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  1. Rational and Empirical Medicine in Ninth-Century Baghdad: Qusṭā Ibn Lūqā's Questions on the Critical Days in Acute Illnesses.Glen M. Cooper - 2014 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 24 (1):69-102.
    The article considers a brief catechistic presentation of a Galenic medical doctrine, the critical days, by the 9thcentury translator and thinker, Qusṭā ibn Lūqā, found in a manuscript in Iran. The piece is first shown to have been derived from Galen's treatise on the critical days. Then, it is discussed section by section, in commentary form, to elucidate the medical doctrines Qusṭā propounds. Lastly, the piece is compared with an earlier attempt, by al-Kindī, to describe the critical days mathematically. The (...)
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  • Galen, Divination, and the Status of Medicine.Peter Van Nuffelen - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):337-352.
    Galen's stories about his successes in predicting the development of an illness belong to the best-known anecdotes drawn from his writings. Brilliant pieces of self-presentation, they set Galen apart from his peers, who tried to cover up their ignorance by levelling accusations of magic and divination against their superior colleague. These accusations are usually interpreted as very real threats, as Roman law punished illicit magic and divination. Pointing out that Galen sometimes likes to present himself as a mantis and a (...)
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  • Galen, Divination And The Status Of Medicine.Peter van Nuffelen - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (1):337-352.
    Galen's stories about his successes in predicting the development of an illness belong to the best-known anecdotes drawn from his writings. Brilliant pieces of self-presentation, they set Galen apart from his peers, who tried to cover up their ignorance by levelling accusations of magic and divination against their superior colleague. These accusations are usually interpreted as very real threats, as Roman law punished illicit magic and divination. Pointing out that Galen sometimes likes to present himself as a mantis and a (...)
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