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Jane Collier & Rafael Esteban (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Commitment.

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  1.  11
    Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Leadership, and Trust Propensity: A Multi-Experience Model of Perceived Ethical Climate.S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Bradley J. Alge & Christine L. Jackson - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  2.  2
    Ethics Versus Outcomes: Managerial Responses to Incentive-Driven and Goal-Induced Employee Behavior.M. Fleischman Gary, N. Johnson Eric, B. Walker Kenton & R. Valentine Sean - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Management plays an important role in reinforcing ethics in organizations. To support this aim, managers must use incentive and goal programs in ethical ways. This study examines experimentally the potential ethical costs associated with incentive-driven and goal-induced employee behavior from a managerial perspective. In a quasi-experimental setting, 243 MBA students with significant professional work experience evaluated a hypothetical employee’s ethical behavior under incentive pay systems modeled on a business case. In the role of the employee’s manager, participants evaluated the ethicality (...)
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  3.  3
    Microfoundations of Partnerships: Exploring the Role of Employees in Trickle Effects.Ans Kolk, Marlene Vock & Willemijn van Dolen - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  4.  10
    Unpacking the Drivers of Corporate Social Performance: A Multilevel, Multistakeholder, and Multimethod Analysis.Marc Orlitzky, Céline Louche, Jean-Pascal Gond & Wendy Chapple - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  5.  8
    Business Cases and Corporate Engagement with Sustainability: Differentiating Ethical Motivations.Stefan Schaltegger & Roger Burritt - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  6.  10
    Social Media Policies: Implications for Contemporary Notions of Corporate Social Responsibility.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Etter, Scott Banghart & DaJung Woo - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  7.  4
    Ethical Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility in China: A Multilevel Study of Their Effects on Trust and Organizational Citizenship Behavior.Louise Tourigny, Jian Han, Vishwanath V. Baba & Polly Pan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    Using multisource data and multilevel analysis, we propose that the ethical stance of supervisors influences subordinates’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility which in turn influences subordinates’ trust in the organization resulting in their taking increased personal social responsibility and engagement in organizational citizenship behaviors oriented toward both the organization and other individuals. Using a multilevel model, we assessed the extent to which ethical leadership and CSR at the work unit level impacts subordinates’ behaviors mediated by organizational trust at the individual (...)
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  8.  18
    Code of Ethics: A Stratified Vehicle for Compliance.Jennifer Adelstein & Stewart Clegg - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):53-66.
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  9.  3
    How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective From the Group Engagement Model.Imran Hameed, Zahid Riaz, Ghulam A. Arain & Omer Farooq - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  10.  5
    Linking Corporate Policy and Supervisory Support with Environmental Citizenship Behaviors: The Role of Employee Environmental Beliefs and Commitment.Nicolas Raineri & Pascal Paillé - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):129-148.
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  11.  3
    Sustainability Reporting and Corporate Identity: Action Research Evidence in an Italian Retailing Cooperative.Massimo Battaglia, Lara Bianchi, Marco Frey & Emilio Passetti - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):52-72.
    Cooperatives are facing the challenge to be competitive in the market, without losing their traditional values of mutuality and democracy. To do that, they need to re-construct open and participative dialogue with their employees and members based on more democratic forms of communication and engagement. From this point of view, the measurement and communication of sustainability aspects may allow a dialogue to be mobilized with shareholders and stakeholders without losing the attention on competitive factors. Based on these premises, the article (...)
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  12.  5
    The Impact of Human Resource Management Practices and Corporate Sustainability on Organizational Ethical Climates: An Employee Perspective. [REVIEW]M. Guerci, Giovanni Radaelli, Elena Siletti, Stefano Cirella & A. B. Rami Shani - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-18.
    The increasing challenges faced by organizations have led to numerous studies examining human resource management (HRM) practices, organizational ethical climates and sustainability. Despite this, little has been done to explore the possible relationships between these three topics. This study, based on a probabilistic sample of 6,000 employees from six European countries, analyses how HRM practices with the aim of developing organizational ethics influence the benevolent, principled and egoistic ethical climates that exist within organizations, while also investigating the possible moderating role (...)
