Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Does Equity Ownership Matter for Corporate Social Responsibility? A Literature Review of Theories and Recent Empirical Findings.Christian M. Faller & Dodo zu Knyphausen-Aufseß - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):15-40.
    Based on the concept of shareholder primacy, many scholars have argued that it is more important for businesses to earn profits for their shareholders than to provide benefits to society at large. Corporate social responsibility is often regarded as an investment that comes at the expense of shareholders. In contrast, research analyzing the connections between the equity ownership structure of a company and its level of CSR engagement suggests that CSR offers benefits to shareholders that go beyond direct financial returns (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Monitoring Intensity and Stakeholders' Orientation: How Does Governance Affect Social and Environmental Disclosure? [REVIEW]Christine Mallin, Giovanna Michelon & Davide Raggi - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):29-43.
    The aim of the paper is to investigate the effects of the corporate governance model on social and environmental disclosure (SED). We analyze the disclosures of the 100 U.S. Best Corporate Citizens in the period 2005–2007, and we posit a series of simultaneous relationships between different attributes of the governance system and a multidimensional construct of corporate social performance (CSP). We consider both the extent and the quality of SED, with the purpose of identifying increasing levels of corporate commitment to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Think Global, Invest Responsible: Why the Private Equity Industry Goes Green. [REVIEW]Patricia Crifo & Vanina D. Forget - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):21-48.
    The growth of socially responsible investment (SRI) on public financial markets has drawn considerable academic attention over the last decade. Discarding from the previous literature, this article sets up to analyze the Private Equity channel, which is shown to have the potentiality to foster sustainable practices in unlisted companies. The fast integration of the environmental, social and governance issues by mainstream Private Equity investors is unveiled and appears to have benefited from the maturation of SRI on public financial markets and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Do Suppliers Applaud Corporate Social Performance?Min Zhang, Lijun Ma, Jun Su & Wen Zhang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):543-557.
    The influence of corporate social performance on stakeholders is one of the focal issues in corporate social responsibility research. Using data of listed companies in China, this paper examines whether CSR behavior in the form of charitable donations garners a positive reaction from suppliers. Results derived from both level and change model regressions show that superior CSP makes it easier for a firm to obtain trade credit from suppliers, although the effect is significant only in non-state-owned enterprises. The results are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Role of CEO’s Personal Incentives in Driving Corporate Social Responsibility.Michele Fabrizi, Christine Mallin & Giovanna Michelon - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):311-326.
    In this study, we explore the role of Chief Executive Officers’ incentives, split between monetary and non-monetary, in relation to corporate social responsibility. We base our analysis on a sample of 597 US firms over the period 2005–2009. We find that both monetary and non-monetary incentives have an effect on CSR decisions. Specifically, monetary incentives designed to align the CEO’s and shareholders’ interests have a negative effect on CSR and non-monetary incentives have a positive effect on CSR. The study has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Relationship Between Individuals’ Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria.Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583-605.
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or support the community operations for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Critical Events in the Ethics of U.S. Corporation History.S. Douglas Beets - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):193-219.
    The history of corporations in the United States (U.S.) is much older than the country, as it must be understood in the context of the history of peoples of Europe who eventually dominated the North American continent in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These European settlers came, in part, to achieve economic prosperity for themselves and, in many cases, for early forerunners of the modern corporation. These business organizations had predecessors in Europe millennia earlier as ancient Romans had developed a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Financial Performance of a Socially Responsible Investment Over Time and a Possible Link with Corporate Social Responsibility.Greig A. Mill - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):131-148.
    This paper empirically examines the financial performance of a UK unit trust that was initially “conventional” and later adopted socially responsible investment (SRI) principles (ethical investment principles). Comparison is made with three similar conventional funds whose investment objectives remained unchanged. Analysis techniques employed in previous studies find similar results: mean risk-adjusted performance is unchanged by the switch to SRI, with no evidence of over-or under-performance relative to the benchmark market index by any of the four funds. More interestingly, changes in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds – Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99 - 129.
    >With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporations long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a companys long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Morals or Economics? Institutional Investor Preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility.Henry L. Petersen & Harrie Vredenburg - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):1-14.
    This article presents the results of a study that analysed whether social responsibility had any bearing on the decision making of institutional investors. Being that institutional investors prefer socially aligned organizations, this study explored to what extent the corporate actions and/or social/environmental investments influenced their decisions. Our results suggest that there are specific variables that affect the perceived value of the organization, leading to decisions to not only invest, but whether to hold or sell the shares, and therefore having a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • How Can a Ratings-Based Method for Assessing Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) Provide an Incentive to Firms Excluded From Socially Responsible Investment Indices to Invest in Csr?Avshalom Madhala Adam & Tal Shavit - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):899 - 905.
