consent capacity. However, very little research has focused on their comprehension of consent forms. The aim of this study is to assess the capacity of addicted individuals to provide consent to research.Methods53 subjects with DSM-5 diagnoses of a Substance Use Disorder and 50 non psychiatric comparison subjects participated in the survey from December 2014 to March 2015. This cross-sectional study was carried out (...)
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  • Risk Environments and the Ethics of Reducing Drug-Related Harms.Tim Rhodes, Magdalena Harris, A. M. Viens & C. R. McGowan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):46-48.
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  • Addiction and autonomy: Can addicted people consent to the prescription of their drug of addiction?Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu - 2005 - Bioethics 20 (1):1–15.
    It is often claimed that the autonomy of heroin addicts is compromised when they are choosing between taking their drug of addiction and abstaining. This is the basis of claims that they are incompetent to give consent to be prescribed heroin. We reject these claims on a number of empirical and theoretical grounds. First we argue that addicts are likely to be sober, and thus capable of rational thought, when approaching researchers to participate in research. We reject behavioural evidence purported (...)
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  • The social implications of neurobiological explanations of resistible compulsions.Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):15 – 17.
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors: Carter, Adrian 1; Email Address: [email protected] Hall, Wayne 1; Affiliations: (...)
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  • Control and Responsibility in Addicted Individuals: What do Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians Think?Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Stephanie Bell, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall - 2013 - Neuroethics 7 (2):205-214.
    Impaired control over drug use is a defining characteristic of addiction in the major diagnostic systems. However there is significant debate about the extent of this impairment. This qualitative study examines the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians believe that addicted individuals have control over their drug use and are responsible for their behaviour. One hour semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2009 and 2010 with 31 Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females and 21 males; 16 with (...)
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  • Good intentions and dangerous assumptions: Research ethics committees and illicit drug use research.Kirsten Bell & Amy Salmon - 2012 - Research Ethics 8 (4):191-199.
    Illicit drug users are frequently identified as a ‘vulnerable population’ requiring ‘special protection’ and ‘additional safeguards’ in research. However, without specific guidance on how to enact these special protections and safeguards, research ethics committee (REC) members sometimes fall back on untested assumptions about the ethics of illicit drug use research. In light of growing calls for ‘evidence-based research ethics’, this commentary examines three common assumptions amongst REC members about what constitutes ethical research with drug users, and whether such assumptions are (...)
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  • Addiction, neuroscience and ethics.Wayne Hall - 2003 - Addiction 98 (7):867-870.
    If one believes that the brain is, in some as yet unspecified way, the organ of mind and behaviour, then all human behaviour has a neurobiological basis. Neuroscience research over the past several decades has provided more specific reasons for believing that many addictive phenomena have a neurobiological basis. The major psychoactive drugs of dependence have been shown to act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain (Nutt 1997; Koob 2000); common neurochemical mechanisms underlie many of the rewarding effects of these (...)
     
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