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Cora Diamond (1978). Eating Meat and Eating People.

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  1.  24
    Food Ethics I: Food Production and Food Justice.Anne Barnhill & Tyler Doggett - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (3).
    This piece surveys recent work on the ethics of food production and distribution, paying closest attention to animal agriculture, plant agriculture, food justice, and food sovereignty.
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  2. Ethical Veganism, Virtue, and Greatness of the Soul.Carlo Alvaro - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (6):765-781.
    Many moral philosophers have criticized intensive animal farming because it can be harmful to the environment, it causes pain and misery to a large number of animals, and furthermore eating meat and animal-based products can be unhealthful. The issue of industrially farmed animals has become one of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. On the one hand, utilitarians have argued that we should become vegetarians or vegans because the practices of raising animals for food are immoral since they (...)
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  3.  2
    Traditional Morality and Sacred Values.David McPherson - 2017 - Analyse & Kritik 39 (1):41-62.
    This essay gives an account of how traditional morality is best understood and also why it is worth defending (even if some reform is needed) and how this might be done. Traditional morality is first contrasted with supposedly more enlightened forms of morality, such as utilitarianism and liberal Kantianism (i.e., autonomy-centered ethics). The focus here is on certain sacred values that are central to traditional morality and which highlight this contrast and bring out the attractions of traditional morality. Next, this (...)
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  4. Borders, Affects, and Effects.Manuel Tironi, Beltrán Undurraga, Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, Diego Rossello, Colombina Schaeffer & Claudia Sepúlveda - 2017 - Society and Animals 25 (6):533-552.
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  5.  6
    Eating Human Beings: Varieties of Cannibalism and the Heterogeneity of Human Life.Burley Mikel - 2016 - Philosophy 91 (4):483-501.
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  6.  63
    A Moorean Argument for the Full Moral Status of Those with Profound Intellectual Disability.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):41-45.
    This paper is about the moral status of those human beings with profound intellectual disabilities (PIDs). We hold the common sense view that they have equal status to ‘normal’ human beings, and a higher status than any non-human animal. We start with an admission, however: we don’t know how to give a fully satisfying theoretical account of the grounds of moral status that explains this view. And in fact, not only do we not know how to give such an account, (...)
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  7. The Core Argument for Veganism.Stijn Bruers - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (2):271-290.
    This article presents an argument for veganism, using a formal-axiomatic approach: a list of twenty axioms are explicitly stated. These axioms are all necessary conditions to derive the conclusion that veganism is a moral duty. The presented argument is a minimalist or core argument for veganism, because it is as parsimonious as possible, using the weakest conditions, the narrowest definitions, the most reliable empirical facts and the minimal assumptions necessary to reach the conclusion. If someone does not accept the conclusion, (...)
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  8.  12
    Living Up to Our Humanity: The Elevated Extinction Rate Event and What It Says About Us.Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):339-354.
    Either we are in an elevated extinction rate event or in a mass extinction. Scientists disagree, and the matter cannot be resolved empirically until it is too late. We are the cause of the elevated extinction rate. What does this say about us, we who are Homo sapiens—the wise hominid? Beginning with the Renaissance and spreading during the 18th century, the normative notion of humanity has arisen to stand for what expresses our dignity as humans—specifically our thoughtfulness, in the double (...)
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  9.  7
    Life, Transferable: Questioning the Commodity-Based Approach to Transplantation Ethics.David B. Dillard-Wright - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (2):138-153.
    Some bioethicists have proposed a legalized market in human organs as a solution to transplant waiting lists and global poverty. Solutions to organ procurement problems that are solely market-based would unfairly shift the burdens of medical procedures onto developing nations. Market advocates base their claims on the understanding of organs as property, a position that should be problematized. Instrumentalizing people in this way is part of the broader commodification of animals and the environment. Combating the market mentality requires a return (...)
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  10.  6
    The Face of Suffering The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections Carlson Licia Indiana University Press Bloomington.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2012 - Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (2):205-211.