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) indices play a major role in the stock markets. A connection between doing good and doing well in business is implied. Leading indices, such as the Domini Social Index and others, exemplify the movement toward investing in socially responsible corporations. However, the question remains: Does the ratings-based methodology for assessing corporate social responsibility (CSR) provide an incentive to firms excluded from SRI indices to invest in CSR? Not in its current format. The ratings-based methodology employed by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Finance as a Driver of Corporate Social Responsibility.Bert Scholtens - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):19-33.
    Finance is grease to the economy. Therefore, we assume that it may affect corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the sustainability of economic development too. This paper discusses the transmission mechanisms between finance and sustainability. We find that there is no simple one-to-one relationship between financial development and sustainable development but there are various – often indirect – linkages. It appears that most of the literature concentrates on the role of public shareholders when it comes to changing corporate policy and performance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW]Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or support the community operations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Financial Performance of Socially Responsible Investing : What Have We Learned? A Meta‐Analysis.Christophe Revelli & Jean-Laurent Viviani - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (2):158-185.
    With a meta-analysis of 85 studies and 190 experiments, the authors test the relationship between socially responsible investing and financial performance to determine whether including corporate social responsibility and ethical concerns in portfolio management is more profitable than conventional investment policies. The study also analyses the influence of researcher methodologies with respect to several dimensions of SRI on the effects identified. The results indicate that the consideration of corporate social responsibility in stock market portfolios is neither a weakness nor a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Identifying Impediments to SRI in Europe: A Review of the Practitioner and Academic Literature. [REVIEW]Alan Lewis Carmen Juravle - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (3):285-310.
    For more than 15 years, the investment community and the academic community have written extensively on socially responsible investment. Despite the abundance of SRI thought, the adoption of SRI practices among institutional investors is a comparative rarity. This paper endeavours to achieve two goals. First, by integrating the practitioner and academic literature on the topic, the paper attempts to identify the many impediments to SRI in Europe from an institutional investor's perspective. Second, the paper proposes a unitary framework to conceptually (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Is the Era of the Therapy by Tailor-Made Stem Cell Coming?Miyako Okada-Takagi - 2008 - In Darryl R. J. Macer (ed.), Asia-Pacific Perspectives on Biotechnology and Bioethics. Unesco Bangkok. pp. 1987.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Challenges of Socially Responsible Investment Among Institutional Investors: Exploring the Links Between Corporate Pension Funds and Corporate Governance.Laura Albareda Vivó & María Rosario Balaguer Franch - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (1):31-57.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Corporate Governance and Sustainability Performance: Analysis of Triple Bottom Line Performance.Nazim Hussain, Ugo Rigoni & René P. Orij - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (2):411-432.
    The study empirically investigates the relationship between corporate governance and the triple bottom line sustainability performance through the lens of agency theory and stakeholder theory. We claim, in fact, that no single theory fully accounts for all the hypothesised relationships. We measure sustainability performance through manual content analysis on sustainability reports of the US-based companies. The study extends the existing literature by investigating the impact of selected corporate governance mechanisms on each dimension of sustainability performance, as defined by the GRI (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Are Environmental Social Governance Equity Indices a Better Choice for Investors? An Asian Perspective.Ramiz Ur Rehman, Junrui Zhang, Jamshed Uppal, Charles Cullinan & Muhammad Akram Naseem - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):440-459.
    This article examines the risk and return profiles of stock indices composed of companies meeting environmental, social and governance screening criteria [such as the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices ] and conventional composite indices of eight Asian countries from 2002 to 2014. The results indicate that there are no significant differences in the returns or risk-adjusted returns between the ESG indices and the composite indices within countries. The results do reveal that the market volatility of the ESG indices is higher than (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Is Institutional Ownership Related to Corporate Social Responsibility? The Nonlinear Relation and Its Implication for Stock Return Volatility.Maretno Harjoto, Hoje Jo & Yongtae Kim - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):77-109.
    This study examines the relation between corporate social responsibility and institutional investor ownership, and the impact of this relation on stock return volatility. We find that institutional ownership does not strictly increase or decrease in CSR; rather, institutional ownership is a concave function of CSR. This evidence suggests that institutional investors do not see CSR as strictly value-enhancing activities. Institutional investors adjust their percentage of ownership when CSR activities go beyond the perceived optimal level. Employing the path analysis, we also (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Institutional Investors on Boards: Does Their Behavior Influence Corporate Finance?Emma García-Meca, Felix López-Iturriaga & Fernando Tejerina-Gaite - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):365-382.
