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  1. Zeno’s Paradoxes and the Viscous Friction Force.Leonardo Sioufi Fagundes dos Santos - 2022 - Foundations of Physics 52 (3):1-9.
    In this paper, we connected Zeno’s paradoxes and motions with the viscous friction force \. For the progressive version of the dichotomy paradox, if the body speed is constant, the sequences of positions and instants are infinite, but the series of distances and time variations converge to finite values. However, when the body moves with force \, the series of time variations becomes infinite. In this case, the body crosses infinite points, approximating to a final position forever, as the progressive (...)
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  • Aristotle’s Solution to Zeno’s Arrow Paradox and its Implications.John M. Pemberton - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy Today 4 (1):73-95.
    Aristotle’s solution to Zeno’s arrow paradox differs markedly from the so called at-at solution championed by Russell, which has become the orthodox view in contemporary philosophy. The latter supposes that motion consists in simply being at different places at different times. It can boast parsimony because it eliminates velocity from the ontology. Aristotle, by contrast, solves the paradox by denying that the flight of the arrow is composed of instants; rather, on my reading, he holds that the flight is a (...)
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  • Zeno Beach.Jacob Rosen - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):467-500.
    On Zeno Beach there are infinitely many grains of sand, each half the size of the last. Supposing Aristotle denied the possibility of Zeno Beach, did he have a good argument for the denial? Three arguments, each of ancient origin, are examined: the beach would be infinitely large; the beach would be impossible to walk across; the beach would contain a part equal to the whole, whereas parts must be lesser. It is attempted to show that none of these arguments (...)
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  • Zeno of Elea.John Palmer - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.