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  1. Corporate Social Responsibility as Institution: A Social Mechanisms Framework.Sara Bice - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):17-34.
    Recent research suggests that corporate social responsibility is institutionalised amongst multinational corporations. Yet CSR scholarship faces considerable challenges. An agreed definition is lacking, even amongst researchers adopting aligned approaches. Studies remain heavily focused on making a business case for CSR, despite its widespread acceptance into business practice. Few studies examine CSR’s on-ground implications for the communities it purports to help, favouring instead a macro-level focus. And concerns about CSR’s sincerity, motivations and ethics perpetuate questions about its integrity. This article argues (...)
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  • Labour Leverage in Global Value Chains: The Role of Interdependencies and Multi-Level Dynamics.Christina Niforou - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):301-311.
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  • What Determines Principle-Based Standards Implementation? Reporting on Global Compact Adoption in Spanish Firms.Silvia Ayuso, Mercè Roca, Jorge A. Arevalo & Deepa Aravind - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):553-565.
    International Accountability Standards have proliferated in the last 20 years, with the UN Global Compact as the most widely accepted principle-based standard catalyzing voluntary participation by firms. This study aims to improve understanding about the factors that determine companies’ progress in adopting principle-based standards. Drawing on the resource-based view of the firm, we examine the direct and combined influences of different organizational resources on standard implementation as perceived by 213 Spanish GC signatories. Our results reveal that the level of firm-specific (...)
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  • Corporate Constructed and Dissent Enabling Public Spheres: Differentiating Dissensual From Consensual Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Glen Whelan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):755-769.
    I here distinguish dissensual from consensual corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the grounds that the former is more concerned to organize (or portray) corporate-civil society disagreement than it is corporate-civil society agreement. In doing so, I first conceive of consensual CSR, and identify a positive and negative view thereof. Second, I conceive of dissensual CSR, and suggest that it can be actualized through the construction of dissent enabling, rather than consent-oriented, public spheres. Following this, I describe four actor-centred institutional theories—i.e. (...)
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  • CSR-Washing is Rare: A Conceptual Framework, Literature Review, and Critique.Shawn Pope & Arild Wæraas - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):173-193.
    Growth in CSR-washing claims in recent decades has been dramatic in numerous academic and activist contexts. The discourse, however, has been fragmented, and still lacks an integrated framework of the conditions necessary for successful CSR-washing. Theorizing successful CSR-washing as the joint occurrence of five conditions, this paper undertakes a literature review of the empirical evidence for and against each condition. The literature review finds that many of the conditions are either highly contingent, rendering CSR-washing as a complex and fragile outcome. (...)
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  • The Paradox of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards.Simone de Colle, Adrian Henriques & Saras Sarasvathy - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-15.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a constructive criticism of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) standards. After pointing out a number of benefits and limitations in the effectiveness of CSR standards, both from a theoretical point of view and in the light of empirical evidence, we formulate and discuss a Paradox of CSR standards: despite being well-intended, CSR standards can favor the emergence of a thoughtless, blind and blinkered mindset which is counterproductive of their aim of enhancing the social (...)
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  • Complete and Partial Organizing for Corporate Social Responsibility.Andreas Rasche, Frank G. A. De Bakker & Jeremy Moon - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):651-663.
    This paper investigates different modes of organizing for corporate social responsibility (CSR). Based on insights from organization theory, we theorize two ways to organize for CSR. “Complete” organization for CSR happens within businesses and depends on the availability of certain organizational elements (e.g., membership, hierarchy, rules, monitoring, and sanctioning). By contrast, “partial” organization for CSR happens when organizers do not have direct access to all these organizational elements. We discuss partial organization for CSR by analyzing how standards and cross-sector partnerships (...)
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  • The Politics of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives: The Crisis of the Forest Stewardship Council.Steffen Böhm, André Spicer & Sandra Moog - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):469-493.
    Multi-stakeholder initiatives have become a vital part of the organizational landscape for corporate social responsibility. Recent debates have explored whether these initiatives represent opportunities for the “democratization” of transnational corporations, facilitating civic participation in the extension of corporate responsibility, or whether they constitute new arenas for the expansion of corporate influence and the private capture of regulatory power. In this article, we explore the political dynamics of these new governance initiatives by presenting an in-depth case study of an organization often (...)
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  • Multinationals' Accountability on Sustainability: The Evolution of Third-Party Assurance of Sustainability Reports. [REVIEW]Paolo Perego & Ans Kolk - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):173-190.
    In this article we explore how multinational corporations (MNCs) adopt assurance practices to develop and sustain organizational accountability for sustainability. Using a panel of Fortune Global 250 firms over a period of 10 years, we document the diffusion patterns of third-party assurance of sustainability reports. We specifically investigate how evolving auditing practices, namely diversity of assurance standards and type of assurance providers, shape the quality of sustainability assurance statements. The results illustrate great variability in the adoption of assurance practices in (...)
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  • Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
    Poor working conditions remain a serious problem in supplier facilities in developing countries. While previous research has explored this from the developed buyers’ side, we examine this phenomenon from the perspective of developing countries’ suppliers and subcontractors. Utilizing qualitative data from a major knitwear exporting cluster in India and a stakeholder management lens, we develop a framework that shows how the assumptions of conventional, buyer-driven voluntary governance break down in the dilution of buyer power and in the web of factors (...)
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  • How Do Firms Comply with International Sustainability Standards? Processes and Consequences of Adopting the Global Reporting Initiative.Laurence Vigneau, Michael Humphreys & Jeremy Moon - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):469-486.
    This paper addresses the issue of the influence of global governance institutions, particularly international sustainability standards, on a firm’s intra-organizational practices. More precisely, we provide an exploratory empirical view of the impact of the Global Reporting Initiative on a multinational corporation’s corporate social responsibility management practices. We investigate standard compliance by comparing the stated intention of the use of the GRI with its actual use and the consequent effects within the firm. Based on an in-depth case study, our findings illustrate (...)
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  • Towards an Ethical Research Agenda for International HRM: The Possibilities of a Plural Cosmopolitan Framework. [REVIEW]Maddy Janssens & Chris Steyaert - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):61-72.
    In this conceptual paper, we aim to develop a much needed ethical research agenda for international Human Resource Management (HRM), given that the changing geopolitical dynamics interrogate the political role of multinational companies and the ethical stance they take in their HRM practices. To theoretically ground this agenda, we turn to cosmopolitanism and distinguish three main perspectives—political, cultural, and social—each of which implies a different understanding of the self–other relation in the context of the global world. We translate the core (...)
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  • “Norming” and “Conforming”: Integrating Cultural and Institutional Explanations for Sustainability Adoption in Business. [REVIEW]Dan V. Caprar & Benjamin A. Neville - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):231-245.
    Sustainability is increasingly a matter of concern in the corporate world. Many business scholars have analyzed the phenomenon from institutional and cultural perspectives, addressing the key questions of what drives the spread of sustainability principles, and also why sustainability adoption varies so widely among organizations and cultures. In this article, we propose that sustainability adoption can be better explained by integrating the insights from the institutional and cultural perspectives. This would break the current practice of choosing one approach or the (...)
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