  11.  10
    Political Animals.Alastair Hunt - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (2):201-203.
  12.  13
    Uncanny Animals: Thinking Differently About Ethics and the Animal–Human Relationship.Rob Irvine, Chris Degeling & Ian Kerridge - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):30-32.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 30-32, September 2012.
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  13.  30
    Comparing Lives: Rush Rhees on Humans and Animals.Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (3):287-311.
    In several posthumously published writings about the differences between humans and animals, Rush Rhees criticises the view that human lives are more important than (or superior to) animal lives. Rhees' views may seem to be in sympathy with more recent critiques of “speciesism.” However, the most commonly discussed anti-speciesist moral frameworks – which take the capacity of sentience as the criterion of moral considerability – are inadequate. Rhees' remark that both humans and animals can be loved points towards a different (...)
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  14.  53
    Religion, Relativism, and Wittgenstein’s Naturalism.Bob Plant - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):177 - 209.
    Abstract Wittgenstein?s remarks on religious and magical practices are often thought to harbour troubling fideistic and relativistic views. Unsurprisingly, commentators are generally resistant to the idea that religious belief constitutes a ?language?game? governed by its own peculiar ?rules?, and is thereby insulated from the critical assessment of non?participants. Indeed, on this fideist?relativist reading, it is unclear how mutual understanding between believers and non?believers (even between different sorts of believers) would be possible. In this paper I do three things: (i) show (...)
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  15. Cynicism and Morality.Samantha Vice - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Our attitude towards cynicism is ambivalent: On the one hand we condemn it as a character failing and a trend that is undermining political and social life; on the other hand, we are often impressed by the apparent realism and honesty of the cynic. My aim in this paper is to offer an account of cynicism that can explain both our attraction and aversion. After defending a particular conception of cynicism, I argue that most of the work in explaining the (...)
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  16.  16
    Cynicism and Morality.Samantha Vice - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):169-184.
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  17. Saving the Polar Bear, Saving the World: Can the Capabilities Approach Do Justice to Humans, Animals and Ecosystems? [REVIEW]Elizabeth Cripps - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (1):1-22.
    Martha Nussbaum has expanded the capabilities approach to defend positive duties of justice to individuals who fall below Rawls’ standard for fully cooperating members of society, including sentient nonhuman animals. Building on this, David Schlosberg has defended the extension of capabilities justice not only to individual animals but also to entire species and ecosystems. This is an attractive vision: a happy marriage of social, environmental and ecological justice, which also respects the claims of individual animals. This paper asks whether it (...)
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  18.  77
    Cosmopolitanism and What It Means to Be Human: Rethinking Ancient and Modern Views on Discerning Humanity.Hektor K. T. Yan - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (1):107-129.
    This paper takes a conceptual look at cosmopolitanism and the related issue of what it means to be human in order to arrive at an alternative conceptual framework which is free from empiricist assumptions. With reference to a discussion on Homer’s Iliad , the author develops a ‘humanist’ model of discerning humanity. This model is then compared and contrasted with Martha Nussbaum’s version of cosmopolitanism. The notion of ‘aspect-seeing’ discussed by Wittgenstein in the second part of the Philosophical Investigations is (...)
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  19. Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions.Ramona Cristina Ilea - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a flurry of other (...)
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  20.  84
    Species as a Relationship.Julia Tanner - 2008 - Acta Analytica 23 (4):337-347.
    The fact that humans have a special relationship to each other insofar as they belong in the same species is often taken to be a morally relevant difference between humans and other animals, one which justifies a greater moral status for all humans, regardless of their individual capacities. I give some reasons why this kind of relationship is not an appropriate ground for differential treatment of humans and nonhumans. I then argue that even if relationships do matter morally species membership (...)
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  21.  47
    The Turing Triage Test.Robert Sparrow - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):203-213.
    If, as a number of writers have predicted, the computers of the future will possess intelligence and capacities that exceed our own then it seems as though they will be worthy of a moral respect at least equal to, and perhaps greater than, human beings. In this paper I propose a test to determine when we have reached that point. Inspired by Alan Turing’s (1950) original “Turing test”, which argued that we would be justified in conceding that machines could think (...)