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  13.  12
    Exploring Human Resource Management Roles in Corporate Social Responsibility: The CSR‐HRM Co‐Creation Model.Dima R. Jamali, Ali M. El Dirani & Ian A. Harwood - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (2):125-143.
    Formulating and translating corporate social responsibility strategy into actual managerial practices and outcome values remain ongoing challenges for many organizations. This paper argues that the human resource management function can potentially play an important role in supporting organizations to address this challenge. We argue that HRM could provide an interesting and dynamic support to CSR strategy design as well as implementation and delivery. Drawing on a systematic review of relevant strategic CSR and HRM literatures, this paper highlights the important interfaces (...)
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  14.  18
    Exploring Employee Engagement with Social Responsibility: A Social Exchange Perspective on Organisational Participation.R. E. Slack, S. Corlett & R. Morris - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):537-548.
    Corporate social responsibility is a recognised and common part of business activity. Some of the regularly cited motives behind CSR are employee morale, recruitment and retention, with employees acknowledged as a key organisational stakeholder. Despite the significance of employees in relation to CSR, relatively few studies have examined their engagement with CSR and the impediments relevant to this engagement. This exploratory case study-based research addresses this paucity of attention, drawing on one to one interviews and observation in a large UK (...)
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  15.  10
    When Corporate Social Responsibility Increases Performance: Exploring the Role of Intrinsic and Extrinsic CSR Attribution.Joana Story & Pedro Neves - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (2):111-124.
    This study investigates whether employees attribute different motives to their organization's corporate social responsibility efforts and if these motives influence employee performance. Specifically, we investigate whether employees could distinguish between intrinsic and extrinsic CSR motives by surveying 229 employee–supervisor dyads from various industries , and the impact of these perceptions on in-role and extra-role performance of subordinates. We found that employee task performance increases when employees attribute both intrinsic and extrinsic motives for CSR. Moreover, when employees perceive that their organization (...)
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  16.  9
    Beyond the CEO: Diffusing Corporate Social Responsibility Throughout the Organization Through Social Networks.Kathryn J. L. Jacobson, Jacqueline N. Hood & Harry J. Van Buren - 2014 - Business and Society Review 119 (3):337-358.
    Chief Executive Officers and other organizational leaders can affect how corporate social responsibility initiatives are perceived in their organizations. However, in order to be successful with regard to promoting CSR, leaders need to have strong network competencies and to move beyond charismatic leadership. In this paper we offer a critique of charismatic leadership as it relates to CSR, posit that the intellectual stimulation brought about by transformational leadership is more important in this regard, propose that internal and networking is a (...)
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  17.  15
    Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of external stakeholders.” (Banerjee, Crit Sociol (...)
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  18.  6
    Responsible Management, Incentive Systems, and Productivity.Ivan Hilliard - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):365-377.
    A disconnect remains between theories about responsible management and application in real-life organizations. Part of the reason is due to the complexity and holistic nature of the field, and the fact that many of the benefits of aligning business objectives with changing societal conditions are of an intangible nature. Human resource management is an increasingly important part of the field with benefits including talent retention, higher levels of motivation, and improvements in organizational cohesion. This paper sets out an experiment run (...)
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  19.  4
    Strategic Direction of Corporate Community Involvement.Gordon Liu, Teck-Yong Eng & Wai-Wai Ko - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):469-487.
    Previous research on corporate community involvement (CCI) initiatives indicates that such behaviour is critical for building neighbourhood relationships and extending corporate influence in the community, but there is little theoretical work that provides a clear picture of managing the nature of the initiatives from different stakeholder management approaches. Drawing from theoretical insights of stakeholder theory and the concept of social capital, this article proposes nine strategic directions for CCI initiatives, and concludes by discussing the management implications of the proposed strategic (...)
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  20.  4
    Giving as Good as They Get? Organization and Employee Expectations of Ethical Business Practice.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (1):47-70.
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  21.  16
    Corporate Social Responsibility as a Vehicle to Reveal the Corporate Identity: A Study Focused on the Websites of Spanish Financial Entities. [REVIEW]Rafael Bravo, Jorge Matute & José M. Pina - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):129-146.
