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  1. Institutional Investors, Political Connections, and the Incidence of Regulatory Enforcement Against Corporate Fraud.Wenfeng Wu, Sofia A. Johan & Oliver M. Rui - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):709-726.
    We investigate two under-explored factors in mitigating the risk of corporate fraud and regulatory enforcement against fraud, namely institutional investors and political connections. The role of institutional investors in the effective monitoring of a firm’s management is well established in the literature. We further observe that firms that have a large proportion of their shares held by institutional investors have a lower incidence of enforcement actions against corporate fraud. The importance of political connections for enterprises, whether in a developed market (...)
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  • Executive Compensation and Corporate Fraud in China.Martin J. Conyon & Lerong He - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):669-691.
    This study investigates the relation between CEO compensation and corporate fraud in China. We document a significantly negative correlation between CEO compensation and corporate fraud using data on publicly traded firms between 2005 and 2010. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that firms penalize CEOs for fraud by lowering their pay. We also find that CEO compensation is lower in firms that commit more severe frauds. Panel data fixed effects and propensity score methods are used to demonstrate these effects. (...)
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  • Sustainable and Ethical Entrepreneurship, Corporate Finance and Governance, and Institutional Reform in China.Douglas Cumming, Wenxuan Hou & Edward Lee - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):505-508.
  • Factors Eliciting Corporate Fraud in Emerging Markets: Case of Firms Subject to Enforcement Actions in Malaysia.Abdul Ghafoor, Rozaimah Zainudin & Nurul Shahnaz Mahdzan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    This study investigates the key factors that elicit financial reporting fraud among companies in Malaysia. Using enforcement action releases issued by the Security Commission of Malaysia and Bursa Malaysia, we identify a sample of 76 firms that had committed financial reporting fraud during the period of 1996–2016. We use the fraud triangle framework and the Malaysian International Standards on Auditing 240 to identify the factors. Since the simple probit model fails to address the identification problem, we estimate our results using (...)
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  • Equity Incentives and Corporate Fraud in China.Lars Helge Hass, Monika Tarsalewska & Feng Zhan - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (4):723-742.
    This paper explores how managers’ and supervisors’ equity incentives impact the likelihood of committing corporate fraud in Chinese-listed firms. Previous research has shown that corporate fraud in China is a widespread phenomenon and has severe consequences for affected firms and executives. However, our understanding of the reasons that fraud is committed in a Chinese setting has been very limited thus far. This is an increasingly important topic, because corporate governance is rapidly changing in China, and it is unclear whether adopting (...)
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  • Is Corporate Governance in China Related to Performance Persistence?Lars Helge Haß, Sofia Johan & Denis Schweizer - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):575-592.
    This paper examines the relationship between performance persistence and corporate governance. We document systematic differences in performance persistence across listed companies in China during 2001–2011, and empirically demonstrate that firms with better corporate governance show higher performance persistence. The results are robust over both the short and long terms. We also find that performance persistence is an important factor in refinancing, and it can lower companies’ costs of borrowing. Overall, our findings offer important implications for business ethics, as we demonstrate (...)
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