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  22.  42
    Animal Thoughts.Raimond Gaita - 1992 - Philosophical Investigations 15 (3):227-44.
  23. Your Daughter or Your Dog? A Feminist Assessment of the Animal Research Issue.Deborah Slicer - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):108-124.
    I bring several ecofeminist critiques of deep ecology to bear on mainstream animal rights theories, especially on the rights and utilitarian treatments of the animal research issue. Throughout, I show how animal rights issues are feminist issues and clarify the relationship between ecofeminism and animal rights.
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  24.  3
    Ethological Motivational Theory as a Basis for Assessing Animal Suffering.John Archer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):12-13.
  25.  10
    The Significance of Seeking the Animal's Perspective.Arnold Arluke - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):13-14.
  26.  1
    The Importance of Measures of Poor Welfare.D. M. Broom - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14.
  27.  6
    Animal Suffering, Critical Anthropomorphism, and Reproductive Rights.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14-15.
  28.  3
    Having the Imagination to Suffer, and to Prevent Suffering.Richard W. Byrne - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):15-16.
  29.  4
    On the Neurobiological Basis of Suffering.C. Richard Chapman - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):16-17.
  30.  5
    Animal Suffering: The Practical Way Forward.Robert Dantzer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):17-18.
  31. From an Animal's Point of View: Motivation, Fitness, and Animal Welfare.Marian S. Dawkins - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):1-9.
    To study animal welfare empirically we need an objective basis for deciding when an animal is suffering. Suffering includes a wide range ofunpleasant emotional states such as fear, boredom, pain, and hunger. Suffering has evolved as a mechanism for avoiding sources ofdanger and threats to fitness. Captive animals often suffer in situations in which they are prevented from doing something that they are highly motivated to do. The an animal is prepared to pay to attain or to escape a situation (...)
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  32.  5
    Other Minds and Other Species.Marian Stamp Dawkins - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):49-61.
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  33.  5
    On Singer: More Argument, Less Prescriptivism.David DeGrazia - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):18.
  34.  7
    Epistemology, Ethics, and Evolution.Strachan Donnelley - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):18-19.
  35.  5
    The Philosophical Foundations of Animal Welfare.John Dupré - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):19-20.
  36.  7
    Taking the Animal's Viewpoint Seriously.Michael Allen Fox - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):20-21.
  37.  3
    Concepts of Suffering in Veterinary Science.Andrew F. Fraser - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):21-22.
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  38.  4
    Animals, Science, and Morality.R. G. Frey - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22.
  39.  35
    In Defence of Speciesism.J. A. Gray - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22-23.
  40.  2
    Experimental Investigation of Animal Suffering.B. O. Hughes & J. C. Petherick - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):23-24.
  41.  2
    Singer's Intermediate Conclusion.Frank Jackson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):24-25.
  42.  15
    Science and Subjective Feelings.Dale Jamieson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):25-26.
  43.  6
    Hidden Adaptationism.David Magnus & Peter Thiel - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):26.
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  44.  4
    Obtaining and Applying Objective Criteria in Animal Welfare.Anne E. Magurran - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):26-27.
  45.  1
    Suffering by Analogy.David McFarland - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):27.
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  46.  5
    Consumer Demand Theory and Social Behavior: All Chickens Are Not Equal.Joy A. Mench & W. Ray Stricklin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):28.
  47.  2
    Development Experience and the Potential for Suffering: Does “Out of Experience” Mean “Out of Mind”?Michael Mendl - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):28-29.
  48.  1
    Consumer Demand: Can We Deal with Differing Priorities?P. Monaghan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):29-30.
  49.  6
    The Case for and Difficulties in Using “Demand Areas” to Measure Changes in Well-Being.Yew-Kwang Ng - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):30-31.
  50.  2
    Seeking the Sources of Simian Suffering.Melinda A. Novak & Jerrold S. Meyer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):31-32.
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