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Leda Cosmides (1989). The Logic of Social Exchange: Has Natural Selection Shaped How Humans Reason? Studies with the Wason Selection Task.

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  1.  7
    Reasoning Logically in Cognitive Domains.Claudia Casadio - forthcoming - Logic Journal of the IGPL:jzw020.
  2.  1
    Integrative and Separationist Perspectives: Understanding the Causal Role of Cultural Transmission in Human Language Evolution.Francesco Suman - forthcoming - Biological Theory:1-15.
    Biological evolution and cultural evolution are distinct evolutionary processes; they are apparent also in human language, where both processes contributed in shaping its evolution. However, the nature of the interaction between these two processes is still debated today. It is often claimed that the emergence of modern language was preceded by the evolution of a language-ready brain: the latter is usually intended as a product of biological evolution, while the former is believed to be the consequence of cultural processes. I (...)
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    Marking the Perception–Cognition Boundary: The Criterion of Stimulus-Dependence.Jacob Beck - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (2):319-334.
    Philosophy, scientific psychology, and common sense all distinguish perception from cognition. While there is little agreement about how the perception–cognition boundary ought to be drawn, one prominent idea is that perceptual states are dependent on a stimulus, or stimulus-dependent, in a way that cognitive states are not. This paper seeks to develop this idea in a way that can accommodate two apparent counterexamples: hallucinations, which are prima facie perceptual yet stimulus-independent; and demonstrative thoughts, which are prima facie cognitive yet stimulus-dependent. (...)
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  4.  25
    Dual Process Theory: Systems, Types, Minds, Modes, Kinds or Metaphors? A Critical Review.Samuel C. Bellini-Leite - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (2):213-225.
    Dual process theory proposes clusters of features that form two dichotomous groups in cognition. One standing internal issue is defining what the reference of these two dichotomous groups could be in the mind or brain. Does dual process theory speak of two systems, types, minds, modes, kinds or just metaphors? A particular common answer is that differences in clusters of features are evidence of different underlying systems, often called system 1 and system 2. However, the suggestion to abandon the ‘system’ (...)
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  5.  3
    Enhanced Action Control as a Prior Function of Episodic Memory.Rau Philipp & Botterill George - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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    The Grand Challenges for Evolutionary Psychology: Survival Challenges for a Discipline.Peter K. Jonason - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  7.  6
    Modularity of Mind: Is It Time to Abandon This Ship?Martin Palecek - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (2):132-144.
    This article evaluates the idea of the modularity of mind and domain specificity. This concept has penetrated the behavioral disciplines, and in the case of some of these—for example, the cognitive study of religion—has even formed their foundation. Although the theoretical debate relating to the idea of modularity is ongoing, this debate has not been reflected in the use of modularity in behavioral research. The idea of domain specificity or modularity of mind is not without its controversies, and there is (...)
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    The Infamous Among Us: Enhanced Reputational Memory for Uncooperative Ingroup Members.Stefanie Hechler, Franz J. Neyer & Thomas Kessler - 2016 - Cognition 157:1-13.
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    Trustworthy Tricksters: Violating a Negative Social Expectation Affects Source Memory and Person Perception When Fear of Exploitation Is High.Süssenbach Philipp, Gollwitzer Mario, Mieth Laura, Buchner Axel & Bell Raoul - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  10.  2
    Costly Rejection of Wrongdoers by Infants and Children.Arber Tasimi & Karen Wynn - 2016 - Cognition 151:76-79.
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    Measuring Individual Differences in Decision Biases: Methodological Considerations.Balazs Aczel, Bence Bago, Aba Szollosi, Andrei Foldes & Bence Lukacs - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  12.  10
    Evolved Mechanisms Versus Underlying Conditional Relations.Miguel López Astorga - 2015 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 40 (1):241-253.
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  13. Toward an Ecological Analysis of Bayesian Inferences: How Task Characteristics Influence Responses.Sebastian Hafenbrädl & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14.  1
    Why I Teach the Controversy: Using Creationism to Teach Critical Thinking.P. Lynne Honey - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  15.  12
    Constructive Criticism: An Evaluation of Buller and Hardcastle's Genetic and Neuroscientific Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology.Catherine Driscoll - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (6):907-925.
    David Buller and Valerie Hardcastle have argued that various discoveries about the genetics and nature of brain development show that most ?central? psychological mechanisms cannot be adaptations because the nature of the contribution from the environment on which they are based shows they are not heritable. Some philosophers and scientists have argued that a strong role for the environment is compatible with high heritability as long as the environment is highly stable down lineages. In this paper I support this view (...)