    This study explores the relevance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an element of the corporate identity of Spanish financial institutions. Specifically, it aims to analyze the CSR actions developed by financial entities through the analysis of all the available information disclosed in their websites. A content analysis applied to 82 banking institutions, followed by different quantitative analyses, reveals the multidimensionality of CSR. Findings show that, while the number of entities institutionalizing CSR values as core elements of their identities is (...)
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  22.  7
    The Internal Significance of Codes of Conduct in Retail Companies.Magnus Frostenson, Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (3):263-275.
    This paper focuses on the significance of codes of conduct (CoCs) in the internal work context of two retail companies. A stepwise approach is used. First, the paper identifies in what way employees use and refer to CoCs internally. Second, the function and relevance of CoCs inside the two companies are identified. Third, the paper explains why CoCs tend to function in the identified ways. In both cases, the CoCs are clearly decoupled in the sense that they do not concern (...)
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  23.  18
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Team Performance: The Mediating Role of Team Efficacy and Team Self-Esteem. [REVIEW]Chieh-Peng Lin, Yehuda Baruch & Wei-Chi Shih - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):167-180.
    This study examines the influence of three components of corporate social responsibility on team performance. In the proposed model of this study, team performance is indirectly affected by three dimensions of perceived corporate citizenship (i.e., economic, legal, and ethical citizenship) via the mediation of team efficacy and team self-esteem. Surveying members of 172 teams confirms most of our hypothesized effects. Our results show that economic citizenship influences team performance via the mediation of both team efficacy and team self-esteem. However, legal (...)
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  24.  20
    To Thine Own Self Be True? Employees' Judgments of the Authenticity of Their Organization's Corporate Social Responsibility Program.Lindsay McShane & Peggy Cunningham - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):81-100.
    Despite recognizing the importance of developing authentic corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, noticeably absent from the literature is consideration for how employees distinguish between authentic and inauthentic CSR programs. This is somewhat surprising given that employees are essentially the face of their organization and are largely expected to act as ambassadors for the organization’s CSR program (Collier and Esteban in Bus Ethics 16:19–33, 2007 ). The current research, by conducting depth interviews with employees, builds a better understanding of how employees (...)
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  25.  48
    Corporate Social Responsibility as a Dynamic Internal Organizational Process: A Case Study.Sharon C. Bolton, Rebecca Chung-hee Kim & Kevin D. O’Gorman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):61-74.
    This article tracks Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as an emergent organizational process that places the employee at its center. Predominantly, research on CSR tends to focus on external pressures and outcomes leading to a neglect of CSR as a dynamic and developing process that relies on the involvement of the employee as a major stakeholder in its co-creation and implementation. Utilizing case study data drawn from a study of a large multinational energy company, we explore how management relies on employees' (...)
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  26.  4
    Responsible Leadership Helps Retain Talent in India.Jonathan P. Doh, Stephen A. Stumpf & Walter G. Tymon - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):85-100.
    The role of responsible leadership—for each leader and as part of a leader’s collective actions—is essential to global competitive success (Doh and Stumpf, Handbook on responsible leadership and governance in global business, 2005 ; Maak and Pless, Responsible leadership, 2006a . Failures in leadership have stimulated interest in understanding “responsible leadership” by researchers and practitioners. Research on responsible leadership draws on stakeholder theory, with employees viewed as a primary stakeholder for the responsible organization (Donaldson and Preston, Acad Manag Rev 20(1):65–91, (...)
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  27.  34
    Corporate Social Responsibility and the Benefits of Employee Trust: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective. [REVIEW]S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Alan D. Boss, R. Wayne Boss & Ingo Angermeier - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):29-45.
    Research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has tended to focus on external stakeholders and outcomes, revealing little about internal effects that might also help explain CSR-firm performance linkages and the impact that corporate marketing strategies can have on internal stakeholders such as employees. The two studies ( N = 1,116 and N = 2,422) presented in this article draw on theory from both corporate marketing and organizational behavior (OB) disciplines to test the general proposition that employee trust partially mediates the (...)
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  28.  34
    Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers' Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures. [REVIEW]Fernanda Duarte - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355 - 368.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) refers to the duty of management to consider and respond to issues beyond the organization's economic and legal requirements in line with social and environmental values. However, 'management' is constituted by real people responsible for routine decisions and formulation and implementation of policies. It can be said therefore that the ethical ideals and beliefs of these individuals - in particular their personal values - play an important role in their decisions. It is contended in this article (...)
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  29.  1
    Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers’ Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures.Fernanda Duarte - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355-368.
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  30.  48
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee—Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557 - 569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors (i. e., CSR associations and CSR participation) to understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) relates to employees' identification with their firm.The results reveal that a firm's CSR initiatives increase employee-company identification (E-C identification).E-C identification, in turn, influences employees' commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees' identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige (PEP). Compared to CSR associations, CSR participation has a direct influence (...)
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  31.  3
    Trickle Effects of Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Kolk Ans, Dolen Willemijn van & Vock Marlene - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):123 - 137.
    Cross-sector social partnerships are often studied from a macro and meso perspective, also in an attempt to assess effectiveness and societal impact. This article pays specific attention to the micro perspective, i.e. individual interactions between and within organizations related to partnerships that address the 'social good'. By focusing on the potential effects and mechanisms at the level of individuals and the organization(s) with which they interact, it aims to help fill a gap in research on partnerships, including more insight into (...)
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  32.  12
    Employee Participation in Cause-Related Marketing Strategies: A Study of Management Perceptions From British Consumer Service Industries.Gordon Liu, Catherine Liston-Heyes & Wai-Wai Ko - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):195-210.
    The purpose of cause-related marketing (CRM) is to publicise and capitalise on a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) by enhancing its legitimacy in the eyes of its stakeholders. This study focuses on the firm's internal stakeholders - i.e. its employees - and the extent of their involvement in the selection of social campaigns. Whilst the difficulties of managing a firm that has lost or damaged its legitimacy in the eyes of its employees are well known, little is understood about the (...)
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  33.  7
    Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Operational Identity: A Case Study of Benetton.Janet L. Borgerson, Jonathan E. Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (3):209-223.
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  34. Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Operational Identity: A Case Study of Benetton.Janet L. Borgerson, Jonathan E. Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (3):209-223.
    This article investigates conceptual and strategic relationships between corporate identity, organizational identity and ethics, utilizing the Benetton Corporation as an illustrative case study. Although much attention has been given to visual aspects of Benetton's renowned ethical brand building efforts, few studies have looked at how Benetton's employees, retail environments and trade events express ethical aspects of their well-known corporate identity. A multi-method case study, including interviews at retail outlets and trade events, sheds light on several important yet under-studied components of (...)
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  35.  29
    Applying Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for CSR: A Canadian Perspective on a Win–Win for Stakeholders and SMEs.Kyla Fisher, Jessica Geenen, Marie Jurcevic, Katya McClintock & Glynn Davis - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (1):66-82.
    In the December 2006 edition of Harvard Business Review , Michael Porter and Mark Kramer argue that by approaching corporate social responsibility (CSR) based on corporate priorities, strengths and abilities, firms can develop socially and fiscally responsible solutions to current CSR issues, which will provide operational and competitive advantages. We agree that an effective approach to CSR includes a mapping of strategy, risk and opportunity. However, we also caution that the identification of these to the exclusion of societal input may (...)
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  36.  24
    Inverting the Pyramid of Values? Trends in Less-Developed Countries.Halter Maria Virginia & Arruda Maria Cecilia Coutinho de - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):267 - 275.
    The authors discuss the consistency of transnational companies in their home, as well as in less developed host countries, concerning ethics, values and social responsibility. Ethical behavior offers good reputation, credibility and tradition to the corporation. It leads to corporate social, environmental and economic responsibilities, cooperating to the desired sustainability. This paper analyzes the inversion of values that corporate governance systems have suffered. The meaning and implication of the corporate social responsibility is investigated and discussed. A "pyramid of values" is (...)
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