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Yali Cong (2004). Doctor-Family-Patient Relationship: The Chinese Paradigm of Informed Consent.

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  1. Patients’ Perception of Dignity in Iranian General Hospital Settings.Fahimeh Alsadat Hosseini, Marzieh Momennasab, Shahrzad Yektatalab & Armin Zareiyan - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301877207.
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    Lost in ‘Culturation’: Medical Informed Consent in China.Vera Lúcia Raposo - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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    Re-Thinking the Role of the Family in Medical Decision-Making.Mark J. Cherry - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):451-472.
    This paper challenges the foundational claim that the human family is no more than a social construction. It advances the position that the family is a central category of experience, being, and knowledge. Throughout, the analysis argues for the centrality of the family for human flourishing and, consequently, for the importance of sustaining family-oriented practices within social policy, such as more family-oriented approaches to consent to medical treatment. Where individually oriented approaches to medical decision-making accent an ethos of isolated personal (...)
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  4.  6
    Informed Consent: The Decisional Standing of Families.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):363-370.
  5.  6
    Taking the Role of the Family Seriously in Treating Chinese Psychiatric Patients: A Confucian Familist Review of China’s First Mental Health Act.Ruiping Fan & Mingxu Wang - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):387-399.
    This essay argues that the Chinese Mental Health Act of 2013 is overly individualistic and fails to give proper moral weight to the role of Chinese families in directing the process of decision-making for hospitalizing and treating the mentally ill patients. We present three types of reactions within the medical community to the Act, each illustrated with a case and discussion. In the first two types of cases, we argue that these reactions are problematic either because they comply with the (...)
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    Risk-Taking: Individual and Family Interests.Ana S. Iltis - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):437-450.
    Decisions regarding clinical procedures or research participation typically require the informed consent of individuals. When individuals are unable to give consent, the informed permission of a legally authorized representative or surrogate is required. Although many proposed procedures are aimed primarily at benefiting the individual, some are not. I argue that, particularly when individuals are asked to assume risks primarily or exclusively for the benefit of others, family members ought to be engaged in the informed consent process. Examples of procedures in (...)
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  7.  30
    Building Social and Economic Capital: The Family and Medical Savings Accounts.M. J. Cherry - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):526-544.
    Despite the well-documented social, economic, and adaptive advantages for young children, adolescents, and adults, the traditional family in the West is in decline. A growing percentage of men and women choose not to be bound by the traditional moral and social expectations of marriage and family life. Adults are much more likely than in the past to live as sexually active singles, with a concomitant increase in forms of social isolation as well as in the number of children born outside (...)
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    Best Interests Determination Within the Singapore Context.L. R. Krishna - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (6):787-799.
    Familialism is a significant mindset within Singaporean culture. Its effects through the practice of familial determination and filial piety, which calls for a family centric approach to care determination over and above individual autonomy, affect many elements of local care provision. However, given the complex psychosocial, political and cultural elements involved, the applicability and viability of this model as well as that of a physician-led practice is increasingly open to conjecture. This article will investigate some of these concerns before proffering (...)
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  9.  28
    The Confucian Bioethics of Surrogate Decision Making: Its Communitarian Roots.Ruiping Fan - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):301-313.
    The family is the exemplar community of Chinese society. This essay explores how Chinese communitarian norms, expressed in thick commitments to the authority and autonomy of the family, are central to contemporary Chinese bioethics. In particular, it focuses on the issue of surrogate decision making to illustrate the Confucian family-grounded communitarian bioethics. The essay first describes the way in which the family, in Chinese bioethics, functions as a whole to provide consent for significant medical and surgical interventions when a patient (...)
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  10.  48
    The Family and Harmonious Medical Decision Making: Cherishing an Appropriate Confucian Moral Balance.X. Chen & R. Fan - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):573-586.
    This essay illustrates what the Chinese family-based and harmony-oriented model of medical decision making is like as well as how it differs from the modern Western individual-based and autonomy-oriented model in health care practice. The essay discloses the roots of the Chinese model in the Confucian account of the family and the Confucian view of harmony. By responding to a series of questions posed to the Chinese model by modern Western scholars in terms of the basic individualist concerns and values (...)
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  11. Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW]H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr - 2010 - In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Social Philosophy and Policy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  12.  27
    Beyond the Best Interests of Children: Four Views of the Family and of Foundational Disagreements Regarding Pediatric Decision Making.H. T. Engelhardt - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):499-517.
    This paper presents four different understandings of the family and their concomitant views of the authority of the family in pediatric medical decision making. These different views are grounded in robustly developed, and conflicting, worldviews supported by disparate basic premises about the nature of morality. The traditional worldviews are often found within religious communities that embrace foundational metaphysical premises at odds with the commitments of the liberal account of the family dominant in the secular culture of the West. These disputes (...)
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  13.  38
    Informed Consent Practices in Nigeria.Emmanuel R. Ezeome & Patricia A. Marshall - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):138-148.
    Most writing on informed consent in Africa highlights different cultural and social attributes that influence informed consent practices, especially in research settings. This review presents a composite picture of informed consent in Nigeria using empirical studies and legal and regulatory prescriptions, as well as clinical experience. It shows that Nigeria, like most other nations in Africa, is a mixture of sociocultural entities, and, notwithstanding the multitude of factors affecting it, informed consent is evolving along a purely Western model. Empirical studies (...)
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    A Survey of the Ethics Climate of Hong Kong Public Hospitals.E. C. Hui - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (3):132-140.
    The main objective of the study was to survey health-care practitioners' (HCPs) perception of health-care practices that are of medical–ethical importance in Hong Kong public hospitals, and to identify the moral issues that concern them most. A total of 2718 doctors, nurses, allied health and administrative workers from 14 hospitals participated. HCPs considered that communication/conflict between patients/families and HCPs was the most important issue, followed by issues concerning patients' rights and values. The ‘ethics climate’ in Hong Kong public hospitals was (...)
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  15.  34
    Parental Refusal of Life-Saving Treatments for Adolescents: Chinese Familism in Medical Decision-Making Re-Visited.Edwin Hui - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (5):286-295.
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  16.  51
    A Confucian View of Personhood and Bioethics.Erika Yu & Ruiping Fan - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):171-179.
    This paper focuses on Confucian formulations of personhood and the implications they may have for bioethics and medical practice. We discuss how an appreciation of the Confucian concept of personhood can provide insights into the practice of informed consent and, in particular, the role of family members and physicians in medical decision-making in societies influenced by Confucian culture. We suggest that Western notions of informed consent appear ethically misguided when viewed from a Confucian perspective.
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