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  16. Facing Danger: How Do People Behave in Times of Need? The Case of Adult Attachment Styles.Tsachi Ein-Dor - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  17.  1
    Reason and Less.Vinod Goel - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  18.  2
    Context-Dependent Social Evaluation in 4.5-Month-Old Human Infants: The Role of Domain-General Versus Domain-Specific Processes in the Development of Social Evaluation. [REVIEW]J. K. Hamlin - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  19.  60
    It’s the Knobe Effect, Stupid!Hanno Sauer - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (4):485-503.
    People asymmetrically attribute various agential features such as intentionality, knowledge, or causal impact to other agents when something of normative significance is at stake. I will argue that three questions are of primary interest in the debate about this effect. A methodological question about how to explain it at all; a substantive question about how to explain it correctly: and a normative question about whether to explain it in terms of an error or a legitimate judgmental pattern. The problem, I (...)
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  20.  2
    Anxious Ultimatums: How Anxiety Disorders Affect Socioeconomic Behaviour.Alessandro Grecucci, Cinzia Giorgetta, Paolo Brambilla, Sophia Zuanon, Laura Perini, Matteo Balestrieri, Nicolao Bonini & Alan G. Sanfey - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (2):230-244.
  21.  17
    Dificultades de la Lógica Deóntica: El Problema de Las Tareas Abstractas.Miguel López Astorga - 2013 - Trans/Form/Ação 36 (3):187-202.
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  22. Rational Self-Doubt and the Failure of Closure.Joshua Schechter - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (2):428-452.
    Closure for justification is the claim that thinkers are justified in believing the logical consequences of their justified beliefs, at least when those consequences are competently deduced. Many have found this principle to be very plausible. Even more attractive is the special case of Closure known as Single-Premise Closure. In this paper, I present a challenge to Single-Premise Closure. The challenge is based on the phenomenon of rational self-doubt – it can be rational to be less than fully confident in (...)
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  23.  2
    Do Social Utility Judgments Influence Attentional Processing?Danielle M. Shore & Erin A. Heerey - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):114-122.
  24. Analogical Cognition: Applications in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Mind and Language.Theodore Bach - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (5):348-360.
    Analogical cognition refers to the ability to detect, process, and learn from relational similarities. The study of analogical and similarity cognition is widely considered one of the ‘success stories’ of cognitive science, exhibiting convergence across many disciplines on foundational questions. Given the centrality of analogy to mind and knowledge, it would benefit philosophers investigating topics in epistemology and the philosophies of mind and language to become familiar with empirical models of analogical cognition. The goal of this essay is to describe (...)
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  25.  17
    Why Philosophy Needs Logical Psychologism.Vanessa Lehan-Streisel - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (4):575-586.
    In this paper, I argue that social psychologism is the most philosophically appealing form of psychologism. I present two arguments in support of social psychologism. The first is that this form of psychologism allows philosophers to justify normative claims about human reasoning. In the second part of this paper I argue that social psychologism ameliorates historical concerns with psychologism in general. The conclusion I draw from this discussion is that a need to outline and justify a normative system for deductive (...)
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  26.  4
    A Memory Advantage for Untrustworthy Faces.Nicholas O. Rule, Michael L. Slepian & Nalini Ambady - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):207-218.
  27. Morally Irrelevant Factors: What's Left of the Dual Process-Model of Moral Cognition?Hanno Sauer - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (6):783-811.
    Current developments in empirical moral psychology have spawned a new perspective on the traditional metaethical question of whether moral judgment is based on reason or emotion. Psychologists and cognitive neuroscientists such as Joshua Greene argue that there is empirical evidence that emotion is essential for one particularly important subclass of moral judgments: so-called ?deontological judgments.? In this paper, I scrutinize this claim and argue that neither the empirical evidence for Greene's dual process-theory of moral judgment nor the normative conclusions it (...)
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  28.  47
    A Partial Defense of Intuition on Naturalist Grounds.Joseph Shieber - 2012 - Synthese 187 (2):321-341.
    The debate concerning the role of intuitions in philosophy has been characterized by a fundamental disagreement between two main camps. The first, the autonomists, hold that, due to the use in philosophical investigation of appeals to intuition, most of the central questions of philosophy can in principle be answered by philosophical investigation and argument without relying on the sciences. The second, the naturalists, deny the possibility of a priori knowledge and are skeptical of the role of intuition in providing evidence (...)
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  29.  18
    Defining Features Versus Incidental Correlates of Type 1 and Type 2 Processing.Keith E. Stanovich & Maggie E. Toplak - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (1):3-13.
    Many critics of dual-process models have mistaken long lists of descriptive terms in the literature for a full-blown theory of necessarily co-occurring properties. These critiques have distracted attention from the cumulative progress being made in identifying the much smaller set of properties that truly do define Type 1 and Type 2 processing. Our view of the literature is that autonomous processing is the defining feature of Type 1 processing. Even more convincing is the converging evidence that the key feature of (...)
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  30. The “Rationality Wars” in Psychology: Where They Are and Where They Could Go.Thomas Sturm - 2012 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (1):66-81.
    Current psychology of human reasoning is divided into several different approaches. For instance, there is a major dispute over the question whether human beings are able to apply norms of the formal models of rationality such as rules of logic, or probability and decision theory, correctly. While researchers following the “heuristics and biases” approach argue that we deviate systematically from these norms, and so are perhaps deeply irrational, defenders of the “bounded rationality” approach think not only that the evidence for (...)
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  31.  23
    Encouraging Active Classroom Discussion of Academic Integrity and Misconduct in Higher Education Business Contexts.Mark Baetz, Lucia Zivcakova, Eileen Wood, Amanda Nosko, Domenica de Pasquale & Karin Archer - 2011 - Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (3):217-234.
    The present study assessed business students’ responses to an innovative interactive presentation on academic integrity that employed quoted material from previous students as launching points for discussion. In total, 15 business classes ( n = 412 students) including 2nd, 3rd and 4th year level students participated in the presentations as part of the ethics component of ongoing courses. Students’ perceptions of the importance of academic integrity, self-reports of cheating behaviors, and factors contributing to misconduct were examined along with perceptions about (...)
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  32.  18
    Deonance and Distrust: Motivated Third Party Information Seeking Following Disclosure of an Agent's Unethical Behavior. [REVIEW]Chris M. Bell & Kelley J. Main - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):77-96.
    This article explores the hypothesis that third parties are motivated to seek information about agents who have behaved unethically in the past, even if the agent and available information are irrelevant to the third parties’ goals and interests. We explored two possible motives for this information seeking behavior: deonance, or the motive to care about ethics and justice simply for the sake of ethics and justice, and distrust-based threat monitoring. Participants in a consumer decision task were found to seek out (...)
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  33.  94
    The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control.Thomas T. Hills - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further discussion addresses evidence required for (...)
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  34.  14
    Science, Politics, and Evolution. By Elisabeth A. Lloyd.Sarah S. Richardson - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):455-459.
  35. The Reliability Challenge and the Epistemology of Logic.Joshua Schechter - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):437-464.
    We think of logic as objective. We also think that we are reliable about logic. These views jointly generate a puzzle: How is it that we are reliable about logic? How is it that our logical beliefs match an objective domain of logical fact? This is an instance of a more general challenge to explain our reliability about a priori domains. In this paper, I argue that the nature of this challenge has not been properly understood. I explicate the challenge (...)
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  36.  16
    Evolutionary Psychology and Business Ethics Research.Sefa Hayibor - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):587-616.
    In this article, we describe evolutionary psychology and its potential contribution to business ethics research. After summarizing evolutionary theory and natural selection, we specifically address the use of evolutionary concepts in psychology in order to offer alternative explanations of behavior relevant to business ethics, such as social exchange, cooperation, altruism, and reciprocity. Our position is that individuals, groups, and organizations all are affected by similar natural, evolutionary processes, such that evolutionary psychology is applicable at multiple levels of analysis (e.g., individual (...)
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  37.  56
    The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
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  38.  43
    The Uncertain Reasoner: Bayes, Logic, and Rationality.Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):105-120.
    Human cognition requires coping with a complex and uncertain world. This suggests that dealing with uncertainty may be the central challenge for human reasoning. In Bayesian Rationality we argue that probability theory, the calculus of uncertainty, is the right framework in which to understand everyday reasoning. We also argue that probability theory explains behavior, even on experimental tasks that have been designed to probe people's logical reasoning abilities. Most commentators agree on the centrality of uncertainty; some suggest that there is (...)
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  39.  31
    Altruism Can Be Assessed Correctly Based on Impression.Ryo Oda, Noriko Yamagata, Yuki Yabiku & Akiko Matsumoto-Oda - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (3):331-341.
    Detection of genuine altruists could be a solution to the problem of subtle cheating. Brown et al. (Evol Psychol 1:42–69, 2003) found that humans could detect altruists using nonverbal cues. However, their experiments can be improved upon in several ways, and further investigation is needed to determine whether altruist-detection abilities are human universals. In our experiment, we used video clips of natural conversations as the stimulus. We asked a sample of Japanese undergraduates to rate their own level of altruism and (...)
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  40.  25
    Quinean Social Skills: Empirical Evidence From Eye-Gaze Against Information Encapsulation.Mitch Parsell - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (1):1-19.
    Since social skills are highly significant to the evolutionary success of humans, we should expect these skills to be efficient and reliable. For many Evolutionary Psychologists efficiency entails encapsulation: the only way to get an efficient system is via information encapsulation. But encapsulation reduces reliability in opaque epistemic domains. And the social domain is darkly opaque: people lie and cheat, and deliberately hide their intentions and deceptions. Modest modularity [Currie and Sterelny (2000) Philos Q 50:145–160] attempts to combine efficiency and (...)
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  41.  79
    Logic and Social Cognition.Rineke Verbrugge - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (6):649-680.
    This article takes off from Johan van Benthem’s ruminations on the interface between logic and cognitive science in his position paper “Logic and reasoning: Do the facts matter?”. When trying to answer Van Benthem’s question whether logic can be fruitfully combined with psychological experiments, this article focuses on a specific domain of reasoning, namely higher-order social cognition, including attributions such as “Bob knows that Alice knows that he wrote a novel under pseudonym”. For intelligent interaction, it is important that the (...)
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  42.  24
    Does Job Function Influence Ethical Reasoning? An Adapted Wason Task Application.David M. Wasieleski & James Weber - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):187 - 199.
    A review of extent business ethics research uncovered well over 200 published articles that investigated the role of job functions within a business organization as an explanatory factor of ethical or unethical behavior. While an important body of work, ethical breaches are often found to cut across job functions and involve multiple disciplines embedded in a business organization. This research seeks to explore a crossfunctional explanation for ethical reasoning by using an instrument new to business ethics research, the Wason selection (...)
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  43.  20
    Is Domain-General Thinking a Domain-Specific Adaptation?Vittorio Girotto & Katya Tentori - 2008 - Mind and Society 7 (2):167-175.
    According to Kanazawa (Psychol Rev 111:512–523, 2004), general intelligence, which he considers as a synonym of abstract thinking, evolved specifically to allow our ancestors to deal with evolutionary novel problems while conferring no advantage in solving evolutionary familiar ones. We present a study whereby the results contradict Kanazawa’s hypothesis by demonstrating that performance on an evolutionary novel problem (an abstract reasoning task) predicts performance on an evolutionary familiar problem (a social reasoning task).
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  44.  60
    The Psychology of Meta-Ethics: Exploring Objectivism.Geoffrey P. Goodwin & John M. Darley - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1339-1366.
  45.  13
    The Wiles of Evolutionary Psychology and the Indeterminacy of Selection.Justin Leiber - 2008 - Philosophical Forum 39 (1):53–72.
  46.  60
    Espousing Interactions and Fielding Reactions: Addressing Laypeople's Beliefs About Genetic Determinism.David S. Moore - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):331 – 348.
    Although biologists and philosophers of science generally agree that genes cannot determine the forms of biological and psychological traits, students, journalists, politicians, and other members of the general public nonetheless continue to embrace genetic determinism. This article identifies some of the concerns typically raised by individuals when they first encounter the systems perspective that biologists and philosophers of science now favor over genetic determinism, and uses arguments informed by that perspective to address those concerns. No definitive statements can yet be (...)
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  47.  26
    Breaking the Rules: Examining the Facilitation Effects of Moral Intensity Characteristics on the Recognition of Rule Violations.David M. Wasieleski & Sefa Hayibor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):275-289.
    This research project seeks to discover whether certain characteristics of a moral issue facilitate individuals’ abilities to detect violators of a conditional rule. In business, conditional rules are often framed in terms of a social contract between employer and employee. Of significant concern to business ethicists is the fact that these social contracts are frequently breached. Some researchers in the field of evolutionary psychology argue that there is a biological basis to social contract formation and dissolution in business. However, although (...)
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  48. The Drink You Have When You're Not Having a Drink.Robert A. Wilson - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (3):273–283.
    The Architecture of the Mind is itself built on foundations that deserve probing. In this brief commentary I focus on these foundations—Carruthers’ conception of modularity, his arguments for thinking that the mind is massively modular in structure, and his view of human cognitive architecture.
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  49. Massive Redeployment, Exaptation, and the Functional Integration of Cognitive Operations.Michael L. Anderson - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):329 - 345.
    Abstract: The massive redeployment hypothesis (MRH) is a theory about the functional topography of the human brain, offering a middle course between strict localization on the one hand, and holism on the other. Central to MRH is the claim that cognitive evolution proceeded in a way analogous to component reuse in software engineering, whereby existing components-originally developed to serve some specific purpose-were used for new purposes and combined to support new capacities, without disrupting their participation in existing programs. If the (...)
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  50.  30
    Precis of the Rational Imagination: How People Create Alternatives to Reality.Ruth Mj Byrne - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):439-452.
    The human imagination remains one of the last uncharted terrains of the mind. People often imagine how events might have turned out something had been different. The of reality, those aspects more readily changed, indicate that counterfactual thoughts are guided by the same principles as rational thoughts. In the past, rationality and imagination have been viewed as opposites. But research has shown that rational thought is more imaginative than cognitive scientists had supposed. In The Rational Imagination, I argue that imaginative (...)
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