    We examine whether the behavior of institutional investors representatives on boards leads to observable differences in corporate finance. We find that directors representing pressure-sensitive investors prefer lower financial leverage whereas pressure-resistant directors show no particular preference. When analyzed separately, directors appointed by banks and insurance firms have different attitudes. Bank representatives on boards increase both the financial leverage and the banking debt. This result suggests that some types of institutional directors provide financial resources to the firms on whose board they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Institutional Interest, Ownership Type, and Environmental Capital Expenditures: Evidence From the Most Polluting Chinese Listed Firms.Wenjing Li & Xiaoyan Lu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):459-476.
    This study empirically examines whether firms’ environmental capital expenditures impact institutional investors’ investment decisions in the Chinese market. We particularly examine the impact of ownership type on the relationship of environmental capital expenditures and the behavior of different types of institutional investors by classifying institutional investors into two categories, short-term and long-term investors. In addition, this study further investigates whether environmental capital expenditures related to ownership type increase firm value. We find that long-term institutional investors tend to invest in state-owned (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Fraud in Sustainability Departments? An Exploratory Study.Maria Steinmeier - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):477-492.
    While sustainability is largely associated with do-gooders, this article discusses whether and how fraud might also be an issue in sustainability departments. More specifically, transferring the concept of the fraud triangle to sustainability departments I discuss possible pressures/incentives, opportunities, and rationalizations/attitudes for sustainability managers to commit fraud. Based on interviews with sustainability and forensic practitioners, my findings suggest that sustainability managers face mounting pressure and have opportunities to manipulate due to an immature control environment. Whether a presumably morality-driven attitude may (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On the Corporate Social Responsibility Perceptions of Equity Analysts.Christian Fieseler - 2011 - Business Ethics 20 (2):131-147.
    The importance of communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) not only to socially responsible investors but also to the mainstream of the financial community is gaining importance in a more competitive capital market environment. This article looks at how equity analysts at the German stock exchange in Frankfurt – individuals who are not particularly involved in socially responsible investment (SRI) research – perceive economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibility strategies. The evidence obtained in our interviews suggests that responsibility issues are increasingly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • What Good Does Doing Good Do? The Effect of Bond Rating Analysts’ Corporate Bias on Investor Reactions to Changes in Social Responsibility.Oana Branzei, Jeff Frooman, Brent Mcknight & Charlene Zietsma - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):183-203.
    In this study, we explore how investors reconcile information on firms’ social responsibility with analysts’ assessments of future firm risk in the pricing of long-term bonds. We ask whether investors pay attention to small strides toward and/or small slips away from socially responsible behavior, arguing that analysts’ corporate bias toward gains and against losses influences investor reactions to corporate social responsibility. We hypothesize that analysts notice and reward improvements in social responsibility, yet excuse lapses. We find support for this hypothesis, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Social Norms and CSR Performance.Steven F. Cahan, Chen Chen & Li Chen - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):493-508.
    Some institutional investors are exposed to social norms and public scrutiny. Prior research indicates that these norm-constrained institutions engage in negative screening and invest less in firms operating in ‘sin’ industries. We examine whether social norms also motivate these institutions to engage in positive screening—where they invest more in firms with better corporate social responsibility performance—and CSR-related activism—where they promote improvements in the CSR of existing investees. We find that firms with superior CSR performance have greater ownership by norm-constrained institutions, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds? Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99-129.
    With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporation's long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a company's long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • How Can a Ratings-Based Method for Assessing Corporate Social Responsibility Provide an Incentive to Firms Excluded From Socially Responsible Investment Indices to Invest in CSR?Avshalom Madhala Adam & Tal Shavit - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):899-905.
    Socially Responsible Investment indices play a major role in the stock markets. A connection between doing good and doing well in business is implied. Leading indices, such as the Domini Social Index and others, exemplify the movement toward investing in socially responsible corporations. However, the question remains: Does the ratings-based methodology for assessing corporate social responsibility provide an incentive to firms excluded from SRI indices to invest in CSR? Not in its current format. The ratings-based methodology employed by SRI indices (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On the Corporate Social Responsibility Perceptions of Equity Analysts.Christian Fieseler - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (2):131-147.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Identifying Impediments to SRI in Europe: A Review of the Practitioner and Academic Literature. [REVIEW]Carmen Juravle & Alan Lewis - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (3):285-310.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations